Skills - February 9 - 13, 2009

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Skills - February 9 - 13, 2009

Students will read and analyze grade appropriate, 8th grade text, in order to answer questions.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Magic Nurse When she touched the burning forehead,the fever seepedinto her fingers.When she moved her lips to form a prayer,or closed her eyes to make a wish,or crossed her fingerto a form a twist—the fever turned into a teardrop.the teardrop into a pearl.When she blew a kiss,butterflies hovered overthe wet pillow, and the sad blanket.She healed.Kubla KhanKubla Khan was the founder and first emperor of the Mongol Yuan dynasty in China. He completed the conquest of China that was begun by his grandfather. In 1264, he founded and built his capital on the site that is now Beijing. The capital was called Khanbalik, and it was a wonder to behold.Kubla Khan was famous throughout all Asia and Europe. Many famous and powerful people came to call on him at Khanbalik, including the famous traveler, Marco Polo. During his reign, Kubla Khan did his best to advance literature and the arts in his empire. How does the poem differ from the nonfiction passage?
    • A. 

      It is magical, almost make-believe in tone.

    • B. 

      It does not mention arts and literature.

    • C. 

      It does not mention any building projects.

    • D. 

      It is about a nature and not about a ruler.

  • 2. 
    Passage 1   Baby Magic’s Sleepy Molly doll cries and coos just like a real baby! This collectible baby doll is beautifully handcrafted, with lifelike vinyl skin, delicate eyelashes, and gorgeous blue eyes that open and close. She is the perfect baby doll for “little mommies” everywhere. Sleepy Molly comes dressed in a soft cotton nightgown and nightcap and is 12” tall. Welcome her home today!Passage 2 Doll TroubleWe took the talking dollout of its caseto locate the sourceof its whimpersthat gushed from its face.You see, there was no buttonand no switch.It cried if anyone evertouched its feet.The wiry hair stood up,as if shocked in the making.Its gigantic eyes blinked without feeling.And its plastic mouthyawned an infant yawn.Its dress was algae-greenwith doll-size pocketsto store doll-size things.But the source of screamswas nowhere to be seen.Perhaps the doll was hauntedin its dreams.   Based on the text, the reader can tell that the doll in passage 1 and the doll in passage 2
    • A. 

      Both have wiry brown hair.

    • B. 

      Both have eyes that blink.

    • C. 

      Both wear cotton dresses.

    • D. 

      Both are able to yawn.

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      School bells and reading can help students learn.

    • B. 

      Reading opens up a whole world of possibility.

    • C. 

      Everybody deserves a second chance in life.

    • D. 

      Things are sometimes better than they first seem.

  • 4. 
    Passage 1 BooksNew or old, borrowed or bought, Books smell of a new adventure. Flying, sailing, and even sword fighting, Each page opens a new possibility. But though I love to read and write, Required reading is no fun at first sight. Often times the books are boring, Not captivating like the stories I choose. Yet once or twice I’ve been surprised, I’ve found that some books are worth trying. So reading, required or not, I shall do until I can no longer see.Passage 2 That School BellEvery morning, when the alarm sounds,We children pile into the brown brick building,To learn and play, to gossip and doodle,But we would all rather not have to go.The minute we hear the bell,Our smiles flip into frowns,We grumble and pout,Wishing for the end of the day.Each afternoon, when that school bell rings,We kids are shuffled out of the school house,To go home, to do homework,But we would all rather stay for awhile.The minute we hear that ring,Our laughter and giggles become silent,We say goodbye and grab our bags,Looking forward to the next school day.What do the two passages have in common?
    • A. 

      Both passages are most likely from an adventure book.

    • B. 

      Both passages take place at a school in the afternoon.

    • C. 

      Both passages are told in first-person point of view.

    • D. 

      Both passages talk about the benefits of reading books.

