What Major Should I Choose In College? Quiz

9 Questions | Total Attempts: 232

What Major Should I Choose In College? Quiz - Quiz

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You May Get

Culinary Arts

The Next Iron Chef? With an interest in working with your hands, being on your feet, and serving others, a major in culinary arts might be for you! Culinary arts majors learn a great deal about food preparation and the hospitality industry generally, including courses in technology, hospitality operations, and accounting. Be careful, however, the restaurant industry is very competitive, requires very long hours, and doesn’t pay much unless and until you ascend the ranks. If you have any aptitude for science, you may want to consider majoring in chemistry – it also allows you to be on your feet and work with your hands, is excellent preparation if you eventually want to focus on molecular gastronomy (i.e. applying scientifically knowledgeable to novel cooking techniques), and can serve as a great option for other careers if you ever need to get another kind of job. All that said, if food is your passion, we say go for it! Just remember to invite us to dinner! Other majors you might consider:  Graphic Design, Chemistry, Molecular Biology, History, Psychology, Sociology

Drama

“We’d like to thank the Academy…” With an expressive personality and a desire to have attention upon you, a drama major might be your thing!  As a drama major, you’ll take courses in acting, voice, movement, staging, directing, and many others. Be careful, however: while dreams of stardom abound, the theatre and film industries are highly competitive, and – unless you’re the 1 in a million that makes it big – most actors and actresses don’t make much money, and many have to take second jobs to pay the bills. Given that, we might recommend actively pursuing your acting career but actually majoring in something else that would help you get a better-paying job just as a ‘day job’ until you hit the big time. Just remember to invite us to the premier! Other majors you might consider:  English, History, Political Science, Sociology, Journalism, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Accounting, Marketing

Information Technology

Just do IT. With an interest in technology and skill in working with your hands, a major in information technology (IT) might be the one for you! As an IT major, you’ll gain hands-on, real-world practical skills in building and administering complex IT systems: tasks like building and configuring networks and routers, setting up shared file systems, managing internet security, and much more. You’ll take courses in math, databases, programming, and others. IT majors – particularly those with additional certifications like the CCNA or Microsoft Certification – are in high demand in nearly every business today, making it easier to find (and keep!) a job. Given the rapid changes in technology today, IT professionals need to be comfortable learning new skills constantly, so a willingness to learn new things is definitely required. However, for those with the interest and inclination, it can be a very rewarding, stable profession….plus someone can then finally help us figure out how to update our anti-virus! Other majors you might consider:  Network Administration, Computer Science, Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Psychology, Occupational Therapy

Music

Ah, glorious music! With a passion for the arts and expression and the discipline to bring them to fruition, a major in music might be for you! As a music major, you’ll take our courses in music composition, theory, and performance in addition to a standard liberal arts curriculum. You’ll be able to hone your craft and prepare yourself for a career as a performer, composer, or numerous other positions. Be careful, however: music majors are often not seen as having a ‘leg up’ in hiring for many non-music related jobs, and getting a job in academia usually require an advanced degree. As an option, you may want to consider minoring in music while majoring in something that can give you a fall-back option to help you get a day job until you get your break. If you know you’re fully committed to making music your life, however, we say go for it! Just remember to get us front row seats! Other majors you might consider:  Drama, Culinary Arts, Occupational Therapy, Nursing, Accounting, Information Technology, Philosophy, History

Philosophy

Cogito ergo… major in Philosophy! With an incisive, logical mind and a deep desire to understand the true meaning of things, a philosophy major might be for you! Literally meaning “a love of knowledge”, Philosophy majors learn to think about and analyze some of life’s biggest questions such as “what do we mean when we say something is ‘true’?” or “what is the proper role of government?”, or “how can we be certain whether something is moral or not?” Sure, while your friends in engineering or the sciences may say you aren’t being “practical”, don’t be fooled: philosophy can be an extremely intellectually-demanding major, requiring careful, diligent reading of difficult texts, very strong analytical and logical skills, and an ability to write clearly about difficult and abstract topics. We liken it to “physics with words”. Be careful, however: because philosophy majors don’t come away with readily apparent practical skills, it can sometimes be difficult to land that first job. Don’t let that discourage you, however! If you have a real interest and willingness to engage with the material, you will gain invaluable skills that will help you in your career and – even more importantly – living a meaningful life. Other majors, you might consider:  History, Anthropology, Physics, Math, Computer Science, Music, Systems Engineering, Political Science

