AEPA English Practice Test Questions

78 Questions | Total Attempts: 43

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In most of the English grammar problems, students have can be solved by a teacher knowing the weak points of their students and helping them through it. Are you planning on passing the upcoming Arizona Educator Proficiency Assessment exam? Take up this practice quiz and be guaranteed a pass. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Read the passage below from Coal: A Human History by Barbara Freese; then answer the question that follows.When the Romans invaded Britain, among the natural riches they found there were conspicuous outcrops of a velvety deep black mineral. It was declared the "best stone in Britain" by one Roman writer because it could easily be carved and polished into beautiful jewelry. In time, Britain became known for its exports of this prized material, and fashionable citizens back in Rome eagerly adorned themselves with it. Not only were the black trinkets they carved from it stylish, but they had the surprising and mysterious attribute of being flammable as well. They called this mineral gagate (a word that over the years changedto "jet," as in "jet black"), which is actually a special form of dense coal. Because they weren't good at telling the difference, though, it seems that many Romans were not wearing true jet but plain old coal—the same stuff that would much later be considered the best stone in Britain for entirely different reasons.Based on information presented in thepassage above, a reader would be best ableto draw which of the followingconclusions?
    • A. 

      Coal was more important to the Romans than silver or gold.

    • B. 

      The Romans can be credited with bringing fine jewelry to Britain.

    • C. 

      Coal during this time period was not used as a fuel source by the Romans.

    • D. 

      The Romans favored aesthetic values over utilitarian ones.

  • 2. 
    Read the passage below; then answer the three questions that follow.Recent discoveries have bolstered the case for the existence of life on Mars. This possibility, long debated in both the scientific and popular press, centers on whether the Red Planet contains sufficient quantities of liquid water to sustain life. Although it has long been known that the Martian polar caps are partially composed of ice, evidence for the existence of liquid water has been much more elusive—so elusive, in fact, that most scientists discounted the possibility of Martian life. They argued that atmospheric conditions near the planet's equator turned ice directly into gas without going through a liquid phase. Any liquid water rising to the surface from warmer regions inside the planet would immediately freeze and be slowly drawn into the atmosphere.Then in the 1990s, an unmanned space vehicle from the European Space Agency's Mars Express project landed on the planet's surface and produced photographs that made the possibility of liquid water much more conceivable than many had imagined. The new photographs showed an equatorial formation that looked like terrestrial pack ice. The photos pointed to the possibility of liquid subsurface water whose motion had caused the ice on the surface to move, break into pieces, and then refreeze.The area in question is roughly 278,000 square miles in extent, 150 feet deep, and is covered with a layer of ash and dust that appears to have protected the ice from reacting with the atmosphere. Nearby formations suggest that this "ocean" of ice gushed onto the planet's surface from a group of deep cracks in the ground. The evidence indicates a sudden bursting of great quantities of water from the ground, which quickly froze into a vast area of ice. The same area where the ice was discovered also was found to contain high concentrations of methane. That this gas is often an end product of biological reactions makes the prospect of life on Mars even more likely.These findings have stirred considerable excitement in the scientific community. The discovery of warm, wet places beneath the Martian surface that predate the beginnings of life on Earth, scientists note, is a matter of considerable importance. That some such places are probably still there is even more significant. For where there is water, there is always the potential for life.Which of the following excerpts from thepassage is a general statement?
    • A. 

      The new photographs showed an equatorial formation that looked like terrestrial pack ice.

    • B. 

      The area in question is roughly 278,000 square miles in extent, 150 feet deep, and is covered with a layer of ash and dust that appears to have protected the ice from reacting with the atmosphere.

    • C. 

      The same area where the ice was discovered also was found to contain high concentrations of methane.

    • D. 

      The discovery of warm, wet places beneath the Martian surface that predate the beginnings of life on Earth, scientists note, is a matter of considerable importance.

  • 3. 
    Which of the following lists of topicsbest summarizes the information as it ispresented in the passage?
    • A. 

