British Literature II: Final Exam

44 Questions | Total Attempts: 83

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British Literature Quizzes & Trivia

A quiz based on older identification questions in British Literature II. This is for the final exam (not the mid term).


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Here lies, to each her parents’ ruth, Mary, the daughter of their youth; Yet all heaven’s gifts being heaven’s due, it makes the father less to rue.
    • A. 

      Mac Flecknoe

    • B. 

      To my book

    • C. 

      On my first daugther

    • D. 

      Easter Wings

  • 2. 
    Some ne’er advance a judgement of their own, But catch the spreading notion of town; They reason and conclude by precedent, And own stale nonsense which the ne’er invent. Some judge of authors’ names, not works, and then Nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men.
    • A. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • B. 

      Epistle from Mrs. Young to her Husband

    • C. 

      The rape of the lock

    • D. 

      An essay on criticism

  • 3. 
    The great contentions of criticism is to find the faults of the moderns and the beauties of the ancients. While an author is yet living we estimate his powers by his worst performance; and when he his dead we rate them by his best. To works, however, of which the excellence is not absolute and definite, but gradual and comparative; to works not raised upon principles demonstrative and scientific, but appealing wholly to observation and experience, no other test can be applied than length of duration and continuance of esteem.
    • A. 

      An essay on man

    • B. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • C. 

      A dictionary of the English language

    • D. 

      Preface to Shakespeare

  • 4. 
    GOLBASTO MOMAREN EVLAME GURDILO SHEFIN MULLY ULLY GUE, most mighty emperor of Lilliput, delight and terror of the universe, whose dominions extend five thousand blustrugs (about twelve miles in circumference) to the extremities of the globe; Monarch of all Monarchs, taller than the sons of men; whose feet press down to the centre, and whose head strikes against the sun; at whose nod the princes of the earth shake their knees; pleasant as the spring, comfortable as the summer, fruitful as autumn, dreadful as winter. His most sublime Majesty proposeth to the Man-Mountain, lately arrived at our celestial dominions, the following articles, which by solemn oath he shall be obliged to perform.
    • A. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • B. 

      The Rape of the Lock

    • C. 

      Ode to Evening

    • D. 

      The Deserted Village

  • 5. 
    But when to mischief mortals bend their will, How soon they find instruments of ill! Just then, Clarissa drew with tempting grace A two-edged weapon from her shining case: So ladies in romance assist their knight Present the spear, and arm him for the fight.
    • A. 

      Volpone

    • B. 

      The rape of the lock

    • C. 

      An essay on man

    • D. 

      The pulley

  • 6. 
    “Yet let him keep the rest, But keep them with repining restlessness: Let him be rich and weary, that at least, If goodness lead him not, yet weariness May toss him to my breast”
    • A. 

      Pamphilia to Amphilanthus

    • B. 

      The Life of Samuel Johnson

    • C. 

      The Pulley

    • D. 

      To the Virgins, to make much of time

  • 7. 
    Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today, Tomorrow will be dying.
    • A. 

      To the virgins, to make much of time

    • B. 

      To his coy mistress

    • C. 

      An essay on criticism

    • D. 

      Volpone

  • 8. 
    I grant this food will be somewhat dear, and therefore very proper for landlords, who, as they have already devoured most of the parents, seem to have the best title to the children.
    • A. 

      Ode to Evening

    • B. 

      The Castaway

    • C. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • D. 

      A Modest Proposal

  • 9. 
    Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell; And in the lowest deep a lower deep Still threat’ning to devour me opens wide, To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heav’n.
    • A. 

      The Fellowship of the Ring

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      The Journal and Letters

    • D. 

      Volpone

  • 10. 
    So X swore, nor should his vow be vain,     That he till death true dullness would maintain; And in his father's right, and realm's defence,                                       Ne'er to have peace with wit, nor truce with sense.
    • A. 

      On my first son

    • B. 

      Mac Flecknoe

    • C. 