Architecture

Ah, to build the great buildings of the world! With your penchant for design and aesthetics combined with a talent for math and engineering, the architecture might be just the major for you! With classes engineering to design and combining both “left-brain” and “right-brain” skills, architecture majors will develop a wide range of skills that are valuable in many fields. Be careful, however: architecture is a highly-competitive field, with demand for new architects highly dependent upon the broader economy. It can be very difficult to get a job in the field, so you may also want to consider majoring in a related field like civil engineering that can give you more options while minoring in architecture to demonstrate your interest in the field. However, if you are committed to architecture and are willing to work hard both in-studio and in the classroom, we say go for it - we’ll call you when we need our new house built! Other majors you might consider:  Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Design, Physics, Graphic Design, History

Physics

What can we say? Sir Issac's got nothing on you! You're the king (or queen) of kinetics, the vicar of vectors, the... well, you get the idea. With a penchant for math and the sciences and a great head on your shoulders, you’re perfectly suited to tackle one of the most intellectually-challenging majors out there. Physics majors hone their understanding of the natural world around them from the most basic physical laws. The advanced math and rigorous thinking skills you’ll develop will prepare you for virtually any intellectually-demanding field. Physics majors can be found in finance, engineering, business, science, medicine, law – you name it. And for those uber-nerds (and we mean that it the most flattering way possible!) who are considering grad school in engineering or the sciences, majoring in physics can often give you a leg up by helping you really getting a firm grasp of the underlying physical principles. And compared to some other, less (ahem) ‘physical’ fields like math or computer science, the experimental side of physics gives you a chance to get in the lab and actually do stuff with your hands. Just make sure you get outside every once in awhile – sunlight is good for you! Other majors, you might consider mechanical engineering, mathematics, civil engineering, electrical engineering, aerospace engineering.

Math

You’re number e^iπ! We dare anyone to out-nerd you – and we mean that in the most flattering way possible!  With a penchant for math and a brilliant abstract mind, you might have what it takes to be a math major. While not for those afraid of hard work, majoring in math gives equips you with the thinking tools that can benefit you in many careers. Math majors can be found in finance, engineering, business, science, medicine, law – you name it. Unlike other math-heavy sciences like Physics, the math doesn’t require much more than your brain, pencil, paper…and a computer (calculators included.) Bonus? Math and Physics majors can bond over teasing the engineers over their ‘safety major’. Just make sure you get outside once in a while – your body needs exercise too! Other majors you might consider: physics, financial engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, industrial engineering, actuarial science.

Computer Science

Hello World! With a strong logical mind and an interest in learning how to program, computer science might just be the ticket for you. More than just learning how to program, computer science majors learn how to break down larger problems step by step and think about the best ways to solve a given problem – valuable in any field, not just as a programmer. Though you may still be required to take basic science lab courses as a computer science major, unlike more ‘hands-on’ fields like physics, chemistry, or engineering, most computer science can be done sitting in front of a….well, you know. Computer science majors are is super high demand right now in the workforce, so if you work hard and do well…there will almost certainly be jobs for you! Whether you want to go into academia, work at Google, or develop the next Flappy Bird, computer science is where it’s at! Just make sure you get outside once in a while – once you start dreaming in code, you know you need to take a break…  Other majors you might consider: Math, Finance, Financial Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering / Operations Research, Information Technology.

Electrical Engineering

V=IR? Sounds A-OK! With a strong aptitude in math and an interest in electronics, Electrical Engineering might be just the major for you! Encompassing everything from signal processing and circuit design to engineering power lines, electrical engineers learn how to harness electromagnetism to transmit and process information and power. One of the most intellectually-demanding majors, electrical engineering will teach you in-depth mathematics, rigorous logic, and the basis for how almost all modern gadgetry is made from cell phones to power lines. Like most engineering disciplines, electrical engineering gives you a good blend of theory and hands-on practical lab experience, leans more heavily on abstract mathematics than more ‘tangible’ engineering majors like mechanical or civil. While of course great if you want to be an engineer, the mathematical and logical skills you learn as an electrical engineering major will well prepare you for careers in finance, medicine, law, business, or any field where strong analytical skills are needed. Sure your “dork rating” might go up by a few points, but you’ll get the last laugh as you find it easier to get a job than your English-major friends! Other majors you might consider: Physics, Maths, Financial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Systems Engineering, Philosophy.

