Act/SAT Questions Of The Day Test 2

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 43

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Act/SAT Questions Of The Day Test 2

Students will take a quiz on the ACT/SAT Questions of the day for this week.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Read the following SAT test question, then click on a button to select your answer.  To make an orange dye,parts of red dye are mixed withparts of yellow dye. To make a green dye,parts of blue dye are mixed withpart of yellow dye. If equal amounts of green and orange are mixed, what fraction of the new mixture is yellow dye?
    • A. 

      3/16

    • B. 

      1/4

    • C. 

      3/8

    • D. 

      11/30

    • E. 

      7/12

  • 2. 
    Bessie Coleman: In Flight [1]     After the final performance of one last practice landing, the French instructor nodded to the young African-American woman at the controls and jumped down to the ground. Bessie Coleman was on her own now. She lined up the nose of the open cockpit biplane on the runway's center mark, she gave the engine full throttle, and took off into history. [2]     It was a long journey from the American Southwest she'd been born in 1893, to these French skies. The year in which she was born was about a century ago. There hadn't been much of a future for her in Oklahoma then. After both semesters of the two-semester year at Langston Industrial College, Coleman headed for Chicago to see what could be done to realize a dream. Ever since she saw her first airplane when she was a little girl, Coleman had known that someday, somehow, she would fly. [3]     Try as she might, however, Coleman could not obtain flying lessons anywhere in the city. Then she sought aid from Robert S. Abbott of the Chicago Weekly Defender. The newspaperman got in touch with a flight school in France that was willing to teach this determined young woman to fly. [4]     [1] While they're, she had as one of her instructors Anthony Fokker, the famous aircraft designer. [2] Bessie Coleman took a quick course in French, should she settle her affairs, and sailed for Europe. [3] Coping with a daily foreign language and flying in capricious, unstable machines held together with baling wire was daunting, but Coleman persevered.  [5]     On June 15, 1921, Bessie Coleman, earned an international pilot's license, issued by the International Aeronautical Federation. Not only was she the first black woman to win her pilot's wings, she was the first American woman to hold this coveted license. [6]     She was ready for a triumphant return to the United States to barnstorm and lecture proof that if the will is strong enough for one's dream can be attained................................Choose the best alternative for the underlined part.
    • A. 

      NO CHANGE

    • B. 

      Stronger than

    • C. 

      Strong enough,

    • D. 

      Strongly enough,

  • 3. 
    fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.  Refuting the claim that the surest way to reduce anger is to express it, the author asserts that
    • A. 

      Denying . . impact

    • B. 

      Venting . . intensity

    • C. 

      Understanding . . importance

    • D. 

      Voicing . . benefits

    • E. 

      Overcoming . . likelihood

  • 4. 
    PROSE FICTION: This passage is adapted from Elizabeth Bishop’s  short story "The Housekeeper" (©1984 by Alice Methfessel). Outside, the rain continued to run down the  screened windows of Mrs. Sennett's little Cape Cod  cottage. The long weeds and grass that composed the  front yard dripped against the blurred background of 5   the bay, where the water was almost the color of the  grass. Mrs. Sennett's five charges were vigorously  playing house in the dining room. (In the wintertime,  Mrs. Sennett was housekeeper for a Mr. Curley, in  Boston, and during the summers the Curley children 10   boarded with her on the Cape.) My expression must have changed. "Are those  children making too much noise?" Mrs. Sennett  demanded, a sort of wave going over her that might mark the beginning of her getting up out of her chair. I 15   shook my head no, and gave her a little push on the  shoulder to keep her seated. Mrs. Sennett was almost  stone-deaf and had been for a long time, but she could  read lips. You could talk to her without making any  sound yourself, if you wanted to, and she more than 20   kept up her side of the conversation in a loud, rusty voice that dropped weirdly every now and then into a  whisper. She adored talking. To look at Mrs. Sennett made me think of eigh- teenth-century England and its literary figures. Her hair 25   must have been sadly thin, because she always wore, indoors and out, either a hat or a sort of turban, and  sometimes she wore both. The rims of her eyes were  dark; she looked very ill. Mrs. Sennett and I continued talking. She said she 30   really didn't think she'd stay with the children another winter. Their father wanted her to, but it was too much  for her. She wanted to stay right here in the cottage. The afternoon was getting along, and I finally left  because I knew that at four o'clock Mrs. Sennett's "sit 35   down" was over and she started to get supper. At six o'clock, from my nearby cottage, I saw Theresa coming  through the rain with a shawl over her head. She was  bringing me a six-inch-square piece of spicecake, still  hot from the oven and kept warm between two soup 40   plates. A few days later I learned from the twins, who  brought over gifts of firewood and blackberries, that  their father was coming the next morning, bringing  their aunt and her husband and their cousin. Mrs. 45   Sennett had promised to take them all on a picnic at the  pond some pleasant day. On the fourth day of their visit, Xavier arrived  with a note. It was from Mrs. Sennett, written in blue  ink, in a large, serene, ornamented hand, on linen-finish 50   paper: . . . Tomorrow is the last day Mr. Curley has and  the Children all wanted the Picnic so much. The Men  can walk to the Pond but it is too far for the Children. I  see your Friend has a car and I hate to ask this but 55   could you possibly drive us to the Pond tomorrow  morning? . . . Very sincerely yours,  Carmen Sennett After the picnic, Mrs. Sennett's presents to me 60   were numberless. It was almost time for the children to  go back to school in South Boston. Mrs. Sennett  insisted that she was not going; their father was coming  down again to get them and she was just going to stay. He would have to get another housekeeper. She said 65   this over and over to me, loudly, and her turbans and  kerchiefs grew more and more distrait. One evening, Mary came to call on me and we sat  on an old table in the back yard to watch the sunset. "Papa came today," she said, "and we've got to go 70   back day after tomorrow." "Is Mrs. Sennett going to stay here?" "She said at supper she was. She said this time she  really was, because she'd said that last year and came back, but now she means it." 75   I said, "Oh dear," scarcely knowing which side I  was on. "It was awful at supper. I cried and cried." "Did Theresa cry?" "Oh, we all cried. Papa cried, too. We always do." 80   "But don't you think Mrs. Sennett needs a rest?" "Yes, but I think she'll come, though. Papa told  her he'd cry every single night at supper if she didn't,  and then we all did." The next day I heard that Mrs. Sennett was going 85   back with them just to "help settle." She came over the  following morning to say goodbye, supported by all  five children. She was wearing her traveling hat of  black satin and black straw, with sequins. High and  somber, above her ravaged face, it had quite a Spanish- 90   grandee air. "This isn't really goodbye," she said. "I'll be back as soon as I get these bad, noisy children off my  hands." But the children hung on to her skirt and tugged at 95   her sleeves, shaking their heads frantically, silently  saying, "No! No! No!" to her with their puckered-up  mouths. Considering how Mrs. Sennett is portrayed in the passage, it is most reasonable to infer that the word ravaged, as it is used in line 89, most nearly means that her face reveals:
    • A. 

      Age and fatigue

    • B. 

      Irritation and annoyance

    • C. 

      Resentfulness and anger

    • D. 

      Enthusiasm and excitement

  • 5. 
    Read the following SAT test question, then click on a button to select your answer. If the length and width of rectangle A are 10 percent less and 30 percent less, respectively, than the length and width of rectangle B, the area of A is equal to what percent of the area of B?
    • A. 

      60%

    • B. 

      6%

    • C. 

      63%

    • D. 

      40%

    • E. 

      3%

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