Quiz: How Well Do You Know New York Divorce Law?

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By AdewumiKoju
A
AdewumiKoju
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 811 | Total Attempts: 947,905
Questions: 15 | Attempts: 110

SettingsSettingsSettings
Quiz: How Well Do You Know New York Divorce Law? - Quiz

Dive into the intricacies of divorce law in New York with our comprehensive New York Divorce Law Quiz! Test your knowledge of legal procedures, spousal support, child custody, and more. Whether you're well-versed in family law or exploring the basics, this quiz offers an engaging challenge. Navigate through questions crafted to assess your understanding of the nuanced regulations governing divorce in the Empire State.

Sharpen your legal acumen and discover facets you might not have explored. Ready to unveil your expertise? Take the New York Divorce Law Quiz now and see how confidently you can maneuver the legal landscape of Read moremarital dissolution in the state.


New York Divorce Law Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    When did no-fault divorce become law in New York?

    • A.

      August 15, 2010

    • B.

      July 1, 2010

    • C.

      June 30, 2010

    • D.

      August 1, 2010

    Correct Answer
    A. August 15, 2010
    Explanation
    No-fault divorce became law in New York on August 15, 2010, when Governor David Paterson signed the bill. This marked a significant shift in divorce laws, allowing couples to divorce without proving fault-based criteria or separation. The change aimed to simplify the divorce process and bring New York in line with other states that had already adopted no-fault divorce.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    What was New York's stance on no-fault divorce before 2010?

    • A.

      Strictly Prohibited 

    • B.

      Highly Encouraged

    • C.

      Not Recognized

    • D.

      Option Not Available

    Correct Answer
    C. Not Recognized
    Explanation
    Before 2010, New York did not recognize no-fault divorce. The only way to get a true “no fault” divorce was to enter into a separation agreement and wait one year to file for divorce. If a couple did not want to wait one year, they would have to agree to use one of the other “fault” grounds in order to get a divorce. This changed in 2010 when New York became the last state to allow no-fault divorce.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    What grounds are considered for at-fault divorce in New York?

    • A.

      Adultery, Cruel and Inhuman Treatment, Abandonment, Imprisonment

    • B.

      Irretrievable Breakdown, Separation

    • C.

      Mutual Consent, Unhappiness

    • D.

      Lack of Communication, Lifestyle Differences

    Correct Answer
    A. Adultery, Cruel and Inhuman Treatment, Abandonment, Imprisonment
    Explanation
    At-fault divorce in New York can be granted on grounds such as Adultery, Cruel and Inhuman Treatment, Abandonment, and Imprisonment. These fault-based criteria allow one party to accuse the other of wrongdoing, providing leverage in negotiations. The availability of at-fault grounds can impact the divorce settlement, as one party may use them to extract favorable terms from the other.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    What does "Cruel and Inhuman Treatment" include in divorce law?

    • A.

      Any form of disagreement between spouses

    • B.

      Domestic Violence, Extreme Mental Cruelty

    • C.

      Verbal Arguments, Neglect

    • D.

      Differences in Lifestyle Choices

    Correct Answer
    B. Domestic Violence, Extreme Mental Cruelty
    Explanation
    "Cruel and Inhuman Treatment" in divorce law includes behavior by the defendant that rises to a level making it improper for the plaintiff to continue residing with them. This encompasses actions like domestic violence and repeated, extreme mental cruelty. Allegations under this ground must provide evidence of such treatment, highlighting the seriousness of the accusations in the divorce proceedings.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    What is the new ground for no-fault divorce in New York since 2010?

    • A.

      Irretrievable Breakdown for at least six months

    • B.

      Infidelity for more than a year

    • C.

      Mutual Consent for at least a year

    • D.

      Financial Disagreements for at least six months

    Correct Answer
    A. Irretrievable Breakdown for at least six months
    Explanation
    The new ground for no-fault divorce in New York since 2010 is that the relationship between husband and wife has broken down irretrievably for a period of at least six months. This allows couples to divorce without assigning blame and is a significant departure from the previous fault-based system, providing a more amicable and streamlined process for ending marriages.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    How long must spouses live apart for a "Separation Agreement" divorce?

    • A.

      Six months

    • B.

      One year or more

    • C.

      Three months

    • D.

      Two years

    Correct Answer
    B. One year or more
    Explanation
    For a "Separation Agreement" divorce, spouses must not have lived together for at least one year. This period of physical separation, combined with a signed "Agreement of Separation," serves as grounds for divorce. The one-year requirement reflects the legal recognition of a sustained separation as a valid reason for divorce, allowing couples time to decide on the terms of their separation before formally ending the marriage.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    What is the process for a Contested Divorce in New York?

    • A.

      Jury Decides Grounds, Judge Decides Ancillary Relief

    • B.

      Jury Decides Ancillary Relief, Judge Decides Grounds

    • C.

      Judge Decides Grounds, Jury Decides Ancillary Relief

    • D.

      Judge Decides Grounds, Jury Decides Ancillary Relief

    Correct Answer
    A. Jury Decides Grounds, Judge Decides Ancillary Relief
    Explanation
    In a Contested Divorce in New York, the jury decides the grounds for divorce, while the judge decides all other ancillary relief. This means that the judge is responsible for determining issues such as child custody, visitation rights, spousal support, and the division of property, ensuring an equitable resolution. The jury's role is limited to establishing the grounds for the divorce.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    What happens if the defendant in a divorce case does not answer legal pleadings?

