4th Grade Reading Test! Fun Trivia Quiz

5 Questions | Total Attempts: 57

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4th Grade Quizzes & Trivia

English is quite an interesting language to study, and so far, there is much that we have learned. How good are your reading skills, so now? Do you think that you might need some more study time? Take up the 4th-grade reading test below and get to see how good your skills are getting so far. All the best!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The Name Game 1 Have you ever gone somewhere new where you didn’t know anyone? Maybe you went to a new school and met lots of new people. Maybe you went to someone’s house where there were children you didn’t know. 2 One good way to get to know everyone is to play "The Name Game." Here is how the game is played. 3 First, ask everyone to sit down in a circle. Decide in advance who will be the first person to start the game. Then teach everyone The Name Game song. The Name Game song is easy to learn. Do you know the song, "Row Your Boat"? The Name Game Song has the same tune, but different words. It goes like this: 4 Won’t you let me know, Let me know your name? Tell me yours, I’ll tell you mine, Then we’ll start again. 5 Once everyone knows the song, you are ready to play the game. Number off, with the first person in the circle being "one" and the person on their left "two," and so on. Now, ask everyone to sing the song. Then person "one" says their own name out loud. The people in the circle repeat the name, all together. Then everyone sings the song again. Now it’s the turn of person "two," who says their own name, and then listens as the circle repeats it. 6 Keep going around the circle, singing the song and saying names, until everyone has said their name. Listen, and remember as many names as you can! When you finish, you may not be able to recall everyone’s name. However, you will know a few names, and that’s a good start to making new friends. The author organizes the article, ”The Name Game” by —
    • A. 

      Identifying the cause and effect of the game

    • B. 

      Comparing and contrasting names

    • C. 

      Showing the order of importance

    • D. 

      Sequencing the game activities

  • 2. 
    The Name of a Friend 1 It was the first day of a new school year, and Juan and his older sister, Maria, were walking to school. Juan was going to be in the fourth grade. He was happy about starting school again. But his family had moved to a new town, so he would be going to his new school for the first time. He was uneasy about going to a class where everyone was foreign to him. 2 "I won't know anyone," said Juan to Maria as they got closer to the school. "None of my old friends will be at this school." 3 "No, they won't," Maria said. "But we'll meet new people, and soon, we'll have new friends." 4 "But I won't even know anyone's name," said Juan. "And they won't know mine!" 5 "You'll learn their names soon," said Maria. "Learning someone's name is the first step to having a new friend. Here is what I'm going to do. When I sit down, I'm going to select someone to meet. I'm going to turn to the person on my left. I'm going to ask him or her their name, and then I'm going to tell them mine. Why don't you do the same? Then you'll know at least one person!" 6 "That's a pretty good plan!" said Juan, and he decided he would do just that. But it didn't work out that way. Juan's teacher, Mr. Green, took him to his seat. It was at the edge of the room. There was no one sitting to Juan's left! 7 "That doesn't really matter," Juan thought. "The important thing is to meet someone and learn their name." So instead of turning to his left, Juan turned to his right, and there he saw a girl wearing a bright yellow shirt. "Hi," he said, "my name is Juan. What's your name?" 8 "I'm Annie," said the girl, smiling, and she held out her hand and shook Juan's hand. "I'm new to this school. Maybe you can help me learn everyone else's name." 9 Juan laughed. "I'm new, too, Annie!" he said. "So I don't know everyone's name yet. But at lunch, maybe you and I can meet people together. I'll remember some names, and you'll remember others. Maybe, between the two of us, we can make new friends." 10 "I think I've already made one new friend," said Annie. "His name is Juan!" The author organizes paragraphs 4 through 6 in “A Name for a Friend” by —
    • A. 

      Describing the sequence of events

    • B. 

      Comparing and contrasting how to find friends

    • C. 

      Ordering the importance of remembering names

    • D. 

      Identifying the cause and the effect of learning a name

  • 3. 
    Combs 1 Every morning, people comb their hair when they get up. What would they do without a comb? Would they just pile their hair on top of their heads and pin it up? Would they have to cut off all their hair? It’s hard to imagine what life would be like if there were no combs. 2 Scientists who look for and study objects from the past believe the first combs were used in Africa in about 4000 B.C. Those combs weren’t at all like the ones we use today. Those combs were actually dried backbones of fish. Many years later, people began making fancy combs with other materials. 3 In Egyptian tombs, scientists found combs that were also 6,000 years old. They were made in many different styles. Some had one row of teeth. Others had two or even three rows. Some combs had a row of fat teeth with another row of thinner teeth behind it. 4 People use many different kinds of combs in our country today. They use combs of many different sizes, shapes and colors. There are combs made of plastic, metal, and wood. There are even electric combs. Combs are used not only to get the tangles out of hair, but also to create many fashionable hairstyles. People even use combs to get the snarls out of their pets’ hair. 5 Combs have come a long way, and people have come up with many different styles and uses for combs. Without them, who knows what we would look like today? The author organizes paragraphs 2 through 4 of the article by —
    • A. 

