Act/SAT Questions Of The Day Test 1

8 Questions | Total Attempts: 48

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Act/SAT Questions Of The Day Test 1

Choose the best answer from the following:


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The following sentence contains either a single error or no error at all. If the sentence contains an error, select the one underlined part that must be changed to make the sentence correct. If the sentence contains no error, select choice E.   Although (A)
    • A. 

      A

    • B. 

      B

    • C. 

      C

    • D. 

      D

    • E. 

      E

  • 2. 
    PROSE FICTION: This passage is adapted from Elizabeth Bishop’s short story "The Housekeeper" (©1984 by Alice Methfessel). Outside, the rain continued to run down the screened windows of Mrs. Sennett's little Cape Cod cottage. The long weeds and grass that composed the front yard dripped against the blurred background of 5               the bay, where the water was almost the color of the grass. Mrs. Sennett's five charges were vigorously playing house in the dining room. (In the wintertime, Mrs. Sennett was housekeeper for a Mr. Curley, in Boston, and during the summers the Curley children 10               boarded with her on the Cape.)   My expression must have changed. "Are those children making too much noise?" Mrs. Sennett demanded, a sort of wave going over her that might mark the beginning of her getting up out of her chair. I 15               shook my head no, and gave her a little push on the shoulder to keep her seated. Mrs. Sennett was almost stone-deaf and had been for a long time, but she could read lips. You could talk to her without making any sound yourself, if you wanted to, and she more than 20               kept up her side of the conversation in a loud, rusty voice that dropped weirdly every now and then into a whisper. She adored talking.   To look at Mrs. Sennett made me think of eigh- teenth-century England and its literary figures. Her hair 25               must have been sadly thin, because she always wore, indoors and out, either a hat or a sort of turban, and sometimes she wore both. The rims of her eyes were dark; she looked very ill.   Mrs. Sennett and I continued talking. She said she 30               really didn't think she'd stay with the children another winter. Their father wanted her to, but it was too much for her. She wanted to stay right here in the cottage.   The afternoon was getting along, and I finally left because I knew that at four o'clock Mrs. Sennett's "sit 35               down" was over and she started to get supper. At six o'clock, from my nearby cottage, I saw Theresa coming through the rain with a shawl over her head. She was bringing me a six-inch-square piece of spicecake, still hot from the oven and kept warm between two soup 40               plates.   A few days later I learned from the twins, who brought over gifts of firewood and blackberries, that their father was coming the next morning, bringing their aunt and her husband and their cousin. Mrs. 45               Sennett had promised to take them all on a picnic at the pond some pleasant day.   On the fourth day of their visit, Xavier arrived with a note. It was from Mrs. Sennett, written in blue ink, in a large, serene, ornamented hand, on linen-finish 50               paper:   . . . Tomorrow is the last day Mr. Curley has and the Children all wanted the Picnic so much. The Men can walk to the Pond but it is too far for the Children. I see your Friend has a car and I hate to ask this but 55              could you possibly drive us to the Pond tomorrow morning? . . .   Very sincerely yours,   Carmen Sennett   After the picnic, Mrs. Sennett's presents to me 60               were numberless. It was almost time for the children to go back to school in South Boston. Mrs. Sennett insisted that she was not going; their father was coming down again to get them and she was just going to stay. He would have to get another housekeeper. She said 65               this over and over to me, loudly, and her turbans and kerchiefs grew more and more distrait.   One evening, Mary came to call on me and we sat on an old table in the back yard to watch the sunset.   "Papa came today," she said, "and we've got to go 70               back day after tomorrow."   "Is Mrs. Sennett going to stay here?"   "She said at supper she was. She said this time she really was, because she'd said that last year and came back, but now she means it."   75               I said, "Oh dear," scarcely knowing which side I was on.   "It was awful at supper. I cried and cried."   "Did Theresa cry?"   "Oh, we all cried. Papa cried, too. We always do."   80               "But don't you think Mrs. Sennett needs a rest?"   "Yes, but I think she'll come, though. Papa told her he'd cry every single night at supper if she didn't, and then we all did."   The next day I heard that Mrs. Sennett was going 85               back with them just to "help settle." She came over the following morning to say goodbye, supported by all five children. She was wearing her traveling hat of black satin and black straw, with sequins. High and somber, above her ravaged face, it had quite a Spanish- 90               grandee air.   "This isn't really goodbye," she said. "I'll be back as soon as I get these bad, noisy children off my hands."   But the children hung on to her skirt and tugged at 95               her sleeves, shaking their heads frantically, silently saying, "No! No! No!" to her with their puckered-up mouths.   Which of the following does the passage suggest is the result of Mrs. Sennett’s loss of hearing?
    • A. 

