Act/SAT Questions Of The Day Test 14

6 Questions | Total Attempts: 47

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Act Quizzes & Trivia

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  • 1. 
    Critical Reading > Sentence Completions Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.  The editor denied any knowledge of the reporter’s alleged unethical interview techniques, claiming he had been ------- her finished work but not of her journalistic practices.
    • A. 

      Vindicated by

    • B. 

      Bemused by

    • C. 

      Acknowledged by

    • D. 

      Wary of

    • E. 

      Cognizant of

  • 2. 
    What is the least value of x that satisfies the equation x2 – 7x + 6 = 6 ?
    • A. 

      1

    • B. 

      0

    • C. 

      -4

    • D. 

      -6

    • E. 

      -7

  • 3. 
    Writing > Improving Sentences Part of the following sentence is underlined; beneath the sentence are five ways of phrasing the underlined material. Select the option that produces the best sentence. If you think the original phrasing produces a better sentence than any of the alternatives, select choice A.  Unlike her sister Heather, who would always put spiders safely outside if she found them in the house, Joanne’s fear kept her from going anywhere near the creatures.
    • A. 

      Joanne’s fear kept her from going anywhere near the creatures

    • B. 

      Joanne’s fear is what kept her from going anywhere near the creatures

    • C. 

      Joanne was too afraid to go anywhere near the creatures

    • D. 

      Fear is why Joanne had not gone anywhere near them

    • E. 

      They scared Joanne too much to go anywhere near them

  • 4. 
    PROSE FICTION: This passage is adapted from Elizabeth Bishop’s short story "The Housekeeper" (©1984 by Alice Methfessel).     Outside, the rain continued to run down the screened windows of Mrs. Sennett's little Cape Cod cottage. The long weeds and grass that composed the front yard dripped against the blurred background of 5   the bay, where the water was almost the color of the grass. Mrs. Sennett's five charges were vigorously playing house in the dining room. (In the wintertime, Mrs. Sennett was housekeeper for a Mr. Curley, in Boston, and during the summers the Curley children 10   boarded with her on the Cape.) My expression must have changed. "Are those children making too much noise?" Mrs. Sennett demanded, a sort of wave going over her that might mark the beginning of her getting up out of her chair. I 15   shook my head no, and gave her a little push on the shoulder to keep her seated. Mrs. Sennett was almost stone-deaf and had been for a long time, but she could read lips. You could talk to her without making any sound yourself, if you wanted to, and she more than 20   kept up her side of the conversation in a loud, rusty voice that dropped weirdly every now and then into a whisper. She adored talking. To look at Mrs. Sennett made me think of eigh- teenth-century England and its literary figures. Her hair 25   must have been sadly thin, because she always wore, indoors and out, either a hat or a sort of turban, and sometimes she wore both. The rims of her eyes were dark; she looked very ill. Mrs. Sennett and I continued talking. She said she 30   really didn't think she'd stay with the children another winter. Their father wanted her to, but it was too much for her. She wanted to stay right here in the cottage. The afternoon was getting along, and I finally left because I knew that at four o'clock Mrs. Sennett's "sit 35   down" was over and she started to get supper. At six o'clock, from my nearby cottage, I saw Theresa coming through the rain with a shawl over her head. She was bringing me a six-inch-square piece of spicecake, still hot from the oven and kept warm between two soup 40   plates. A few days later I learned from the twins, who brought over gifts of firewood and blackberries, that their father was coming the next morning, bringing their aunt and her husband and their cousin. Mrs. 45   Sennett had promised to take them all on a picnic at the pond some pleasant day. On the fourth day of their visit, Xavier arrived with a note. It was from Mrs. Sennett, written in blue ink, in a large, serene, ornamented hand, on linen-finish 50   paper: . . . Tomorrow is the last day Mr. Curley has and the Children all wanted the Picnic so much. The Men can walk to the Pond but it is too far for the Children. I see your Friend has a car and I hate to ask this but 55   could you possibly drive us to the Pond tomorrow morning? . . . Very sincerely yours, Carmen Sennett After the picnic, Mrs. Sennett's presents to me 60   were numberless. It was almost time for the children to go back to school in South Boston. Mrs. Sennett insisted that she was not going; their father was coming down again to get them and she was just going to stay. He would have to get another housekeeper. She said 65   this over and over to me, loudly, and her turbans and kerchiefs grew more and more distrait. One evening, Mary came to call on me and we sat on an old table in the back yard to watch the sunset. "Papa came today," she said, "and we've got to go 70   back day after tomorrow." "Is Mrs. Sennett going to stay here?" "She said at supper she was. She said this time she really was, because she'd said that last year and came back, but now she means it." 75   I said, "Oh dear," scarcely knowing which side I was on. "It was awful at supper. I cried and cried." "Did Theresa cry?" "Oh, we all cried. Papa cried, too. We always do." 80   "But don't you think Mrs. Sennett needs a rest?" "Yes, but I think she'll come, though. Papa told her he'd cry every single night at supper if she didn't, and then we all did." The next day I heard that Mrs. Sennett was going 85   back with them just to "help settle." She came over the following morning to say goodbye, supported by all five children. She was wearing her traveling hat of black satin and black straw, with sequins. High and somber, above her ravaged face, it had quite a Spanish- 90   grandee air. "This isn't really goodbye," she said. "I'll be back as soon as I get these bad, noisy children off my hands." But the children hung on to her skirt and tugged at 95   her sleeves, shaking their heads frantically, silently saying, "No! No! No!" to her with their puckered-up mouths. What is the main insight suggested by the conversation in lines 69–83?
    • A. 

      The Curley family cries to manipulate Mrs. Sennett into doing what they want.

    • B. 

      Mrs. Sennett intends to return to the Cape soon because she has discovered that they have been manipulating and taking advantage of her.

    • C. 

      Mrs. Sennett is happy to leave the Curley family because they are always whining and crying.

    • D. 

      The narrator regrets that she is not going to Boston and is a little jealous of Mrs. Sennett.

  • 5. 
    Mathematics > Standard Multiple Choice Read the following SAT test question and then click on a button to select your answer.  If , for which of the following values of is NOT defined?
    • A. 

      3

    • B. 

      2

    • C. 

      -1

    • D. 

      -3

    • E. 

      -4

  • 6. 
    Abandoned cornfields have been the sites of investigations concerning ecological succession, the orderly progression of changes in the plant and/or animal life of an area over time (see Figure 1). (Note: The plants are ordered according to their appearance during ecological succession.)   the early stages of succession, the principal community (living unit) that dominates is the pioneer community. Pioneer plants are depicted in Figure 2.   The final stage of ecological succession is characterized by the presence of the climax community, the oak-hickory forest. Figure 3 depicts the gradual change from pine to hardwoods.   Figures adapted from Eugene P. Odum, Fundamentals of Ecology. ©1971 by Saunders College Publishing/Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, Inc. According to Figure 2, pioneer plant(s) showing a progressive increase in summed diameter of stems per unit area over the course of several years of succession is(are):
    • A. 

      Aster and broomsedge only.

    • B. 

      Horseweed only.

    • C. 

      Broomsedge only.

    • D. 

      Horseweed, aster, and broomsedge.

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