Mechanical Engineering

Okay, so maybe you’re not quite Tony Stark, but with a strong aptitude for math and physics and an interest in how machines work, mechanical engineering might be for you! Drawing from a broad range of fields including physics, math, materials science, and others, mechanical engineering majors learn how to build complex machines, whether robots or racecars. Like most engineering disciplines, mechanical engineering gives you a good blend of theory and hands-on practical lab experience and will teach you in-depth mathematics, rigorous logic, an intuitive sense of physics. Unlike more abstract types of engineering like electrical, mechanical engineers benefit from a strong ability to visualize things in their mind clearly, and benefit from a strong visual/spatial sense. While of course great if you want to be an engineer, the mathematical and logical skills you learn as an electrical engineering major will well prepare you for careers in finance, medicine, law, business, or any field where strong analytical skills are needed. Sure your “dork rating” might go up by a few points, but you’ll get the last laugh as you find it easier to get a job than your English-major friends! Other majors, you might consider:  Electrical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Systems Engineering, Materials Science, Physics

Civil Engineering

Want to build towering skyscrapers? Island-spanning bridges? How about massive power-generating dams? With an aptitude for math and an interest in building some of the world’s most awe-inspiring structures, civil engineering might be just the major for you!  Drawing from a broad range of fields including physics, math, materials science, and others, mechanical engineering majors learn how to build complex machines, whether robots or racecars. While of course great if you want to be an engineer, the mathematical and logical skills you learn as an electrical engineering major will well prepare you for careers in finance, medicine, law, business, or any field where strong analytical skills are needed. Like most engineering disciplines, mechanical engineering gives you a good blend of theory and hands-on practical lab experience and will teach you in-depth mathematics, rigorous logic, an intuitive sense of physics. Unlike more abstract types of engineering like electrical, civil engineers benefit from a strong ability to visualize things in their mind clearly, and benefit from a strong visual/spatial sense. They also tend to get out ‘into the field’ – visiting construction sites; this ain’t no microprocessor clean room – this is big, real-world stuff! Other majors you might consider:  Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science.

Systems / Industrial Engineering

What the heck is Systems Engineering? Probably one of the least-well known types of engineering (though we don’t know why!), systems / industrial engineering (also known often as operations research) is all about making systems more stable and more efficient – whether improving speed or quality on a manufacturing line at Ford, figuring out the optimal way to sort and ship millions of packages at Amazon or how you should stock the shelves as Macy’s. There are many industrial and military applications too – after revolutionizing production at General Motors in the 1940s, operations research methods were used to optimally deploy and manage troops and weaponry during World War II. More than most other engineering disciplines, operations research emphasizes statistics and probability as well as human psychology (humans are parts of systems too!), and is particularly good training for individuals with a mathematical aptitude that are interested in business or any area where managing large, complex organizations is required. Sure, you may get some flack from your other engineering friends that IE or OR (as it’s often called) isn’t really engineering, but pay them no mind – you’ll need their help if you want to build a better mousetrap…but they’ll need yours if they want to actually ship a million of them! Other majors, you might consider:  Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Financial Engineering, Math, Psychology, Actuarial Science

Chemical Engineering

A chemistry and math wiz? Huzzah! The difference between chemistry and chemical engineering? Chemistry will give you the skills to invent a new cancer drug; chemical engineering will teach how to mass-produce it. Think of it as chemistry + math. With an aptitude in math, and interest in science, and a willingness to get ‘hands-on’ with lab work, chemical engineering might be the major for you. Like most engineering disciplines, chemical engineering gives you a good blend of theory and hands-on practical lab experience and will teach you in-depth mathematics, rigorous logic, an in-depth grounding in chemistry and physics. While of course great if you want to be an engineer, the mathematical and logical skills you learn as an electrical engineering major will well prepare you for careers in finance, medicine, law, business, or any field where strong analytical skills are needed. Chemical engineers have one of the highest median starting salaries of majors. Sure, some may call you a dork, but you’ll likely have the last laugh…all the way to the bank! Other majors you might consider:  Chemistry, Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Physics, Math.