  • 5. 
    1) Jackie RobinsonJackie Robinson began his professional baseball career in 1945 with the Kansas City Monarchs, one of the leading teams of the then-separate Negro Leagues. Later that year, Robinson was recruited and signed by Branch Rickey, the general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers (now the Los Angeles Dodgers). Robinson was called up from the minor leagues to the Brooklyn team in 1946, becoming the first black player to compete in the major leagues in the 20th century.Breaking baseball’s color barrier was a serious challenge, and Robinson met fierce resistance from many players and fans. Robinson endured malicious catcalls and racial slurs shouted from the stands and even anonymous death threats. Some rival players threw pitches at Robinson’s head, spat on him when he slid into a base, and attempted to injure him with the spikes on their shoes. However, the determined Robinson survived these attacks and helped the Dodgers win the National League (NL) pennant in 1947. During the season, Robinson led the NL with 29 stolen bases and was named rookie of the year in the major leagues.2) Wilma RudolphWilma Rudolph was one of America’s first great track and field athletes. Born in Tennessee, Rudolph had far from a normal childhood. At the age of four she came down with pneumonia, polio, and scarlet fever. The illnesses so ravaged her body that Rudolph could not even walk normally until she turned eleven years old.In high school, Rudolph was an outstanding basketball player. But track was the sport in which she really shone. In 1956 she ran at the Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, and won a bronze medal in the 4X100-meter relay. At the 1960 Olympics, she won the 100-meter and 200-meter dashes and again ran on the 4X100-meter relay team.In 1961 Rudolph won the James E. Sullivan Memorial Award, an award that goes each year to the outstanding amateur athlete in the US. Later that year Rudolph retired from competition.   What similarities existed in the career of these two athletes?
    • A. 

      Both participated in the Olympics.

    • B. 

      Both overcame huge obstacles to excel in their sports.

    • C. 

      Both suffered childhood illnesses that threatened their careers.

    • D. 

      Both were outstanding amateur athletes.

  • 6. 
    Beautiful Runner He ran, as if a man can neverwalk or stop to breathe.He turned the dirt into dust,and the water into waves.He ran like no other man.A breathing bronze sculpture,he ran for fame and gold.They say he moved like a deer.He ran like water that flowsfrom mountains to the river.He moved in beauty, he moved.Goodbye, EmmittSome would argue that it’s time to tell Emmitt Smith goodbye. The Dallas Cowboys running back holds the record for the most rushing yards ever by a professional football player, but very few of those yards have been gained this season. In fact, one wonders why Emmitt is still on the field as often as he is. He is considerably slower than he was when he gained most of his many thousands of yards. He is no longer an important cog in the offensive wheel—a wheel with a flat tire and many busted spokes.Oh, for the glory days, “Emmitt up the middle!” “Emmitt down the sideline!” But we seldom hear those calls from amazed announcers anymore. Now Emmitt’s name is most often mentioned in the context of “When will Emmitt retire?”What similarities can you find in these two passages?
    • A. 

      Both refer to loyal fans of star athletes.

    • B. 

      Both are about well-known gold medalists.

    • C. 

      Both reflect on the career of star athletes.

    • D. 

      Both are about the beauty of athleticism.

  • 7. 
    Beautiful Runner He ran, as if a man can neverwalk or stop to breathe.He turned the dirt into dust,and the water into waves.He ran like no other man.A breathing bronze sculpture,he ran for fame and gold.They say he moved like a deer.He ran like water that flowsfrom mountains to the river.He moved in beauty, he moved.Goodbye, EmmittSome would argue that it’s time to tell Emmitt Smith goodbye. The Dallas Cowboys running back holds the record for the most rushing yards ever by a professional football player, but very few of those yards have been gained this season. In fact, one wonders why Emmitt is still on the field as often as he is. He is considerably slower than he was when he gained most of his many thousands of yards. He is no longer an important cog in the offensive wheel—a wheel with a flat tire and many busted spokes.Oh, for the glory days, “Emmitt up the middle!” “Emmitt down the sideline!” But we seldom hear those calls from amazed announcers anymore. Now Emmitt’s name is most often mentioned in the context of “When will Emmitt retire?”How are these two athletes different?
    • A. 