      1. atmospheric conditions near the Martian equator 2. discovery of an equatorial formation on Mars 3. discovery of deep cracks on the surface of Mars

    • B. 

      1. reasons scientists believed life could not exist on Mars 2. new evidence produced by the Mars Express project 3. significance of the discovery of warm, wet places beneath the Martian surface

    • C. 

      1. composition of the Martian polar caps 2. temperature of the Martian atmosphere 3. location of subsurface water on Mars

    • D. 

      1. debates among scientists about the possibility of life on Mars 2. description of the area surveyed by the Mars Express project of the early 1990s 3. renewed debate among scientists about the existence of life on Mars

  • 4. 
    Which of the following is a validinference that can be made from theinformation in the passage?
    • A. 

      Scientists know less about Mars than they do about most other planets.

    • B. 

      There are major disagreements among scientists on many issues.

    • C. 

      Scientists often reassess existing theories as new evidence emerges.

    • D. 

      It is impossible to anticipate major advances in scientific knowledge.

  • 5. 
    Read the poem below by Li-Young Lee; then answer the question that follows.I Ask My Mother to SingShe begins, and my grandmother joins her.Mother and daughter sing like young girls.If my father were alive, he would playhis accordion and sway like a boat.I've never been in Peking, or the Summer Palace,nor stood on the great Stone Boat to watchthe rain begin on Kuen Ming Lake, the picnickersrunning away in the grass.But I love to hear it sung;how the waterlilies fill with rain untilthey overturn, spilling water into water,then rock back, and fill with more.Both women have begun to cry.But neither stops her song.The women's tears in the final stanza ofthe poem above are best described as anexpression of:
    • A. 

      Joyous gratitude.

    • B. 

      Indignant defiance.

    • C. 

      Nostalgic longing.

    • D. 

      Unbearable loneliness.

  • 6. 
    Read the excerpt below from A Room of One's Own, an essay by Virginia Woolf; then answer the two questions that follow.I told you in the course of this paper that Shakespeare had a sister; but do not look for her in Sir Sidney Lee's life of the poet. She died young—alas, she never wrote a word. She lies buried where the omnibuses now stop, opposite the Elephant and Castle. Now my belief is that this poet who never wrote a word and was buried at the crossroads still lives. She lives in you and in me, and in many other women who are not here tonight, for they are washing up the dishes and putting the children to bed. But she lives: for great poets do not die; they are continuing presences; they need only the opportunity to walk among us in the flesh. This opportunity, as I think, it is now coming within your power to give her. For my belief is that if we live another century or so—I am talking of the common life which is the real life and not of the separate lives which we live as individuals—and have five hundred a year each of us androoms of our own; if we have the habit of freedom and the courage to write exactly what we think; if we escape a little from the common sitting-room and see human beings not always in their relation to each other but in relation to reality; and the sky, too, and the trees or whatever it may be in themselves; if we look past Milton's bogey, for no human being should shut out the view; if we face the fact, for it is a fact, that there is no arm to cling to, but that we go alone and that our relation is to the world of reality and not only to the world of men and women, then the opportunity will come and the dead poet who was Shakespeare's sister will put on the body she has so often laid down.It can be inferred from the excerpt that theauthor was most likely addressing anaudience composed primarily of:
    • A. 

      Women with knowledge of English literary history.

    • B. 

      Working-class women hoping to make their personal lives easier.

    • C. 

      Thoughtful readers with little or no interest in English literature.

    • D. 

      Social scientists interested in the effects of poverty on women.

  • 7. 
    In this excerpt, the author's purpose ismost likely to raise questions about:
    • A. 

      The debilitating emotional trauma suffered by those who lose a sibling at a young age.

    • B. 

      The waning influence that the works of Shakespeare are having on English culture.

    • C. 

      The sometimes adversarial relationship between men and women in contemporary society.

    • D. 

      The social and financial constraints that prevent women from producing literature and art.

