Do Your Best To Answer These Questions From Act III Of Romeo And Juliet.

By Tina Marie
Tina Marie, Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.
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Do Your Best To Answer These Questions From Act III Of Romeo And Juliet. - Quiz

All of the information is in the order that it appears in the play. This is an excellent way to prepare for your quiz, but remember to look over your annotations, the questions, and other literary terms, too.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What literary device is apparent here? TYBALT Mercutio, thou consort'st with Romeo,-- MERCUTIO Consort! what, dost thou make us minstrels? an thou make minstrels of us, look to hear nothing but discords: here's my fiddlestick; here's that shall make you dance.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Metaphor

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Foreshadowing

    • E.

      Oxymoron

    Correct Answer
    C. Pun
    Explanation
    Tybalt uses "consort," meaning associate; Mercutio replies using "consort" referring to a company of musicians.

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  • 2. 

    Who speaks these lines? Tybalt, the reason that I have to love thee Doth much excuse the appertaining rage To such a greeting. Villain am I none. Therefore farewell. I see thou knowest me not.

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    He does not want to fight Tybalt because he is now married to Juliet (which is the reason he loves him).

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  • 3. 

    Who speaks these lines? I am hurt. A plague a both houses! I am sped.

    Correct Answer
    Mercutio
    Explanation
    He blames both families (and their feud) for his death.

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  • 4. 

    Who speaks these lines? No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.

    Correct Answer
    Mercutio
    Explanation
    Romeo and his friends think Mercutio is joking around (because he is always joking around), but Mercutio is trying to let them know that he is really dying as a result of the wound.

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  • 5. 

    What literary device is apparent in these lines? No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Metaphor

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Foreshadowing

    • E.

      Oxymoron

    Correct Answer
    C. Pun
    Explanation
    Tomorrow they will realize he was grave (serious) and that he is in a grave (he's dead).

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  • 6. 

    Who speaks these lines? Thy beauty hath made me effeminate And in my temper soften'd valour's steel!

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    Romeo says that Juliet's love has made him weak and "effeminate," but has he really changed all that much?

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  • 7. 

    Who speaks these lines? O, I am fortune's fool!

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    He blames fate ("fortune") for what has happened.

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  • 8. 

    Who speaks these lines? He is a kinsman to the Montague; Affection makes him false; he speaks not true: Some twenty of them fought in this black strife, And all those twenty could but kill one life. I beg for justice, which thou, prince, must give; Romeo slew Tybalt, Romeo must not live.

    Correct Answer
    Lady Capulet
    Explanation
    She feels her nephew, who is a master swordsman, had to be killed by more than just one man. She also assumes that Benvolio is lying to protect the Montagues. Lastly, she reminds the Prince of his edict: The penalty for fighting is death, so Romeo must die.

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  • 9. 

    Who speaks these lines? Not Romeo, prince, he was Mercutio's friend; His fault concludes but what the law should end, The life of Tybalt.

    Correct Answer
    Montague
    Explanation
    He makes a plea on his son's behalf: Tybalt would have died anyway (for killing Mercutio), so Romeo should not be put to death.

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  • 10. 

    Who speaks these lines? So tedious is this day As is the night before some festival To an impatient child that hath new robes And may not wear them.

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    Unware of the fatal fight, she is anxiously awaiting Romeo's arrival on their wedding night.

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  • 11. 

    What literary device is apparent in these lines? So tedious is this day As is the night before some festival To an impatient child that hath new robes And may not wear them.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Metaphor

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Foreshadowing

    • E.

      Oxymoron

    Correct Answer
    A. Simile
    Explanation
    She is saying that the day is "as" the night before a party to an "impatient child" who wants to wear his/her new party clothes.

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  • 12. 

    What literary device is apparent in these lines? JULIET O serpent heart, hid with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave? Beautiful tyrant! fiend angelical! Dove-feather'd raven! wolvish-ravening lamb! Despised substance of divinest show! Just opposite to what thou justly seem'st, A damned saint, an honourable villain! O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell, When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend In moral paradise of such sweet flesh? Was ever book containing such vile matter So fairly bound? O that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous palace!

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Metaphor

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Foreshadowing

    • E.

      Oxymoron

    Correct Answer
    E. Oxymoron
    Explanation
    She lists a number of opposite (i.e. "damned saint" "honorable villian") to convey how she feels now knowing that her husband, whom she loves, has killed her cousin, which she obviously is not happy about.

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  • 13. 

    Who speaks these lines? There is no world without Verona walls, But purgatory, torture, hell itself. Hence banished is banished from the world, And world's exile is death.

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    He is upset because he is exiled and cannot be with Juliet. As usual, he is overreacting a bit.

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  • 14. 

    Who speaks these lines? O, tell me, friar, tell me, In what vile part of this anatomy Doth my name lodge? Tell me, that I may sack The hateful mansion.

    Correct Answer
    Romeo
    Explanation
    He threatens to kill himself because his banishment.

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  • 15. 

    Who speaks these lines? Thy tears are womanish; thy wild acts denote The unreasonable fury of a beast: Unseemly woman in a seeming man!

    Correct Answer
    Friar Lawrence
    Explanation
    He reminds Romeo that he needs to pull himself together and act like a man.

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  • 16. 

    Who speaks these lines? Go get thee to thy love, as was decreed, Ascend her chamber, hence and comfort her. But look thou stay not till the watch be set, For then thou canst not pass to Mantua.

    Correct Answer
    Friar Lawrence
    Explanation
    He is telling Romeo what to do: Go see Juliet tonight, but leave early (so you don't get caught) for Mantua.

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  • 17. 

    Who speaks these lines? Wilt thou be gone? It is not yet near day. It was a nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear. Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree. Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    She is trying to enjoy their last minutes together. She says they hear the nightingale (a bird of the night) rather than the lark (a bird heard in the morning).

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  • 18. 

    What literary device is apparent here? JULIET O God, I have an ill-divining soul! Methinks I see thee, now thou art below, As one dead in the bottom of a tomb: Either my eyesight fails, or thou look'st pale.

    • A.

      Simile

    • B.

      Metaphor

    • C.

      Pun

    • D.

      Foreshadowing

    • E.

      Oxymoron

    Correct Answer
    D. Foreshadowing
    Explanation
    The next time she sees Romeo he WILL be dead.

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  • 19. 

    Who speaks these lines? Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what--get thee to church a Thursday Or never after look me in the face.

    Correct Answer
    Capulet
    Explanation
    He is angry because Juliet has refused to marry Paris. She must marry him or he will disown her.

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  • 20. 

    Who speaks these lines? Go in; and tell my lady I am gone, Having displeased my father, to Lawrence' cell, To make confession and to be absolved.

    Correct Answer
    Juliet
    Explanation
    Juliet, who no longer trusts the nurse, tells her that she is going to the Friar to confess that she's "displeased [her} father." The audience knows, however, that she is going to him for help avoiding marrying Paris.

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Tina Marie |Langauge, Arts
Tina is a Language Arts and AP Seminar teacher at Mainland Regional High School in NJ, dedicated to guiding students through their academic journey.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 22, 2022
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Feb 04, 2008
    Quiz Created by
    Tina Marie
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