      Easter Wings

    • D. 

      Redemption

  • 11. 
    My wife and family received me with great surprise and joy, because they concluded me certainly dead; but I must freely confess the sight of them filled me only with hatred, disgust, and contempt; and the more, by reflecting on the near alliance I had to them. ...And when I began to consider that, by copulating with one of the Yahoo species I had become a parent of more, it struck me with the utmost shame, confusion, and horror.
    • A. 

      Areopagitica

    • B. 

      On my first son

    • C. 

      An essay on man

    • D. 

      Gulliver's Travels

  • 12. 
    Know then thyself, presume God not to scan. The proper study of mankind is man.
    • A. 

      Volpone

    • B. 

      Mac Flecknoe

    • C. 

      An essay on man

    • D. 

      The Rape of the Lock

  • 13. 
    Had we but world enough, and time, this coyness, lady, were no crime. We would sit down, and think which way To walk, and pass our long love’s day.
    • A. 

      The Kite Runner

    • B. 

      To his coy mistress

    • C. 

      The Journal and Letters

    • D. 

      On my first son

  • 14. 
    The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Awaits alike th' inevitable hour:- The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
    • A. 

      Elegy written in a country church-yard

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      An essay on dramatic poesy

    • D. 

      An essay on criticism

  • 15. 
    Where there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making. Under these fantastic terrors of sect and schism, we wrong the earnest and zealous thirst after knowledge and understanding which God hath stirr'd up in this city.
    • A. 

      Redemption

    • B. 

      Easter Wings

    • C. 

      Paradise Lost

    • D. 

      Areopagitica

  • 16. 
    A little learning is a dang'rous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring: There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, And drinking largely sobers us again.
    • A. 

      An essay on man

    • B. 

      An essay on criticism

    • C. 

      Volpone

    • D. 

      On my first daughter

  • 17. 
    I straight returned, and knowing His great birth, Sought Him accordingly in great resorts-- In cities, theatres, gardens, parks, and courts: At length I heard a ragged noise and mirth Of thieves and murderers; there I Him espied, Who straight, "Your suit is granted," said, and died.
    • A. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • B. 

      Rape of the Lock

    • C. 

      Redemption

    • D. 

      The Castaway

  • 18. 
    I had, the evening before, drunk plentifully of a most delicious wine … [and] The heat I had contracted by coming very near the flames, and by labouring to quench them, made the wine begin to operate by urine; which I voided in such a quantity, and applied so well to the proper places, that in three minutes the fire was wholly extinguished … [I thought] I had done a very eminent piece of service.
    • A. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • B. 

      Volpone

    • C. 

      The Preface to Shakespeare

    • D. 

      Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

  • 19. 
    Too, too severely laws of honor bind The weak submissive sex of womankind. If sighs have gained or force compelled our hand, Deceived by art, or urged by stern command, Whatever motive binds the fatal tie, The judging world expects our constancy.  
    • A. 

      Easter Wings

    • B. 

      The diary

    • C. 

      An essay on criticism

    • D. 

      Epistle from Mrs. Yonge to her Husband

  • 20. 
    Their dread Commander. He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tow'r; his form had yet not lost All her original brightness.
    • A. 

      An essay of dramatic poesy

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      To his coy mistress

    • D. 

      The journal and letters

  • 21. 
    Now air is hushed, save where the weak-ey'd bat With short shrill shriek flits by on leathern wing, Or where the beetle winds His small but sullen horn As oft he rises 'midst the twilight path
    • A. 

      Easter Wings

    • B. 

      The pulley

    • C. 

      Ode to evening

    • D. 

      An essay on man

  • 22. 
    When, snatched from all effectual aid, We perished, each alone: But I beneath a rougher sea, And whelmed in deeper gulfs than he
    • A. 

      The castaway

    • B. 

      Easter Wings

    • C. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • D. 