  • 8. 
    Read the passage below from Fire on the Mountain, a novel by Edward Abbey; then answer the question that follows.Those mountains—they seemed at once both close by and impossibly remote, an easy walk away and yet beyond the limits of the imagination. Between us lay the clear and empty wilderness of scattered mesquite trees and creosote shrubs and streambeds where water ran as seldom as the rain came down. Each summer for three years I had come to New Mexico; each time I gazed upon the moon-dead landscape and asked myself: what is out there? And each time I concluded: something is out there—maybe everything. To me the desert looked like a form of Paradise. And it always will.In the passage above, the author uses aseries of ambiguous expressions in hisdescription of the landscape to:
    • A. 

      Hide his deep-seated aversion to the dry and desolate Southwest environment.

    • B. 

      Convey the complicated and seemingly contradictory feelings he experiences when in the desert.

    • C. 

      Avoid stating explicitly how he feels about having traveled to the Southwest for three years.

    • D. 

      Reflect the severely anxious state he experiences when contemplating his relationship to nature.

  • 9. 
    When using the Internet to gatherinformation about a subject, a researchercould best ensure that information iscredible and sources are objective byrelying mainly on Web sites that:
    • A. 

      Are frequently updated and edited.

    • B. 

      Have clearly identified the authors of all information.

    • C. 

      Are familiar and easy to use.

    • D. 

      Have posted information for at least ten years.

  • 10. 
    Read the poem below by Martín Espada; then answer the two questions that follow.Coca-Cola and Coco FríoOn his first visit to Puerto Rico,island of family folklore,the fat boy wanderedfrom table to tablewith his mouth open.At every table, some great-auntwould steer him with cool spotted handsto a glass of Coca-Cola.One even sang to him, in all the Englishshe could remember, a Coca-Cola jinglefrom the forties. He drank obediently, thoughhe was bored with this potion, familiarfrom soda fountains in Brooklyn.Then, at a roadside stand off the beach, the fat boyopened his mouth to coco frío, a coconutchilled, then scalped by a macheteso that a straw could inhale the clear milk.The boy tilted the green shell overheadand drooled coconut milk down his chin;suddenly, Puerto Rico was not Coca-Colaor Brooklyn, and neither was he.For years afterward, the boy marveled at an islandwhere the people drank Coca-Colaand sang jingles from World War IIin a language they did not speak,while so many coconuts in the treessagged heavy with milk, swollenand unsuckled.In the poem, repeating the image of theboy's "opened . . . mouth" is most likelyintended to evoke which of the followingideas?
    • A. 

      The boredom that children endure when forced to attend social events consisting mainly of adults

    • B. 

      The willingness of children to welcome experiences that are unfamiliar, unusual, or typically overlooked by others

    • C. 

      The desire that children have for sweets and soda and most all other sugary foods usually forbidden to them

    • D. 

      The tendency of children to speak their minds unhesitatingly, sometimes to the great embarrassment of adults

  • 11. 
    The use of language in this poem createsan overall mood best described as:
    • A. 

      Somber and bored.

    • B. 

      Anxious and excited.

    • C. 

      Indifferent and withdrawn.

    • D. 

      Reflective and curious.

  • 12. 
    Read the excerpt below from "A Vision Beyond Time and Place" by N. Scott Momaday; thenanswer the question that follows.When my father was a boy, an old man used to come to [my grandfather] Mammedaty's house and pay his respects. He was a lean old man in braids and was impressive in his age and bearing. His name was Cheney, and he was an arrowmaker. Every morning, my father tells me, Cheney would paint his wrinkled face, go out, and pray aloud to the rising sun.I often think of old man Cheney, and of his daily devotion to the sun. He was a man who saw very deeply into the distance, I believe, one whose vision extended far beyond the physical boundaries of his time and place. In his mind's eye he could integrate all the realities and illusions of the earth and sky; they became for him profoundly intelligible and whole.Most Indian people are able to see in these terms. It is indeed the basis upon which they identify themselves as individuals and as a race. When old man Cheney looked into the sunrise, he saw as far into himself, I suspect, as he saw into the distance. He knew certainly of his existence and of his place in the scheme of things.In contrast, most of us in this society are afflicted with a kind of cultural nearsightedness. . . . [W]e do not see beyond the buildings and billboards that seem at times to be the monuments of our civilization, and consequently we fail to see into the nature and meaning of our own humanity. Now, more than ever, we might do well to enter upon a vision quest of our own, that is, a quest after vision itself.Which of the following best describes theNative American "vision" the authordiscusses?
    • A. 