Financial Engineering

Financial engineers are the weathermen of engineers…they’re always making it rain. Financial engineering deals with one thing: cheddar. Sure, they might talk about it differently using terms like ‘risk’ and ‘return’, but at the end of the day, it comes down to the green stuff. With your aptitude for math and interest in business and finance (or your desire to make a buck!), a financial engineering major might be for you! Financial engineering is similar to a finance major, adds additional rigor of further advanced math (particularly statistics and probability) and computer science. Unlike most other engineering majors, there’s not a lot of tangible ‘hands-on’ lab activities, but they're often is a good deal of programming involved. While of course perfect for finance jobs, the mathematical, financial, and programming skills you learn as an electrical engineering major will well prepare you for careers in law, business, or any field where strong analytical skills are needed. Sure, you may get some flack from your other engineering friends financing engineering isn’t really engineering, but pay them no mind –, but you’ll likely have the last laugh…all the way to the bank! Other majors, you might consider:  Computer Science, Math, Finance, Physics, Actuarial Science, Accounting

Marketing

Apple. Nike. Disney. Coke. These companies all have one thing in common: great marketing. No matter whether part a company, a non-profit organization or even an author or movie star, if you want people to know who you are or what you do, marketing matters. Marketing covers such a broach range of topics and needs people of such widely varying skills that if you any interest in why people buy the things they do and how to influence them, marketing could be for you! Have a penchant for the power of words? Marketing could use you as a copywriter. Have any interest in graphic design? Consider working in the creative department of a marketing firm. Maybe you’re more of a numbers person? Consider market research or marketing analytics. Maybe your more of a ‘big picture’ kind of person – may be marketing strategy is right for you. Because there are so many areas within marketing, marketing majors learn a little about all of them, giving them skills in writing, communication, math, business, psychology and more. Because marketing is such a popular major, it can sometimes be difficult to differentiate yourself from other marketing majors when looking for that first job. However, if you can land that first job and work hard, you can rise the ranks of the corporate ladder! Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, Psychology, Accounting, Actuarial Science, English, History.

Accounting

You got a mind fo’ yo’ money, and money on yo’ mind! With your aptitude for numbers, your interest in business and/or finance, and strong attention to detail, accounting might just be your jam! Famous investor Warren Buffett calls accounting the “language of business”; as an accounting major, you’ll learn a lot about business, law, finance, investing….and of course accounting! The skills you’ll learn as an accounting major will help you in many fields you may consider later…though many accounting majors eventually join accounting firms and become CPAs or Certified Public Accountants. For those interested in finance or investing the foundational skills, you’ll learn as an accounting major will serve you well! Accounting majors – and particularly those who go on to get their CPA – are always in high demand…so if you want to always be sure that you’ll both make money and know exactly where it goes, and accounting major might be the thing for you! Sure, it isn’t always the sexiest major out there, but when your sociology major friend is teasing you know, just remember you’ll probably have the last laugh….all the way to the bank! Other majors you might consider:  Finance, Marketing, Actuarial Science, Nursing, Information Technology

Psychology

You mind-reader, you! Okay, not quite – but with your interest in how people think and why they do the things they do, psychology might just be the major for you! Psychology majors often take courses in neuroanatomy and neuroscience (how the brain is organized and works at a biological level) and social psychology (how people think and react in different situations.) As a psychology major, you’ll gain critical reading and thinking skills, a solid grounding in biology and scientific reasoning, and skills in academic writing. Because of its broad scope and inherent interestingness, psychology is often one of the most popular majors on college campuses. Be careful, however – unless you are willing to go to grad school, it is difficult to differentiate yourself as a psychology major when applying for jobs, so psychology majors often have more difficulty landing that first job without some other way of distinguishing yourself. With that said, if you can’t imagine doing anything else, go for it! Just don’t be surprised when, after you tell them you majored in psychology, they inevitably ask if you’re analyzing them (which of course you will be….but we won’t tell!) Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, Marketing, Environmental Science, Biology, Neuroscience, Political Science, Journalism

