Test Your English # 10 - Animal Idioms

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Test Your English # 10 - Animal Idioms - Quiz


Animal cliparts from https://www. Free-clipart-pictures. Net/animal_clipart. Html

Some of the sentences use informal language or terms mainly used in a variant of English.

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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    1. 'Sentimental Journey' was a War II song and the first time I sang it at rehearsal I knew it was going to be a smash hit. And, of course it was!The guys that were in the service, especially overseas, went ___ over it, and it became a huge hit for us.[Doris Day]

    • A.

      Tiger

    • B.

      Fowl

    • C.

      Ape

    • D.

      Cock-and-bull

    • E.

      Fishy

    • F.

      Ducky

    Correct Answer
    C. Ape
    Explanation
    go ape (over something): to become wildly excited or enthusiastic

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  • 2. 

    2. It was meant to be a cheerful visit to put the spotlight on successful teachers and charter schools — an event that more cynical observers tend to call a dog and ___ show. But when Arne Duncan, the federal education secretary, arrived in Brooklyn on Tuesday for a tour of some of its schools, he was stepping into a sensitive moment in New York education politics.[The New York Times. May 18, 2010]American English

    • A.

      Bone

    • B.

      Flea

    • C.

      Pony

    • D.

      Bear

    • E.

      Puppy

    • F.

      Cat

    Correct Answer
    C. Pony
    Explanation
    dog and pony show: an elaborated staged presentation aiming to persuade with little or no real information or content

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  • 3. 

    3. She had never found any place in the world intimidating when she was after a story and she had the ability to ___ out facts, an uncanny instinct for the truth.

    • A.

      Fox

    • B.

      Weasel

    • C.

      Monkey

    • D.

      Ferret

    • E.

      Grizzly

    • F.

      Hamster

    Correct Answer
    D. Ferret
    Explanation
    ferret out: to search and discover through persistent investigation

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  • 4. 

    4. To have a fellow going about the farm as cross with everybody as a ___ with a sore head, with a temper as sour as verjuice and as sharp as a razor, looking as surly as a butcher's dog, is a great nuisance; and yet there may be some good points about the man, so that he may be a man for all that.[Osgood Eaton Fuller, Brave Men and Women, 2008]British English

    • A.

      Mole

    • B.

      Bear

    • C.

      Dormouse

    • D.

      Hedgehog

    • E.

      Boar

    • F.

      Buzzard

    Correct Answer
    B. Bear
    Explanation
    if someone is like a bear with a sore head, they complain a lot and are unhappy about something

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  • 5. 

    5. Words that are used to qualify a statement so as to make it potentially misleading are known as "___ words". The expression first appeared in Stewart Chaplin's short story 'Stained Glass Political Platform' (published in 1900 in The Century Magazine), in which they were referred to as "words that suck the life out of the words next to them, just as a ___ sucks the egg and leaves the shell." [Wiktionary/Wikipedia]

    • A.

      Weasel

    • B.

      Snake

    • C.

      Fox

    • D.

      Raccoon

    • E.

      Rat

    • F.

      Hare

    Correct Answer
    A. Weasel
    Explanation
    Weasel words are words or phrases that are intentionally used to deceive or manipulate the reader or listener. They are used to qualify a statement in a way that makes it potentially misleading. The term "weasel words" was coined by Stewart Chaplin in his short story, where he compared these words to a weasel that sucks the life out of the words next to them. Therefore, the correct answer is "weasel."

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  • 6. 

    6. The phrase "the ___'s knees", meaning "the height of excellence", became popular in the U.S. in the 1920s, along with "the cat's whiskers" (possibly from the use of these in radio crystal sets), "the cat's pajamas" (pyjamas were still new enough to be daring), and similar phrases which made less sense and didn't endure...[The alt.usage.english FAQ]clipart from http://www.buncombecounty.org/news_Detail.asp?newsID=3811

    • A.

      Kitten

    • B.

      Giraffe

    • C.

      Flea

    • D.

      Manatee

    • E.

      Bee

    • F.

      Chimpanzee

    Correct Answer
    E. Bee
    Explanation
    In the 1920s, there was a trend of using phrases like "the cat's whiskers" and "the cat's pajamas" to describe something excellent or outstanding. During this time, the phrase "the bee's knees" also became popular and had a similar meaning. The use of "bee's knees" may have originated from the idea that bees collect pollen on their knees, which is considered a valuable and important task for them. This phrase, along with others from that era, became part of the American slang but did not endure in the long run.

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  • 7. 

    7. Avoiding the topic of racism is like draping a tablecloth over the ___ in the room . You can ignore it, but the ___ still exists.

    • A.

      Whale

    • B.

      Pig

    • C.

      Rhino

    • D.

      Bug

    • E.

      Mouse

    • F.

      Elephant

    Correct Answer
    F. Elephant
    Explanation
    elephant in the room: a problem that everyone knows very well but no one talks about because it is taboo, embarrassing, etc.

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  • 8. 

    8. In sales, the proverbial ___ ___ is that salesperson or company who totally dominates their market, taking more than their fair share of business, and winning time after time. How can you compete with that?

    • A.

      Winged horse

    • B.

      Fat cat

    • C.

      800-pound gorilla

    • D.

      Lion king

    • E.

      Malayan tiger

    • F.

      Killer whale

    Correct Answer
    C. 800-pound gorilla
    Explanation
    See http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/800+pound+gorilla.html

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  • 9. 

    9. Trains in those days did not have showers, and we had to make do with what my mother called a ___ ___, a very quick wash, in the fold-down washbasin in the compartment.Scottish English

    • A.

      Dust bunny

    • B.

      Barrel o' fish

    • C.

      Puppy bath

    • D.

      Otter's dive

    • E.

      Cat's lick

    • F.

      Frog jump

    Correct Answer
    E. Cat's lick
    Explanation
    See http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/cat%27s+lick.html

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  • 10. 

    10.   An Irish saying about a useless fellow: "He's fit to mind ___ at a crossroads."

    • A.

      Sheep

    • B.

      Dogs

    • C.

      Crickets

    • D.

      Pussies

    • E.

      Squirrels

    • F.

      Mice

    Correct Answer
    F. Mice
    Explanation
    See http://www.irishcelticjewels.com/jokes_teasing.htm

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  • 11. 

    11. Eighteen months ago Ben didn't talk a lot. Now he is extremely sociable: he can talk the hind leg off a ___!British English

    • A.

      Goat

    • B.

      Dromedary

    • C.

      Moose

    • D.

      Donkey

    • E.

      Newt

    • F.

      Turtle

    Correct Answer
    D. Donkey
    Explanation
    can talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey: to talk a lot

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  • 12. 

    12. Australians call "tomato sauce", or "___ ___" in Aussie slang, what Americans call "ketchup"or "catsup".

    • A.

      Red (kanga)roo

    • B.

      Dead horse

    • C.

      Laughing kookaburra

    • D.

      Dingo blood

    • E.

      Wombat barf

    • F.

      Root rat

    Correct Answer
    B. Dead horse
    Explanation
    See http://www.koalanet.com.au/australian-slang.html
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketchup
    http://aaronaaa.blogspot.com/2008/09/aussie-slang-pt-1-dead-horse.html

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 17, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Nov 25, 2010
    Quiz Created by
    Edevils
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