      Epistle from Mrs. Young to her Husband

  • 23. 
    The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know, from the first act to the last, that the stage is only a stage, and that the players are only players ... and where is the absurdity of allowing that space to represent first Athens, and then Sicily, which was always known to be neither Sicily nor Athens, but a modern theatre?
    • A. 

      An essay on criticism

    • B. 

      Preface to Shakespeare

    • C. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • D. 

      Rape of the lock

  • 24. 
    I believe no gentleman would repine to give ten shillings for the carcass of a good fat child, which, as I have said, will make four dishes of excellent nutritive meat, when he hath only some particular friend or his own family to dine with him.
    • A. 

      Volpone

    • B. 

      The pulley

    • C. 

      An essay on man

    • D. 

      A modest proposal

  • 25. 
    That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former
    • A. 

      Ode to Evening

    • B. 

      To the virgins, to make much of time

    • C. 

      Easter Wings

    • D. 

      Volpone

  • 26. 
    Some of us had been permitted to stay on the deck for the fresh air; but now that the whole ship’s cargo were confined together, it became absolutely pestilential. The closeness of the place and the heat of the climate, added to the number in the ship, which was so crowded that each had scarcely room to turn himself, almost suffocated us.
    • A. 

      The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

    • B. 

      Rape of the lock

    • C. 

      To his coy mistress

    • D. 

      The Life of Samuel Johnson

  • 27. 
    He was perfectly astonished with the historical account I gave him of our affairs during the last century, protesting it was only an heap of conspiracies, rebellions, murders, massacres, revolutions, banishments, the very worst effects that avarice, faction, hypocrisy, perfidiousness, cruelty, rage, madness, hatred, envy, lust, malice, or ambition could produce.
    • A. 

      The Journal and Letters

    • B. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • C. 

      Paradise Lost

    • D. 

      The Castaway

  • 28. 
    Good morning to the day, and, next my gold! Open the shrine that I may see my saint.
    • A. 

      Ode to Evening

    • B. 

      The Rape of the Lock

    • C. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • D. 

      Volpone

  • 29. 
    True wit is Nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne’er so well expressed. Something whose truth convinced at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.
    • A. 

      On my first daughter

    • B. 

      An essay on criticism

    • C. 

      An essay on man

    • D. 

      On my first son

  • 30. 
    Said I. “I do indeed come from Scotland, but I cannot help it.” … I meant this as light pleasantry to soothe and conciliate him … but however that might be, this speech was somewhat unlucky, for with that quickness of wit for which he was so remarkable, he seized the expression “come from Scotland,” [and] retorted, “That, Sir, I find, is what a very great many of your countrymen cannot help.”
    • A. 

      The Life of Samuel Johnson

    • B. 

      The Diary

    • C. 

      An essay on criticism

    • D. 

      A Dictionary of the English Language

  • 31. 
    Now once again by all concurrence of signs, and by the general instinct of  holy and devout men, as they daily and solemnly express their thoughts, God is decreeing to begin some new and great period in his church, even to the reforming of the Reformation itself; what does he then but reveal himself to his servants, and as his manner is, first to his Englishmen?
    • A. 

      The Castaway

    • B. 

      The Life of Samuel Johnson

    • C. 

      Areopagitica

    • D. 

      On my first son

  • 32. 
    So many cares, so many maladies, So many fears attending on old age, Yea, death so often called on, as no wish Can be more frequent with ‘em, their limbs faint, Their senses dull, their seeing, hearing, going [= ability to walk], All dead before them; yea, their very teeth, Their instruments of eating failing them – Yet this is reckoned life!  
    • A. 

      On my first son

    • B. 

      To the virgins, to make much of time

    • C. 

      Volpone

    • D. 

      The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

  • 33. 
    Having stayed, and in an hour’s time seen the fire rage every way, and  nobody to my sight endeavouring to quench it [and only trying] to remove their goods … Everything after so long a drought [was] proving combustable.
    • A. 

      The Diary

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      The Rape of the Lock

    • D. 