Nursing

You caretaker, you! With an interest in science, and a desire to help people in a meaningful way while having a job that gets you up and moving, a major in nursing might just be for you! Nursing majors gain a fundamental grounding in many of the sciences, including basic physics and chemistry, and – of course – biology. They also learn much critical thinking and practical, hands-on skills of what it takes to be a nurse; not only technical skills (like how to use equipment) but also soft-skills (like dealing with the emotional side of patient care.) Nurses are often in high demand across the country, so getting a job (and having a job no matter where you go) is often easier than with other majors, starting salaries are usually quite good, and job security is high. What’s not to love? Be careful, however: hospital nurses often work long hours (12-hour shifts are not uncommon), sometimes work night-shifts, and weekends and holidays (people need care year-round!). Moreover, though starting salaries and job security are high, without going back to grad school, the future income potential is limited. However, for those with the right temperament, high energy, and for those who love helping others, nursing can be a highly-rewarding profession! Other majors you might consider:  Occupational Therapy, Social Work, Biology, Chemistry, Education

English

Thou art a Master of Language! With a love for the written and spoken word (and no fear of long books or papers!), an English major might just be the thing for you! As an English major, you’ll get a chance to delve into some of the world’s great literature and hone your abilities to read, write, and speak well. English majors hone their communication skills – something that’s valuable in nearly every profession, but particularly beneficial in fields like journalism, law, marketing, or teaching. Beware, however: if you’re going into other fields, as an English major it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish yourself and land that first job. That said, if you’re passionate about what you do, we say go for it! Sure, you might make a little less than your engineering major friends right out of school, but in a few years those differences will likely even out, and you’ll have enriched your soul with some of the world’s finest art. Well-played! Other majors you might consider:  Foreign Languages, History, Education, Political Science, Philosophy, Journalism

Political Science

All the world’s a stage! Given your comfort with reading and writing and your interest in people in humanity as a whole, a political science major might be right for you! As a political science major, you will learn about difficult theories of power, the role of government, and how societies are organized. You will hone your knowledge of history, economics, and of human psychology, as well as your critical reading and writing skills: valuable skills in nearly any career, but particularly those in politics, economics, journalism, or other areas in the public domain. Be careful, however: it may be more difficult to differentiate yourself right out of school and land that first job. But don’t worry: over time political science majors’ salaries do quite well, so go for it! Just don’t forget us when you’re President! Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, History, English, Psychology, Journalism

Journalism

The pen is mightier than the sword!  With a penchant for the written word, an abundance of energy, and a willingness to ask the difficult questions, a major in journalism might be for you! As a journalism major, you’ll hone your research, interview, and writing skills, as well as develop a critical, incisive mind – all useful as a journalist, of course, but in many other fields as well. Be careful, however: journalism is a hyper-competitive field, which can make it difficult to land that first job. Don’t let that deter you, however! Journalists play a key role in a free society, and we need all the help we can get – just remember us when you receive your Pulitzer! Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, History, English, Psychology, Political Science

Economics

Give yourself an (invisible) hand! With your strong conceptual skills, comfort with math, and interest in how things work, an economics major might be for you! More than the just study of money, economics is really the study of how we allocate any limited resource. As an economics major, you’ll typically study both microeconomics (i.e. how individual people, companies or small groups allocate resources), and macroeconomics (i.e. how those individuals or groups combine together to create national and global economies.) Economics majors develop analytical and critical thinking skills, as well as skills in both advanced mathematics (calculus and statistics are often used) and psychology (to understand how people act and make decisions in different situations.)  Economics majors get jobs in all varieties of fields: public policy, finance, business, law, medicine…you name it! The skills you develop as an economics major can be used in almost any field, and in many jobs, the pay can be quite good. Economics is often a popular major on college campuses (particularly introductory courses like Econ 101), but don’t let that deter you! Sure some of your engineering friends might tease you about econ not being a “real” science, but you can have the last laugh when you’re running the company! Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, Psychology, Journalism, Accounting, Political Science

Education / Teaching

There’s nothing funny here – educators rule! With a love of learning and helping others, a major in education might be just right for you! As an education major, you’ll learn about psychology, sociology, organizational dynamics, child development, and a host of other things. While of course useful as a teacher or educator, the skills you learn as an education major can be helpful in a variety of fields. Be careful, however: while if you are absolutely sure that you want to be a pre-college educator and education degree can be great training, for many other jobs it may be difficult to distinguish yourself and get that first job. Moreover, starting salaries for educators can vary dramatically, and it is often difficult to rise in the ranks (and in pay!) without additional schooling. That said, being an educator can be an incredibly rewarding (and much needed!) profession….plus, what other job allows you to have the summer off!? Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, Psychology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, History, English, Math, Chemistry, Political Science