      One achieved fame for his athleticism, the other did not.

    • B. 

      One had the support of loyal fans, the other never did.

    • C. 

      One experienced great success in his sport, the other did not.

    • D. 

      One exhibited magical beauty in sports, the other did not.

  • 8. 
    Mohandas GandhiMohandas Gandhi was educated in the United Kingdom and earned a law degree from University College in London. He was greatly troubled by the way the British government ruled the people of India, and he dedicated much of his life to helping achieve India’s independence. Gandhi taught methods of passive resistance, such as hunger strikes, to those who struggled with him. He never favored violence. In fact, he admitted to learning many of the principles he followed from the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, from Christ, and from the American writer Henry David Thoreau.Cesar ChavezCesar Chavez was the son of migrant farm workers. Born in Arizona, he was forced to leave school after the sixth grade and begin working on farms himself. He served in the US navy during World War II, then came back to the US and began working to create a farm workers union. He was disgusted by the low wages paid to migrant workers, by their harsh working conditions, and by the lack of medical care and insurance provided to them. Chavez led a great war on the farm owners, but he did it without weapons or violence. He used such methods as hunger strikes and boycotts to further his message. In 1977, the United Farm Workers became an official union.What differences were there in the lives of Gandhi and Chavez?
    • A. 

      Gandhi received an advanced education and Chavez did not.

    • B. 

      Gandhi spent his life in pursuit of human rights and Chavez did not.

    • C. 

      Gandhi led a large group of people in revolt and Chavez did not.

    • D. 

      Gandhi believed that all people should have the right to govern themselves and Chavez did not.

  • 9. 
    Mohandas GandhiMohandas Gandhi was educated in the United Kingdom and earned a law degree from University College in London. He was greatly troubled by the way the British government ruled the people of India, and he dedicated much of his life to helping achieve India’s independence. Gandhi taught methods of passive resistance, such as hunger strikes, to those who struggled with him. He never favored violence. In fact, he admitted to learning many of the principles he followed from the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, from Christ, and from the American writer Henry David Thoreau.Cesar ChavezCesar Chavez was the son of migrant farm workers. Born in Arizona, he was forced to leave school after the sixth grade and begin working on farms himself. He served in the US navy during World War II, then came back to the US and began working to create a farm workers union. He was disgusted by the low wages paid to migrant workers, by their harsh working conditions, and by the lack of medical care and insurance provided to them. Chavez led a great war on the farm owners, but he did it without weapons or violence. He used such methods as hunger strikes and boycotts to further his message. In 1977, the United Farm Workers became an official union.How were the public careers of Gandhi and Chavez similar?
    • A. 

      Both helped a country achieve independence from another country.

    • B. 

      Both gave credit for their ideas to the writers Tolstoy and Thoreau.

    • C. 

      Both worked primarily in the U.S.

    • D. 

      Both used nonviolent methods to achieve their goals.

  • 10. 
    The rise of rock and roll in the mid-1950s gave rise to a stream of local dance shows. They popped up all over the country. Aside from Baltimore’s The Buddy Dean Show, there were such favorites as The Lloyd Thaxton Show in Los Angeles, The Big 5 Show in Cleveland, and Top 10 Dance Party in Memphis. These shows featured real live kids doing the same dances they would do at their high school dances.TV programmers knew rock and roll was a revolution that needed to be broadcast. “They were shrewd enough to recognize that these shows were places where kids could hang out on TV,” says filmmaker Ron Mann, whose 1992 documentary, “Twist,” about the history of rock and roll dances, was recently released on DVD. “They were the MTV of their day.”Several shows became so popular that they went national—which cost them their soul, in Mann’s view. When American Bandstand left Philadelphia, it lost a lot, he says. “Then you had NBC’s Hullabaloo and ABC’s Shindig, which didn’t have teens dancing. They had professional dancers. It was all choreographed for TV. And that spelled the end of the rock and roll dance era.” --Frank DeCaroHow did the TV shows, The Lloyd Thaxton Show and The Big 5 Show differ from Shindig?
    • A. 