      Easter Wings

  • 34. 
    I protest I was ready to die. I knew not in what state he might be at the time; I only knew the orders to keep out of his way were universal; that the queen would highly disapprove any unauthorized meeting, and that the very action of my running away might deeply, in his present irritable state, offend him. Nevertheless, on I ran, too terrified to stop.
    • A. 

      The Journal and Letters

    • B. 

      On my first son

    • C. 

      To his Coy Mistress

    • D. 

      The Life of Samuel Johnson

  • 35. 
    The mind is its own place, and in itself Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n. What matter where? ... Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heav'n.
    • A. 

      Epistle from Mrs. Yonge to Her Husband

    • B. 

      Paradise Lost

    • C. 

      Mac Flecknoe

    • D. 

      Pamphilia to Amphilanthus

  • 36. 
    All bargains but conditional are made [= subject to certain conditions]; The purchase void, the creditor unpaid; Defrauded servants are from service free; A wounded slave regains his liberty. For wives ill used no remedy remains, To daily racks condemned, and to eternal chains
    • A. 

      The Castaway

    • B. 

      Shakespeare and Ben Jonson compared

    • C. 

      Epistle from Mrs. Yonge to her Husband

    • D. 

      The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

  • 37. 
    X alone my perfect image bears, Mature in dullness from his tender years; X alone, of all my sons, is he Who stands confirmed in full stupidity.
    • A. 

      Areopagitica

    • B. 

      A Modest Proposal

    • C. 

      The Diary

    • D. 

      Mac Flecknoe

  • 38. 
    Nor, cruel as it seemed, could he Their haste himself condemn, Aware that flight, in such a sea, Alone could rescue them; Yet bitter felt it still to die Deserted, and his friends so nigh.
    • A. 

      The Castaway

    • B. 

      An Essay of Dramatic Poesy

    • C. 

      Gulliver's Travels

    • D. 

      Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

  • 39. 
    Let not Ambition mock their useful toil, Their homely joys, and destiny obscure; Nor Grandeur hear with a disdainful smile The short and simple annals of the poor
    • A. 

      Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

    • B. 

      The Deserted Village

    • C. 

      Shakespeare and Ben Jonson compared

    • D. 

      Paradise Lost

  • 40. 
    The grave's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue Sits on thy skin like morning dew ... Now let us sport us while we may.
    • A. 

      Redemption

    • B. 

      A Modest Proposal

    • C. 

      An Essay on Criticism

    • D. 

      To His Coy Mistress

  • 41. 
    Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey,   Where wealth accumulates, and men decay;   Princes and lords may flourish, or may fade;   A breath can make them, as a breath has made:   But a bold peasantry, their country's pride,   When once destroyed, can never be supplied.
    • A. 

      To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

    • B. 

      Epistle from Mrs. Yonge to Her Husband

    • C. 

      The Deserted Village

    • D. 

      An Essay on Criticism

  • 42. 
    Love a child is ever crying, Please him, and he straight is flying; Give him, he the more is craving, Never satisfied with having.
    • A. 

      Paradise Lost

    • B. 

      Areopagitica

    • C. 

      To his coy mistress

    • D. 

      Pamphilia to Amphilanthus

  • 43. 
    His first defect is that to which may be imputed most of the evil in books or in men.  He sacrifices virtue to convenience, and is so much more careful to please than to instruct that he seems to write without any moral purpose ... This fault the barbarity of his age cannot extenuate; for it is always a writer's duty to make the world better.
    • A. 

      The Pulley

    • B. 

      The Preface to Shakespeare

    • C. 

      Gulliver’s Travels

    • D. 

      A Dictionary of the English Language

  • 44. 
    Lord, who createdst man in wealth and store [= abundance] Though foolishly he lost the same        Decaying more and more        Till he became          Most poor.
    • A. 

      Volpone

    • B. 

      The Rape of the Lock

    • C. 

      Easter Wings

    • D. 

      Pamphilia to Amphilanthus