Somatoform And Dissociative Disorders

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 1069

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Disorder Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In dissociative fugue,
    • A. 

      Inability to recall previously stored information that cannot be accounted for by ordinary forgetting

    • B. 

      The person manifests at least two or more distinct identities that alternate in some way in taking control of behavior.

    • C. 

      Patterns of symptoms or deficits affecting sensory or voluntary motor functions, leading one to think there is a medical or neurological condition,

    • D. 

      Person not only goes into an amnesic state but also leaves his or her home surroundings and becomes confused about his or her identity, sometimes assuming a new one.

  • 2. 
    This 38-year-old married woman, the mother of five children, reports to a mental health clinic with the chief complaint of depression, meeting diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder. . . . Her marriage has been a chronically unhappy one; her husband is described as an alcoholic with an unstable work history, and there have been frequent arguments revolving around finances, her sexual indifference, and her complaints of pain during intercourse. The history reveals that the patient . . . describes herself as nervous since childhood and as having been continuously sickly beginning in her youth. She experiences chest pain and reportedly has been told by doctors that she has a “nervous heart.” She sees physicians frequently for abdominal pain, having been diagnosed on one occasion as having a “spastic colon.” In addition to M.D. physicians, she has consulted chiropractors and osteopaths for backaches, pains in her extremities, and a feeling of anesthesia in her fingertips. She was recently admitted to a hospital following complaints of abdominal and chest pain and of vomiting, during which admission she received a hysterectomy. Following the surgery she has been troubled by spells of anxiety, fainting, vomiting, food intolerance, and weakness and fatigue. Physical examinations reveal completely negative findings.
    • A. 

      Hypochondriasis

    • B. 

      Somatization disorder

    • C. 

      Conversion disorder

    • D. 

      DID

  • 3. 
    Somatization disorder (according to the DSM-IV-TR) requires __ gastrointestinal symptoms to present for diagnosis.
    • A. 

      Four

    • B. 

      Two

    • C. 

      One

    • D. 

      No

  • 4. 
    Pain disorder requires 2 or more pain sites for clinical diagnosis.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    The DSM mentions psychological factors in the diagnosis of pain disorder.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    Pain disorder is diagnosed more frequently in men than in women and is very frequently comorbid with anxiety and/or mood disorders, which may occur first or may arise later as a consequence of the pain disorder
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
    Typical examples include partial paralysis, blindness, deafness, and pseudoseizures
    • A. 

      Somatoform disorder

    • B. 

      Conversion disorder

    • C. 

      Pain disorder

    • D. 

      Major depressive disorder

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      Seeming lack of concern (known as la belle indifférence)

    • B. 

      Symptom or deficit cannot be fully explained by a general medical condition.

    • C. 

      One or more symptoms affecting voluntary motor or sensory function that suggest a neurological or other medical condition.

    • D. 

      Psychological factors judged to be associated with the symptoms because they were preceded by conflicts or other stressors.

  • 9. 
    Mrs. Chatterjee, a 26-year-old patient, attends a clinic in New Delhi, India, with complaints of “fits” for the last 4 years. The “fits” are always sudden in onset and usually last 30 to 60 minutes.A few minutes before a fit begins, she knows that it is imminent, and she usually goes to bed. During the fits she becomes unresponsive and rigid throughout her body, with bizarre and thrashing movements of the extremities. Her eyes close and her jaw is clenched, and she froths at the mouth. She frequently cries and sometimes shouts abuses. She is never incontinent of urine or feces, nor does she bite her tongue. After a “fit” she claims to have no memory of it. These episodes recur about once or twice a month. She functions well between the episodes. Both the patient and her family believe that her “fits” are evidence of a physical illness and are not under her control. However, they recognize that the fits often occur following some stressor such as arguments with family members or friends. . . . She is described by her family as being somewhat immature but “quite social” and good company. She is self-centered, she craves attention from others, and she often reacts with irritability and anger if her wishes are not immediately fulfilled. On physical examination, Mrs. Chatterjee was found to have mild anemia but was otherwise healthy. A mental status examination did not reveal any abnormality . . . and her memory was normal. An electroencephalogram showed no seizure activity. (Adapted from Spitzer et al., 2002, pp. 469–70.)
    • A. 

      Pain disorder

    • B. 

      Somatoform disorder

    • C. 

      Conversion disorder

    • D. 

      DID

  • 10. 
    Chris is a shy, anxious-looking, 31-year-old carpenter who has been hospitalized after making a suicide attempt. . . . He asks to meet with the psychiatrist in a darkened room. He is wearing a baseball cap pulled down over his forehead. Looking down at the floor, Chris says he has no friends, has just been fired from his job, and was recently rejected by his girlfriend. “It’s my nose . . . these huge pockmarks on my nose. They’re grotesque! I look like a monster. I’m as ugly as the Elephant Man! These marks on my nose are all that I can think about. I’ve thought about them every day for the past 15 years, and I think that everyone can see them and that they laugh at me because of them. That’s why I wear this hat all the time. And that’s why I couldn’t talk to you in a bright room . . . you’d see how ugly I am.” The psychiatrist couldn’t see the huge pockmarks that Chris was referring to, even in a brightly lit room. Chris is, in fact, a handsome man with normal-appearing facial pores. [Later Chris says,] “I’ve pretty much kept this preoccupation a secret because it’s so embarrassing. I’m afraid people will think I’m vain. But I’ve told a few people about it, and they’ve tried to convince me that the pores really aren’t visible. . . . This problem has ruined my life. All I can think about is my face. I spend hours a day looking at the marks in the mirror. . . . I started missing more and more work, and I stopped going out with my friends and my girlfriend . . . staying in the house most of the time. . . .” Chris . . . had seen a dermatologist to request dermabrasion, but was refused the procedure because “there was nothing there.” He finally convinced another dermatologist to do the procedure but thought it did not help. Eventually he felt so desperate that he made two suicide attempts. His most recent attempt occurred after he looked in the mirror and was horrified by what he saw . . . “I saw how awful I looked, and I thought, I’m not sure it’s worth it to go on living if I have to look like this and think about this all the time.”
    • A. 

      Ficticious disorder

    • B. 

      Conversion disorder

    • C. 

      OCD

    • D. 

      BDD