      The Lloyd Thaxton Show and The Big 5 Show were live television shows, but Shindig was tape recorded.

    • B. 

      The Lloyd Thaxton Show and The Big 5 Show had real teenagers dancing, but Shindig used professional dancers.

    • C. 

      The Lloyd Thaxton Show and The Big 5 Show were weekly shows, but Shindig was a one-time special.

    • D. 

      The Lloyd Thaxton Show and The Big 5 Show featured rock and roll music, but Shindig featured Big Band music.

  • 11. 
    Here, I want to try to give you an answer to the question: What personal qualities are desirable in a teacher? Probably no two people would draw up exactly similar lists, but I think the following would be generally accepted.Based upon this first paragraph, what is the rest of the paper most likely about?
    • A. 

      How to become a good teacher

    • B. 

      How teachers enjoy their jobs

    • C. 

      How teachers write tests

    • D. 

      How teachers are mean

  • 12. 
    In Asa’s eyes, Rodney Reeves was a dreamboat. She had admired him from afar since the 6th grade. He seemed so nice to everyone and had the cutest smile. Although Asa wasn’t quite sure what “going steady” meant, she knew that she wanted to go steady with Rodney. One day, she got the courage to write him a note to profess how much she liked him and how cute she thought he was. Asa gave her note to her friend Stacy for delivery because Stacy had science class with Rodney.     During lunch, Asa rushed into the lunchroom with high hopes and asked Stacy if Rodney had read her note. Stacy responded, “Yeah, he read it alright! The jerk read it aloud to his friends, had a good laugh, and then ripped it up. Don’t waste your time with him.”     Shocked and heartbroken, Asa realized that her two-year crush had ended in disaster. “I didn’t think that he could be so cruel. I can't believe that anyone could be so cruel.”   If Asa were to write Rodney another note and slip it into his locker, he would most likely be
    • A. 

      Appreciative.

    • B. 

      Sickened.

    • C. 

      Amused.

    • D. 

      Flattered.

  • 13. 
    A report by the International Labor Organization reveals that Americans are working more. The average American man works 100 more hours a year now than in the 1970s. The average American woman works 200 more hours a year. What has caused this increase in hours? One theory blames an economy that emphasizes consumption. Many advertisements, television shows, and movies promote luxurious lifestyles. People feel that they must work more to fund their ever-growing wants; they want to buy the goods society is telling them they must have.   Which of the following examples will the author most likely include in the passage?
    • A. 

      Paulina graduated from college and became a successful accountant soon after; however, she felt that the long hours were tedious and unnecessary, so she became an office manager instead.

    • B. 

      In 2002, Lucy quit her job as an attorney to take care of her two children full time; she felt that playing an active role in her children's growth was more important than her career.

    • C. 

      In 2001, Mark saved his money and bought a $400 iPod that could hold 1,000 songs; he soon grew tired of his iPod, however, in 2002, when an iPod that could hold 5,000 songs debuted.

    • D. 

      Jonathan donates $100 a month to an organization that helps families in need; he also enjoys volunteering once a week at a local homeless shelter, where he serves food and talks to the homeless.

  • 14. 
      Elevenby Sandra Cisneros     You don't feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you don't feel smart eleven, not until you're almost twelve. That's the way it is. Only today I wish I didn't have only eleven years rattling inside me like pennies in a tin Band-Aid box. Today I wish I was one hundred and two instead of eleven because if I was one hundred and two I'd have known what to say when Mrs. Price put the red sweater on my desk. I would've known how to tell her it wasn't mine instead of just sitting there with that look on my face and nothing coming out of my mouth.     "Whose is this?" Mrs. Price says, and she holds the red sweater up in the air for all the class to see. "Whose? It's been sitting in the coatroom for a month."     "Not mine," says everybody. "Not mine."     "It has to belong to somebody," Mrs. Price keeps saying, but nobody can remember. It's an ugly sweater with red plastic buttons and a collar and sleeves all stretched out like you could use it for a jump rope. It's maybe a thousand years old and even if it belonged to me I wouldn't say so.adapted from "Eleven," by Sandra Cisneros What happens after Mrs. Price puts the sweater on the girl’s desk?
    • A. 