      A firm conviction of the uniqueness of Native American culture

    • B. 

      A unifying perception of the interconnectedness of all things

    • C. 

      A psychological insight into the common needs of all human beings

    • D. 

      A philosophical awareness of the illusion of the material world

  • 13. 
    Read the passage below; then answer the two questions that follow.In colonial America, the Great Awakening of the 1730s and 1740s had important social and political consequences. In many locales, Protestant churches split into Old Light and New Light branches. Where such divisions occurred, Old Light churches attracted older and wealthier individuals who represented the traditional social establishment. Their members viewed the emotionalism of the Great Awakening as a threat to law and order and preferred a more restrained form of religion. By contrast, members of New Light congregations tended to be younger and less wealthy than their Old Light counterparts. Most strongly opposed state churches, which governments in colonies such as Massachusetts and Virginia forced them to support with their tax dollars.The New Light members were also more likely to link religious values with a concern for social justice. This did not make them social revolutionaries. Even the most radical revivalists did at no time urge their followers to overthrow the existing social order, and these followers never took any subversive actions on their own. What common people did take from the revivalist message was a conviction that under certain circumstances it was justifiable to act in their own behalf. For many, this was a new way of viewing society. Colonial America was a very deferential world in which power flowed in one direction: from the top down. Anything that challenged this conception of how the world worked created at least the potential for change.Which of the following rhetorical strategiesdoes the author use in the passageto convince the reader to accept his or herpoint of view?
    • A. 

      Appealing to emotion

    • B. 

      Reiterating reader concerns

    • C. 

      Appealing to logic

    • D. 

      Responding to reader skepticism

  • 14. 
    Which of the following excerpts from thepassage expresses an opinion rather than afact?
    • A. 

      The Great Awakening of the 1730s and 1740s had important social and political consequences.

    • B. 

      In many locales, Protestant churches split into Old Light and New Light branches.

    • C. 

      By contrast, members of New Light congregations tended to be younger and less wealthy than their Old Light counterparts.

    • D. 

      Even the most radical revivalists did at no time urge their followers to overthrow the existing social order.

  • 15. 
    A proficient reader is most likely to readat a moderate to slow rate when:
    • A. 

      Studying a journal article to learn about a topic for a research paper.

    • B. 

      Scanning a textbook to find key terms and their definitions.

    • C. 

      Skimming a newspaper to stay informed about current events.

    • D. 

      Searching the Internet to locate information for a presentation.

  • 16. 
    Structural analysis would be the mostuseful strategy to apply to help a readerdetermine the meaning of which of thefollowing words?
    • A. 

      Oxymoron

    • B. 

      Antithesis

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 17. 
    Before reading a chapter in a textbook,students write on a KWL chart what theyalready know and what they want to knowabout the topic of the chapter. Afterreading the chapter, the students thenrecord what they learned from the chapteron the chart. This activity is most likelyto promote the students' reading comprehensionby helping them:
    • A. 

      Apply their knowledge of the features of expository texts.

    • B. 

      Learn the meanings of unfamiliar words.

    • C. 

      Connect their background knowledge to new information.

    • D. 

      Adjust their reading rate based on text difficulty.

  • 18. 
    While reading a chapter in a textbook, astudent pauses periodically to summarizeand reflect on the contents of each passage.This strategy is likely to promotecomprehension most by helping thestudent:
    • A. 

      Decode the text at a slow, steady rate.

    • B. 

      Visualize concepts presented in the text.

    • C. 

      Use context clues to interpret new words in the text.

    • D. 

      Synthesize important ideas from the text.

  • 19. 
    During a play, the primary purpose of asoliloquy is to:
    • A. 