      Comparing combs of Egypt with combs in America

    • B. 

      Presenting kinds of combs in the order they were used throughout history

    • C. 

      Answering the questions introduced in the first paragraph

    • D. 

      Listing all of the types of combs that scientists have found in Africa

  • 4. 
    Please Do Not Feed The Animals 1 Suppose you see a mother and baby raccoon going through your trash one night. You know that you will not enjoy cleaning up the mess that they are making, but it is fun to watch them. Maybe you get an idea to feed the raccoons, so that can watch them more often. The next night you put out some sandwiches. Stop right there! 2 According to the National Wildlife Federation, many people think that by feeding wild animals they are helping the creatures. But, there are many reasons why people should not feed wild animals. 3 Wild animals are just that - wild. They live in their natural homes, hunt to find food, and distrust people. When people feed wild animals, they are teaching them to depend on people rather than what nature tells them to do. The animals become lazy. They come to humans looking for food rather than hunting to find their own food. 4 Another problem is that these animals become tame. They get used to living with humans. That means they will come close to cars, homes, and people to beg for food. While this may seem like fun, it can be dangerous for both the animal and the human. 5 When wild animals learn that some humans will give them food, they start to expect, and demand, it. When they see a human they expect to be fed. A wild goose, looking for food, might chase a person. Squirrels have been known to run up a person's pant leg looking for food. Bears come around campsites searching for food. 6 Another reason not to feed wild animals is that some human foods are dangerous to animals. Most animals are not used to eating large quantities of salt and sugar. When we give wild animals our food we are introducing their bodies to foods that can make them sick, or even kill them. 7 If all these reasons are not enough, then think about this fact: if you are in a National Park, and you feed a wild animal, you can be fined as much as $500. Most park rangers are disinterested in giving out fines. They know that many people think that they are helping animals by feeding them. But when people are breaking the rules, it is the job of the ranger to protect both the animals and other people. 8 The National Wildlife Federation suggests that kids learn to help animals by doing something other than feeding them. They suggest that kids join a club where they can learn about animals. The zoo is a good place to see many wild animals up close. There are many ways to support wildlife, but feeding wild animals is not helpful. In "Please Do Not Feed the Animals", the author organized the information by —
    • A. 

      Stating the idea and then giving reasons and facts

    • B. 

      Putting events in the order they occurred

    • C. 

      Giving facts and then stating reasons

    • D. 

      Putting it into a story

  • 5. 
    Welcoming the New Year 1 In the United States, people celebrate the beginning of the New Year on January 1. The midwinter festivities include parties, noise making, and singing. People say goodbye to the Old Year and welcome the New Year. 2 Not everyone in the world celebrates the beginning of a new year at the same time, or in the same way. Some New Year’s celebrations occur in spring, while others are in summer or fall. These celebrations are made up of different customs and activities. Spring 3 The people of Iran welcome the New Year on the first day of spring. They call the holiday Nouruz, which means “new day.” A few weeks before the New Year begins, people plant wheat and lentil seeds. At the end of the holiday celebration, people take their new plants and toss them into a river or stream. They believe this ceremony helps rid bad luck from the past year, and bring good luck for the next. Summer 4 The people of Ghana welcome the New Year in the middle of August. Homowo takes place at harvest time and lasts for four days. Family and friends get together and feast on corn, nuts, and fish. They sprinkle food on the ground in honor of relatives. Homowo is the new year of the crops. Fall 5 The people of Ethiopia welcome the New Year at the end of the rainy season. Equatash takes place in the middle of September. The night before Equatash, people light branches and carry them to church. They jump over the branches to mark a new beginning. The morning of Equatash, people “wash away the past” by submerging their body in a nearby river or lake. Winter 6 The people of Japan welcome the New Year on January 1. Oshogatsu is the largest holiday celebration in Japan. Peopledecorate their homes with symbols of good luck. Rice and straw are hung on doors to keep bad luck away. In some parts of Japan, it is a custom that children and adults receive a doll with no eyes painted on. They make a wish and paint one eye on the doll. The second eye is painted on during the year, after their wish has come true. 7 Different countries and cultures have different ways of welcoming, and celebrating, the New Year. Even though the holiday customs may be different, people all seem to put the past behind them, and look ahead to the future. The author in "Welcoming the New Year" organized the information by —
    • A. 

      Putting the country names in order by their first letter

    • B. 

      Separating the different holidays by custom

    • C. 

      Talking about the more common countries first

    • D. 

      Separating the different holidays by season