      The girl throws a fit because she's scared.

    • B. 

      The girl decided to put the sweater on.

    • C. 

      The girl tells her the sweater isn't hers.

    • D. 

      The girl is speechless.

  • 15. 
      Elevenby Sandra Cisneros     You don't feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you don't feel smart eleven, not until you're almost twelve. That's the way it is. Only today I wish I didn't have only eleven years rattling inside me like pennies in a tin Band-Aid box. Today I wish I was one hundred and two instead of eleven because if I was one hundred and two I'd have known what to say when Mrs. Price put the red sweater on my desk. I would've known how to tell her it wasn't mine instead of just sitting there with that look on my face and nothing coming out of my mouth.     "Whose is this?" Mrs. Price says, and she holds the red sweater up in the air for all the class to see. "Whose? It's been sitting in the coatroom for a month."     "Not mine," says everybody. "Not mine."     "It has to belong to somebody," Mrs. Price keeps saying, but nobody can remember. It's an ugly sweater with red plastic buttons and a collar and sleeves all stretched out like you could use it for a jump rope. It's maybe a thousand years old and even if it belonged to me I wouldn't say so.adapted from "Eleven," by Sandra Cisneros How long is it before you start to feel eleven?
    • A. 

      It takes four days.

    • B. 

      It takes a while.

    • C. 

      You never feel eleven.

    • D. 

      It happens right away.

  • 16. 
    S.E. Hinton began writing her controversial first book, The Outsiders, when she was only 15-years-old. The Outsiders was published when Hinton was 18. The book is one of the most popular novels ever published for young adults. There are more than eight million copies in print. The coming-of-age tale about Ponyboy Curtis and his friends, the "Greasers," (a group of lower income boys who use grease to slick their hair back) was also made into a film.     A major issue in The Outsiders is the struggle between the Greasers and the Socs, (the middle to upper income boys). Friendship, honor, and brotherly love between Pony and his older brothers Sodapop and Darry are also recurring themes.What is the best way to summarize this passage?
    • A. 

      There are more than eight million copies of The Outsiders in print. S.E. Hinton was only 18 when the book was published.

    • B. 

      S.E. Hinton's first book, The Outsiders, is one of the best selling young adult novels ever. The coming of age tale about friendship, class struggles, and honor has been printed over eight million times.

    • C. 

      The bestselling novel, The Outsiders, was made into a film. S.E. Hinton was 15-years-old when she wrote it. Sodapop, Ponyboy, and Darry are brothers in the book. They slick their hair back with grease.

    • D. 

      Ponyboy has two brothers named Darry and Sodapop. He and his friends put grease in their hair to make the Socs mad.

  • 17. 
    On Monday, Mike Lummus withdrew from this city's race for mayor. Lummus is a retired police officer. He made this decision after he found out that opponent Gary Nelon shares his goals. Lummus and Nelon want to heal the city's political wounds. They also want to encourage citizens to be more active in government. Nelon is chairman of First Ohio Bancorp.Which of these provides the best summary of the paragraph?
    • A. 

      Mike Lummus and Gary Nelon want to heal the city's political wounds. Lummus is a retired police officer, and Nelon is a chairman of First Ohio Bancorp.

    • B. 

      Mike Lummus will have to find another way to keep himself busy now that he is not running for mayor. Mike Lummus is a retired police officer.

    • C. 

      Mike Lummus decided not to run for mayor. He withdrew after finding out that his opponent, Gary Nelon, shares his same goals for the city.

    • D. 

      Mike Lummus retired from the police department so that he could run for city mayor. Then, he decided not to run for mayor after all.