Aapg Quiz: Sequence Stratigraphy, Part 1 (Of 5)

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Aapg Quiz: Sequence Stratigraphy, Part 1 (Of 5)

Sequence stratigraphy is important to all subsurface geologists, and a thorough understanding of the principles can help you with a wide variety of plays, ranging from deep marine clastics, to fine-grained clastics (shale plays). Don't miss the AAPG Haynesville Playmaker Forum, April 26 in Houston, TX AAPG and its sister organization, SEPM, offer a wide array of informational and instructional materials to help you learn what sequence stratigraphy is, and to apply it in ways that will help you. Test your knowledge of sequence stratigraphy by taking the quick ten-question quiz. Be sure to fill in your full name -- you'll be able to print out a certificate of completion, which includes your score on the quiz. If you need


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Stratigraphy is the science of
    • A. 

      Time and movement.

    • B. 

      The past is key to the present.

    • C. 

      The present is key to the past.

    • D. 

      Layered character of rocks.

  • 2. 
    Sequence stratigraphy focuses on
    • A. 

      Paleoecological frameworks characterized by unique fossil assemblage

    • B. 

      The order in which the strata accumulated combined with depositional and erosional surface frameworks to interpret depositional settings

    • C. 

      Basin modeling and sea level

    • D. 

      Astroblemes and other allochthonous events that can have local and regional implications, resulting in unique traps

  • 3. 
    Bounding surfaces
    • A. 

      Are subdividing surfaces of the sedimentary section and are commonly generated by the changing relative sea level.

    • B. 

      Surfaces that never tie to rebounds due to isostacy and eustacy.

    • C. 

      Are boundaries that never have to do shales and TOC, and cannot be considered key indicators of the kitchen.

    • D. 

      Are blurring surfaces that have to do with fracture patterns.

  • 4. 
    Sequence stratigraphy involves a geologic model that makes the following assumptions:
    • A. 

      Sea level position varied

    • B. 

      Subsidence was constant

    • C. 

      Sediment supply was constant

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 5. 
    Walther's Law
    • A. 

      Involves paleobotany and involves the depth and temperatures of sea water.

    • B. 

      Establishes the geochemical signature of different formations.

    • C. 

      Proposes that the vertical progression of facies should be the same as corresponding lateral facies changes.

    • D. 

      Differentiates between clay minerals and carbonates.

  • 6. 
    Sequence stratigraphy involves combining the following:
    • A. 

      All of the below.

    • B. 

      Stratal architecture and the chronological order of the indicated facies along with grain size information and lithology.

    • C. 

      The provenance of the different grains, combined with structural systems.

    • D. 

      Diagenetic alteration and lamina.

  • 7. 
    A depositional sequence is
    • A. 

      One that never uses water saturation in marker beds as sequence boundaries.

    • B. 

      The term used to indicate that hydrothermal alteration has occurred at certain intervals in time.

    • C. 

      A stratigraphic unit composed of a relatively conformable succession of genetically related strata and bounded at its top and base by unconformites or their correlative conformity.

    • D. 

      Never used in deep marine clastics such as turbidites.

  • 8. 
    The sequence stratigraphy method of stratigraphic interpretation
    • A. 

      Supports the idea that convection currents and subduction zones are the key to understanding depositional models.

    • B. 

      Combines the stratal architecture (geometric relationship) of the sedimentary facies and the chronological order of their accumulation to enhance the interpretation of depositional setting and prediction of stratal continuity.

    • C. 

      Involves microseismic, and nothing more.

    • D. 

      Allows the geologist to rule out salt tectonics.

  • 9. 
    Lithostratigraphic analysis
    • A. 

      Maps lithofacies independent of subdividing external and internal boundaries.

    • B. 

      Forces one to include Young's modulus values.

    • C. 

      Always puts into question all geomechanical calculations, including pore pressure.

    • D. 

      Establishes hiearchies of relevance, exclusing igneous intrusions.

  • 10. 
    Stacking patterns include
    • A. 

      Parasequence

    • B. 

      Progradation

    • C. 

      Retrogradation

    • D. 

      Transgression

    • E. 

      All of the above