      Establish a conflict between the protagonist and another major character.

    • B. 

      Reveal the personal thoughts and emotions of a character.

    • C. 

      Provide a resolution to the conflict in the play.

    • D. 

      Allow the author to directly address the audience.

  • 20. 
    Read the excerpt below from Our Town,a play by Thornton Wilder; thenanswer the question that follows.STAGE MANAGER. This play is called"Our Town." . . . The name of the town isGrover's Corners, New Hampshire—justacross the Massachusetts line: latitude42 degrees 40 minutes; longitude70 degrees 37 minutes. The First Actshows a day in our town. The day isMay 7, 1901. The time is just beforedawn.[A rooster crows.]The sky is beginning to show some streaksof light over in the East there, behind ourmount'in. The morning star always getswonderful bright the minute before it hasto go—doesn't it?In the excerpt above, the role of the stagemanager is most characteristic of which ofthe following traditional dramatic roles?
    • A. 

      The hero

    • B. 

      The fool

    • C. 

      The antagonist

    • D. 

      The chorus

  • 21. 
    Biographers consider personal diariesspecially valuable as source materialbecause, unlike other kinds of nonfiction,these works characteristically contain:
    • A. 

      A continuous narrative of events in the author's formative years.

    • B. 

      Preliminary drafts of the author's correspondence.

    • C. 

      An unbiased assessment of the author's accomplishments.

    • D. 

      Candid accounts of the author's experiences and opinions.

  • 22. 
    Read the poem below by Percy Bysshe Shelley; then answer the question that follows.To WordsworthPoet of Nature, thou hast wept to knowThat things depart which never may return:Childhood and youth, friendship and love's first glow,Have fled like sweet dreams, leaving thee to mourn.These common woes I feel. One loss is mineWhich thou too feel'st, yet I alone deplore.Thou wert as a lone star, whose light did shineOn some frail bark in winter's midnight roar:Thou hast like to a rock-built refuge stoodAbove the blind and battling multitude:In honoured poverty thy voice did weaveSongs consecrate to truth and liberty,—Deserting these, thou leavest me to grieve,Thus having been, that thou shouldst cease to be.The poem above best exemplifies whichof the following poetic forms?
    • A. 

      Sonnet

    • B. 

      Ode

    • C. 

      Limerick

    • D. 

      Ballad

  • 23. 
    The experience of the Great Depressionand its influence on the culture of theUnited States are significant themes in theworks of which of the following writers?
    • A. 

      Willa Cather

    • B. 

      F. Scott Fitzgerald

    • C. 

      Edith Wharton

    • D. 

      John Steinbeck

  • 24. 
    The nineteenth-century writings ofHarriet Jacobs and Frederick Douglassdemonstrate the ability of literature to:
    • A. 

      Entertain readers with fantastic tales of imaginary worlds.

    • B. 

      Transform public opinion and increase awareness of social issues.

    • C. 

      Provide readers with utopian visions of a perfect society.

    • D. 

      Reinterpret history through the use of allegory and symbolism.

  • 25. 
    Read the excerpt below from TheWoman Warrior, a memoir by MaxineHong Kingston; then answer thequestion that follows.It was a woman who invented white craneboxing only two hundred years ago. Shewas already an expert pole fighter,daughter of a teacher trained at the Shaolintemple, where there lived an order offighting monks. She was combing herhair one morning when a white cranealighted outside her window. She teased itwith her pole, which it pushed aside with asoft brush of its wing. Amazed, shedashed outside and tried to knock thecrane off its perch. It snapped her pole intwo. Recognizing the presence of greatpower, she asked the spirit of the whitecrane if it would teach her to fight. Itanswered with a cry that white craneboxers imitate today. Later the birdreturned as an old man, and he guided herboxing for many years. Thus she gave theworld a new martial art.The story featured in the excerpt aboveprovides a contemporary variation onwhich of the following literary forms?
    • A. 

      Lyric

    • B. 

      Folktale

    • C. 

      Comedy

    • D. 

      Saga

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