Adverb Quiz With Answers

Reviewed by Juliette Firla
Juliette Firla, MA (Teaching Writing) |
K-12 English Expert
Review Board Member
Juliette is a middle school English teacher at Sacred Heart of Greenwich, Connecticut. Juliette earned a BA in English/Language Arts Teacher Education from Elon University and an MA in Teaching Writing from Johns Hopkins University. She holds a Classroom Teacher license from the Connecticut State Department of Education. Juliette possesses strong skills in English language arts, writing, editing, and literature study. She has a deep passion for working with young people and contributing to the education of America's youth in the classroom.
, MA (Teaching Writing)
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Adverb Quiz With Answers - Quiz

This adverb quiz will test your ability to identify adverbs and improve your skills by hopefully teaching you a bit about using adverbs in English sentences. Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. This quiz has ten questions… Try to get each correct and earn the highest score possible. Time to see how well you really understand this tricky part of speech! Good luck!


Adverb Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "I have been a fan of mystery stories since I was young."

    • A.

      Fan

    • B.

      Quite

    • C.

      A

    • D.

      Since

    • E.

      Young

    Correct Answer
    D. Since
    Explanation
    The adverb "since" is used to mark the starting point of a time period that continues to the present. In this sentence, it connects the past action of becoming a fan to the current state of still being a fan. It sets a temporal frame that extends from the past ("I was young") to the ongoing present.

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  • 2. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "Some stories are incredibly exciting from start to finish."

    • A.

      Some

    • B.

      Are

    • C.

      Incredibly

    • D.

      Exciting

    • E.

      From

    Correct Answer
    C. Incredibly
    Explanation
    "Incredibly" is an intensifier, a type of adverb that modifies adjectives to enhance their degree or intensity. Here, it amplifies the adjective "exciting," suggesting that the stories are not just exciting; they are extremely so. This adverb helps to convey an exceptional level of excitement that persists throughout the stories.

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  • 3. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "Others build suspense very slowly."

    • A.

      Others, very

    • B.

      Others, slowly

    • C.

      Others, very, slowly

    • D.

      Very

    • E.

      Very, slowly

    Correct Answer
    E. Very, slowly
    Explanation
    "Slowly" describes the manner in which the suspense is built—gradually over time. The adverb "very" further intensifies "slowly," enhancing the slow pace to emphasize how gradually the suspense increases, adding to the reader's anticipation.

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  • 4. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "If I like a story, I almost never put it down until I finish it."

    • A.

      A, almost, never

    • B.

      Almost, never, until

    • C.

      A, never, down

    • D.

      A, almost, down

    • E.

      Almost, never, down

    Correct Answer
    B. Almost, never, until
    Explanation
    In this sentence, "almost" modifies "never," combining to form a phrase that means "rarely" or "hardly ever." This indicates that the speaker seldom stops reading a story they enjoy before finishing it. The adverb "until" introduces a condition of continuity, marking the point in time at which the action of reading is concluded, thus framing the speaker's habit of reading through to the end.

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  • 5. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "In many cases, I can scarcely prevent myself from peeking at the last chapter to see the ending."

    • A.

      Many

    • B.

      From

    • C.

      At

    • D.

      Prevent

    • E.

      Scarcely

    Correct Answer
    E. Scarcely
    Explanation
    "Scarcely" modifies the verb "prevent," conveying a sense of difficulty in avoiding a particular action—in this case, the action of peeking at the end of a book. It suggests that the speaker almost lacks the ability to stop themselves, highlighting the struggle against their own curiosity.

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  • 6. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "She had never been more determined to succeed, and then, with unwavering focus, she tackled the challenge head-on."

    • A.

      A, then, more

    • B.

      Never, then, more

    • C.

      A, never, then

    • D.

      A, never, more

    • E.

      Never, more

    Correct Answer
    B. Never, then, more
    Explanation
    "Never" is an absolute negative adverb, stating that at no previous point had she been as determined as she was at that moment. "More" is a comparative adverb that increases the adjective "determined" to its highest degree yet. "Then" functions as a sequential adverb, marking the transition to the action that follows her peak determination.

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  • 7. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "My favorite detectives are ones who cleverly match wits with equally clever villains."

    • A.

      Favorite, cleverly

    • B.

      Favorite, clever

    • C.

      Cleverly, equally

    • D.

      Clever, cleverly

    • E.

      Equally, clever

    Correct Answer
    C. Cleverly, equally
    Explanation
    "Cleverly" describes the manner in which the detectives match wits, implying skill and intelligence in their approach. "Equally" modifies the adjective "clever," suggesting that the villains possess a level of cleverness that matches the detectives', ensuring a balanced and intriguing conflict.

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  • 8. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "I especially like detectives who carefully hunt for clues."

    • A.

      Like

    • B.

      Hunt

    • C.

      Like, especially

    • D.

      Especially, carefully

    • E.

      Hunt, carefully

    Correct Answer
    D. Especially, carefully
    Explanation
    "Especially" signals a particular preference, emphasizing that the speaker has a strong liking for detectives who approach their work with caution and thoroughness, which is further described by "carefully." This adverb indicates meticulousness and precision in the detectives' method of searching for clues.

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  • 9. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "The clues that they uncover are almost found in unexpected, spooky places."

    • A.

      Almost, always

    • B.

      Are, almost, always

    • C.

      Are

    • D.

      Almost

    • E.

      Are, always

    Correct Answer
    D. Almost
    Explanation
    In the sentence "The clues that they uncover are almost found in unexpected, spooky places," the word "almost" is the adverb. It modifies the verb "found" to describe the extent to which the clues are found. The other words listed in the options do not function as adverbs in this context.

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  • 10. 

    Point out the adverb/adverbs in the statement: "It's amazing how detectives can use these clues to solve the most complicated cases."

    • A.

      Amazing

    • B.

      Cases

    • C.

      Solve

    • D.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. None of the above
    Explanation
    There is no adverb in this sentence that fits the criteria for modifying a verb, adjective, or another adverb. "Amazing" functions as an adjective describing the manner in which detectives solve cases. Therefore, the answer is none of the above.

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Juliette Firla |MA (Teaching Writing) |
K-12 English Expert
Juliette is a middle school English teacher at Sacred Heart of Greenwich, Connecticut. Juliette earned a BA in English/Language Arts Teacher Education from Elon University and an MA in Teaching Writing from Johns Hopkins University. She holds a Classroom Teacher license from the Connecticut State Department of Education. Juliette possesses strong skills in English language arts, writing, editing, and literature study. She has a deep passion for working with young people and contributing to the education of America's youth in the classroom.

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  • Current Version
  • Jun 19, 2024
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    Juliette Firla
  • Dec 01, 2009
    Quiz Created by
    Melaniealoi
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