    • A.

      Immediate Granting of Divorce by Default

    • B.

      Request for Mediation by the Judge

    • C.

      Dismissal of the Case

    • D.

      Request for a Jury Trial

    Correct Answer
    A. Immediate Granting of Divorce by Default
    Explanation
    If the defendant in a divorce case does not answer legal pleadings, the plaintiff may seek a default judgment, leading to the immediate granting of the divorce by default. This legal recourse allows the divorce proceedings to move forward in the absence of a response from the defendant, streamlining the process for cases where one party does not contest the divorce.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    What residency conditions must be satisfied for New York State Supreme Court jurisdiction?

    • A.

      Marriage Ceremony in NY, Residency for One Year

    • B.

      Living as Husband and Wife in NY for One Year

    • C.

      Grounds for Divorce in NY, Residency for One Year

    • D.

      Marriage Ceremony in NY, Residency for Six Months

    Correct Answer
    D. Marriage Ceremony in NY, Residency for Six Months
    Explanation
    To have jurisdiction, New York State Supreme Court requires residency conditions such as the marriage ceremony being performed in NY, residency for one year, or living as husband and wife in NY for one year before the divorce action begins. Meeting these residency criteria establishes the court's authority to handle divorce cases involving the respective parties.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    What are the three key issues when children are involved in a divorce or separation?

    • A.

      Child Custody, Child Support, Visitation Rights

    • B.

      Property Division, Alimony, Legal Fees

    • C.

      Name Change, Residency, Ancillary Relief

    • D.

      Grounds for Divorce, Mediation, Custody

    Correct Answer
    A. Child Custody, Child Support, Visitation Rights
    Explanation
    The three key issues when children are involved in a divorce or separation are Child Custody, Child Support, and Visitation Rights. These critical aspects aim to ensure the well-being and proper care of the children, addressing physical custody, decision-making authority, visitation schedules, and financial support. Resolving these issues is crucial for creating a stable environment for the children post-divorce.

    Rate this question:

  • 11. 

    How is child support determined in New York?

    • A.

      Fixed Percentage of Income Based on Number of Children

    • B.

      Flat Monthly Fee per Child

    • C.

      Based on the Custodial Parent's Income

    • D.

      Percentage Based on Custodial Parent's Income

    Correct Answer
    D. Percentage Based on Custodial Parent's Income
    Explanation
    Child support in New York is determined based on a percentage of the custodial parent's income. The state's Child Support Standards Act establishes this formula, with payments being 17% for one child and 25% for two children. The calculation ensures financial support for the child or children and helps maintain a standard for child support payments in divorce cases.

    Rate this question:

  • 12. 

    What does equitable distribution determine in divorce cases?

    • A.

      Child Custody

    • B.

      Division of Property

    • C.

      Spousal Support

    • D.

      Legal Fees

    Correct Answer
    B. Division of Property
    Explanation
    Equitable distribution in New York determines the fair division of property at the end of a marriage. The court examines thirteen factors to decide how property accumulated during the marriage and the parties' debts should be divided. While equal distribution is the norm, the court may consider factors such as egregious misconduct or business interests when determining a fair distribution.

    Rate this question:

  • 13. 

    What is spousal support known as in New York?

    • A.

      Alimony

    • B.

      Maintenance

    • C.

      Child Support

    • D.

      Legal Fees

    Correct Answer
    B. Maintenance
    Explanation
    Spousal support is known as "maintenance" or "spousal support" in New York. Unlike child support, which follows a set formula, spousal support calculations depend on various factors such as the income disparity between parties, the duration of the marriage, the health of the parties, and the presence of young children. It is generally awarded for a set period, allowing the receiving party time to readjust post-divorce.

    Rate this question:

  • 14. 

    Under what circumstances is spousal support rarely granted on a permanent basis?

    • A.

      Physical or Mental Disability, Elderly Parties

    • B.

      Short-Term Marriages, No Children

    • C.

      Mutual Agreement of the Parties

    • D.

      No Specific Circumstances

    Correct Answer
    A. Physical or Mental Disability, Elderly Parties
    Explanation
    Spousal support in New York is rarely granted on a permanent basis except in cases of physical or mental disability or when the parties are elderly (about 60 years old or older). This reflects the court's consideration of specific circumstances that warrant long-term support, ensuring fairness and support for individuals facing challenges due to disability or advanced age.

    Rate this question:

  • 15. 

    When can a court order one spouse to pay the other's legal fees in a divorce?

    • A.

      Based on Income Disparity, Temporary or Final Basis

    • B.

      Only at the Beginning of the Suit

    • C.

      Only at the End of the Suit

    • D.

      Regardless of Income Disparity

    Correct Answer
    A. Based on Income Disparity, Temporary or Final Basis
    Explanation
    A court can order one spouse to pay the other's legal fees in a divorce based on income disparity, either on a temporary or final basis. This provision ensures that both parties have access to legal representation, promoting fairness in the legal process. The court considers the financial circumstances of each party and may order the spouse with greater income or assets to contribute to the other's legal fees.

    Rate this question:

Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.