      She is often frustrated and short-tempered.

    • B. 

      She is a shy and lonely woman.

    • C. 

      She dislikes conversation.

    • D. 

      She can lip-read.

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      I only

    • B. 

      I and II only

    • C. 

      I and III only

    • D. 

      II and IV only

    • E. 

      I, II, III, and IV

  • 4. 
    TestAbandoned cornfields have been the sites of investigations concerning ecological succession, the orderly progression of changes in the plant and/or animal life of an area over time (see Figure 1).   (Note: The plants are ordered according to their appearance during ecological succession.)
    • A. 

      Large pine trees with an understory of hardwood trees.

    • B. 

      Pine seedlings only.

    • C. 

      Oak-hickory hardwood forests only.

    • D. 

      Early invading species like horseweed, aster, and broomsedge.

  • 5. 
    Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted in the sentence, best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. The senator chose to incur dislike rather than ------- her principles to win favor with the public.
    • A. 

      Gratify

    • B. 

      Endorse

    • C. 

      Compromise

    • D. 

      Accuse

    • E. 

      Advertise

  • 6. 
    Philosophy and Baseball      In the fall of 1967, the Boston Red Sox were playing in the World Series. I was a freshman at a university that was located in the Midwest at the time, enrolled in a philosophy course that met at two in the afternoon. The course was taught by a native Bostonian. He wanted to watch the games on television, but he was too responsible to cancel class. So he conducted classes, those October afternoons, while actually listening to the games on a small transistor radio propped up inside his lectern, the volume turned down so that only he could hear.       Baseball is unique among American sports by its ability to appeal to a love resembling that of a child of fable and legend. Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio, Roberto Clemente—names like these will echo through time that are trumpet calls to storied battles fought and won in ages past.  When Hank Aaron stretched out a sinewy arm to pull one down, striding up to a rack of ash-hewn bats, he became a modern-day knight selecting their lance. And when glints of the afternoon sun shone off Mickey Mantle's colossal bat, there will have to be seen for one brief, stirring moment the glimmer of the jewels in King Arthur's own mighty sword, Excalibur.      So there he stood, that learned professor of mine, lecturing about the ideas, that have engaged people's minds for centuries. Then he'd interrupt himself to announce, with smiling eyes, that the Sox had taken a two-to-nothing lead. Here was a man who's mind was disciplined inside his schoolbook to contemplate the collected wisdom of the ages—and he was behaving like a boy with a contraband comic opened. On those warm October days, as the afternoon sun dances and plays on the domes and spires of the university, the philosophers had to stand aside, for the professor's imagination had transported him to the Boston of his youth.   Choose the best alternative for the underlined part.
    • A. 

      NO CHANGE

    • B. 

      Dances, playing

    • C. 

      Danced and played

    • D. 

      Dancing and playing

  • 7. 
    Part of the following sentence is underlined; beneath the sentence are five ways of phrasing the underlined material. Select the option that produces the best sentence. If you think the original phrasing produces a better sentence than any of the alternatives, select choice A. Johannes Gutenberg is generally credited to bring together the two main concepts of modern printing: movable pieces of metal type that could be reused, and a printing press for producing sharp impressions on paper over and over.
    • A. 

      To bring

    • B. 

      With bringing

    • C. 

      As he brought

    • D. 

      By bringing

    • E. 

      For the fact of bringing

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      6

    • B. 

      9

    • C. 

      12

    • D. 

      15

    • E. 

      18

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