Sociology

“Sociology is the most humanistic of the sciences, and most scientific of the humanities.” With your interest in human behavior and different cultures, a major in sociology or anthropology might be for you! Many colleges offer only anthropology or sociology; very broadly anthropology deals with various cultures throughout history in a broader, more conceptual level, while sociology focuses more or recent and current cultural and human behaviors and is more quantitative and data-focused. Be careful, however: without attending grad school or law school, it can often be difficult to distinguish yourself and land your first job, and the average starting salary for those who do get jobs right out of undergrad is not high. That said if you have a passion and interest, and particularly if you’re dedicated to going into the field, go for it! Other majors you might consider:  Psychology, Journalism, Economics, History, English, Systems Engineering

Molecular Biology

”We’re sure you’re just pre-med for the fun of it…”  With a keen intellect and a love of science (or at least a desire to go to med school), molecular biology might just be the major for you! Molecular biology gives you a good blend of theory and hands-on practical lab experience and will give you a solid grounding in chemistry, biology, and even some physics.  A common major for pre-med students, molecular biology is also great preparation for any career in the sciences, including business (pharmaceuticals, biotech, etc.) and law (particularly patent law). Because there are so many pre-med students in this major, competition for grades is usually particularly fierce, but if you’re interested, don’t let that stop you! Sure, your friends in the humanities may call you a ‘science geek’, but let them: you’ll likely have the last-laugh, Doctor! Other majors you might consider:  Chemistry, Neuroscience, Physics, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Psychology

Biology / Environmental Science

Save the planet! With an interest in science and a passion for environmental causes, biology or environmental science major might just be your thing! Unlike molecular biology (which is focused mainly on the underlying chemistry of living organisms), macrobiology is focused on the “bigger” systems – different types of plants and animals, how different ecosystems work, and the anatomy and function of different systems in the body. As a biology major, you’ll learn critical thinking skills, how to think scientifically, and how to use your powers of observation – useful skills in any field you might enter. Be careful, however: unless you have a graduate degree, it can often be difficult to distinguish yourself and get that first job. That being said, if you’re passionate and interested in the subject matter, we say go ahead! Other majors you might consider:  Systems Engineering, Psychology, Molecular Biology, History, Occupational Therapy

Chemistry

You’re a regular Walter White! (You know…minus the whole ‘drug dealer’ thing…) With an ability to think logically, an interest in science, and a desire not to sit on your butt all day, a chemistry major might be just right for you! As a chemistry major, you’ll split your time between hitting the books and working in the lab. Chemistry is a broad field, so don’t let one good (or bad) course sway you too much. For those who like puzzles and an interest in biology, organic chemistry might be your particular interest; for those with a mathematical bent, physical chemistry might be your jam. Be careful, however: most higher-paying jobs in chemistry will require a Ph.D.; if that’s not of interest and you’re not afraid of a little math, consider majoring in chemical engineering – the course work is similar with more of an emphasis on math, but they pay for an undergraduate can be significantly higher. That said, if you would seriously consider grad school, or if you just have a deep passion for chemistry, then we say go for it! Just stay away from the meth, ok? Other majors, you might consider:   Chemical Engineering, Molecular Biology, Physics, Math, Mechanical Engineering

History

A famous man once said, “those who fail to understand the past are doomed to repeat it.” Well, that won’t be a problem for you! With no fear of reading and writing and a broad interest in people and society, a history major might be for you! At its most basic, history is the study of past events to understand their causes, and the patterns that recur throughout the history of mankind. History majors spend a lot of time reading and writing, and often act as a kind of ‘detective’, seeking to piece together the past through clues still remaining today. The skills developed by history majors – strong reading and writing skills, and ability to read texts carefully and analyze them critically, and attention to detail, and abroad, historical perspective – are valuable in any field, particular those fields that deal with larger groups of people such as management, marketing, public policy, politics, journalism, and the like. Be careful, however: because of its popularity as a major, it can often be difficult to distinguish yourself from others when trying to land that first job. If it’s your passion, don’t let that deter you, however! Particularly for those with the skills and talent necessary to rise to positions of influence, the historical context provided by an understanding of history can prove quite valuable later in one’s career. You know…like vampire slaying… Other majors you might consider:  Sociology, Political Science, Journalism, English, Psychology, Philosophy, Systems Engineering

Foreign Language

C’est la vie! With a penchant for language and an interest in foreign cultures, majoring in a foreign language might be for you! Studying a foreign language gives you more than just an ability to speak a 2nd language; it allows you to explore another culture, another history, and another way of seeing the world. Studies have shown that people fluent in two or more languages have a better ability to focus and plan long term, as well as a better ability to see a situation or issue from a different perspective. Of course, there are many languages to choose from, and which you choose should be a function of both your interests and what you intend to do with it. French, for example, is often the language of diplomacy; if you have international business aspirations, Mandarin Chinese would be a great choice! Be careful, however: unless you can find a job where fluency in another language is immediately relevant, it may sometimes be more difficult to land that first job. However, if you remain fluent and can find a job that leverages those skills, knowing multiple languages can definitely give you a significant advantage in your career. Other majors you might consider:  English, Sociology, History, Political Science, Philosophy, Journalism

Graphic Design

A picture’s worth a thousand words! With a strong visual sense and an interest in aesthetics, graphic design might be the major for you! As a graphic design major, you’ll take courses in 2D and 3D graphics, animation, typography, design theory, and more. Be careful, however: it can often be difficult to land the first job, and many graphic designers often do freelance work or take a second job to help pay their bills. You may want to consider a minor in marketing or some business-related fields to help improve your initial employability and start developing your own portfolio right away. If you have any mathematical skill, you may want to consider mechanical engineering or architecture, or possibly industrial design. That said, if you know this is your passion, advertising agencies and companies like Pixar are always looking for talented graphic designers, so don’t let anything stand in your way! Other majors you might consider:  Industrial Design, Architecture, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Science, Environmental Science
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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    How do you feel about calculus?
    • A. 

      Calclu-who?

    • B. 

      It's 'Aight

    • C. 

      I can do it if I have to...but I don't want to have to..

    • D. 

      I f(n) = love^it

  • 2. 
    Your professor assigns you to read a 300 page book and write a 10,000 word essay on it......due in two weeks.  Your reaction is...
    • A. 

      It'll be fine....if my other courses aren't too crazy...

    • B. 

      ...hello? Are you okay? I think you blacked out for a second there...

    • C. 

      Super easy! You've already read that book and written a postmodern critique of it on your daily blog...

    • D. 

      Um, sure...it'll be fine... ...they have Cliff Notes for that, right?

  • 3. 
    How much wood would a woodckuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
    • A. 

      Well, if I assume a woodchuck can chuck approximately 25% of its weight daily and the average woodchuck weighs approximately 8 pounds, then if I divide...

    • B. 

      If a woodchuck chucks wood in a forest but no one hears it...is there really such a thing as "wood"?

    • C. 

      It really depends on how the woodchuck's motivations...

    • D. 

      Yes.

  • 4. 
    Sitting at a desk reading, writing, or working at a computer all day everyday sound...
    • A. 

      ...like exactly what I want...

    • B. 

      ... doable...

    • C. 

      ...okay, but I'd rather be moving more...

    • D. 

      ...soul destroying...

  • 5. 
    Which fact about Chuck Norris is MOST true?
    • A. 

      When Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone, he had 3 missed calls from Chuck Norris.

    • B. 

      Chuck Norris doesn't need the period table - the only element he needs is the element of surprise.

    • C. 

      Chuck Norris doesn't call the wrong number. You answer the wrong phone.

    • D. 

      There is no theory of evolution. Just a list of animals Chuck Norris allows to live.

  • 6. 
    Being able to get a decent-paying job easily when you graduate...
    • A. 

      ...is my absolute #1 priority

    • B. 

      ...matters, but not as much as my long-term potential

    • C. 

      ...distracts people from focusing on true learning

    • D. 

      ...job? What job?

  • 7. 
    With which sense is the most beauty found?
    • A. 

      Sight

    • B. 

      Sound

    • C. 

      Taste

  • 8. 
    People...
    • A. 

      ...are fascinating

    • B. 

      ...keep me from doing real work

  • 9. 
    Be Honest: What Fulfills you the Most?
    • A. 

      Helping People

    • B. 

      Challenging Yourself Intellectually

    • C. 

      Expressing Yourself / Being Creative

    • D. 

      Understanding The World Around You

    • E. 

      Building Something Tangible

    • F. 

      Being Financially Well Off

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