Quiz On Dysarthria And Dyspraxia For Dss Exam

35 Questions | Total Attempts: 111

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Quiz On Dysarthria And Dyspraxia For Dss Exam

Dysarthria is a condition wherein the muscles used for speech are weakened and difficult to control. Dyspraxia is a chronic neurological condition that affects the planning of movements and co-ordination. What can you tell us about them?


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    List what domains you assess when assessing dysarthria and dyspraxia.
  • 2. 
    Which dysarthria is characterised by atrophy and fasciculations?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hyperkinetic

    • D. 

      Hypokinetic

    • E. 

      Spastic

  • 3. 
    Which dysarthria is characterised by emotional lability?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hyperkinetic

    • D. 

      Hypokinetic

    • E. 

      Spastic

  • 4. 
    Which dysarthria is characterised by factors including nystagmus, hypotonia, intention tremor and dysmetria?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hyperkinetic

    • D. 

      Spastic

    • E. 

      Unilateral Upper Motor Neuron

  • 5. 
    Which dysarthria is characterised by festination?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hypokinetic

    • D. 

      Hyperkinetic

    • E. 

      Spastic

  • 6. 
    Which dysarthria is characterised by chorea, dystonia, and tics?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hyperkinetic

    • D. 

      Hypokinetic

    • E. 

      Unilateral UMN

  • 7. 
    Which dysarthria is characterised by unliateral palatal weakness?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hypokinetic

    • D. 

      Spastic

    • E. 

      Unilateral UMN

  • 8. 
    A patient is presenting with irregular artic breakdowns, harsh voice, explosive loudness patterns and scanning speech. Which dysarthria holds the most likely diagnosis?
    • A. 

      Ataxic

    • B. 

      Flaccid

    • C. 

      Hyperkinetic

    • D. 

      Spastic

    • E. 

      Unilateral UMN

  • 9. 
    Which of the following is not a symptom of flaccid dysarthria?
    • A. 

      Atrophy and fasciculations

    • B. 

      Audible nasal emissions and nasal regurgitation

    • C. 

      Variable prosodic rate

    • D. 

      Breathiness and diplophonia

    • E. 

      Slowed AMR's

  • 10. 
    Which of the following is not a symptom of spastic dysarthria?
    • A. 

      Emotional lability

    • B. 

      Hyperactive gag reflex

    • C. 

      Low pitch, with strained strangled voice quality

    • D. 

      Festination

    • E. 

      Excess and equal stress

  • 11. 
    Which statement regarding ataxic dysarthria is incorrect?
    • A. 

      Damage to the cerebellum and cerbellar system, and is usually bilateral

    • B. 

      Rhythm is disturbed, but not articulation

    • C. 

      Tone changes occur

    • D. 

      Can be caused by Multiple Sclerosis, multiple systems atrophy and Shy-Drager syndrome

    • E. 

      Includes major prosodic changes, including scanning, stumbling, prolonged phonemes, and a generally distrubed rhythm.

  • 12. 
    Which statement regarding hypokinetic dysarthria is incorrect?
    • A. 

      Characterised by reduced movements, festination, rigidity and Parkinsonism symptoms.

    • B. 

      Occurs from damage to subcortical regions, particularly the basal ganglia

    • C. 

      Prosody characterised by reduced stress, loudness, with inappropriate silences

    • D. 

      Characterised by "blurred" speech, excess loudness variations, and reduced force

    • E. 

      Articulation characterised by palilalia, reduced jaw stability and festination

  • 13. 
    Which statement regarding hyperkinetic dysarthria is incorrect?
    • A. 

      Includes oro-facial tardive dyskinesia, chorea and dystonia

    • B. 

      Results from damage to the cerebellar unit or pyramidal pathway

    • C. 

      Respiration characterised by sudden, forced involuntary inspiration or expiration

    • D. 

      Has irregular artic breakdowns, a variable rate, distorted vowels, slow irregular AMR's

    • E. 

      Phonation characteristics include pitch & loudness breaks, abnormal noises and a harsh vocal quality.

  • 14. 
    Which statement regarding unilateral upper motor neuron dysarthria is incorrect?
    • A. 

      Results from damage to upper motor neuron pathways

    • B. 

      Possible unilateral tongue or lower face weakness with atrophy and fasciculations

    • C. 

      Imprecise AMR's and irregular artic breakdowns

    • D. 

      Includes mild dysphagia and drooling

    • E. 

      Damage occurs through vascular events, TBI's and tumours

  • 15. 
    Why do you assess dysarthria and dyspraxia? (5 reasons)
  • 16. 
    Which of the following statements regarding paediatric assessment is incorrect?
    • A. 

      The Robbins-Klee Protocol is for assessing respiratory support

    • B. 

      VMPAC stands for Verbal Motor Production Assessment for Children

    • C. 

      The Great Ormond Street Speech Assessment (GOS.SP.ASS) is for assessing childhood apraxia of speech

    • D. 

      The Goldmann Fristoe test of articulation can be used for assessment of dysarthria and dyspraxia

    • E. 

      The OME/OPE plus a speech sample can be used

  • 17. 
    Which of the following statements is correct regarding assessment of adult dysarthria and dyspraxia?
    • A. 

      Assessment tools include: OME, assessing oral mechanism at rest, Frenchay, Apraxia battery for adults

    • B. 

      Assessment does not assess intelligibility or comprehesibility.

    • C. 

      A case history is necessary

    • D. 

      Salient features and confirmatory signs need to be identified

    • E. 

      A speech sample may be taken

  • 18. 
    The nature of paediatric breakdowns include: (more than 1 correct answer):
    • A. 

      Artic: place, manner, range of movement

    • B. 

      Timing of speech sound production and co-ordination

    • C. 

      Sequencing and accuracy disorders

    • D. 

      Prosody disorders

    • E. 

      Resonatory disorders

  • 19. 
    What are the parameters for speech production as listed by Joffee
    • A. 

      Range

    • B. 

      Strength

    • C. 

      Co-ordination

    • D. 

      Speed

    • E. 

      Muscle tension

  • 20. 
    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAoS) is not characterised by
    • A. 

      Inconsistent errors

    • B. 

      Facial groping

    • C. 

      Festination

    • D. 

      Unusual stress patterns

    • E. 

      Reduced word shapes

  • 21. 
    True or false: Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder with difficulty at the level of execution.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 22. 
    True or false: Dyspraxia is a motor speech disorder with difficulty at the level of planning or programming.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 23. 
    True or false: Joffee's note are shit
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      True

    • C. 

      True

    • D. 

      True

    • E. 

      True

  • 24. 
    What is the correct order for the 4 stages of intervention?
    • A. 

      Establish, generalise, maintain, stabilise

    • B. 

      Generalise, Stabilise, establish, maintain

    • C. 

      Establish, stabilise, generalise, maintain

    • D. 

      Maintain, generalise, stabilise, establish

    • E. 

      Stabilise, generalise, maintain, establish

  • 25. 
    Which of the following statement's is not true of intervention for multiple sound errors
    • A. 

      Requires a more holistic approach than 'one sound at a time'

    • B. 

      Targeting sound classes produces better results than 'one sound at a time'

    • C. 

      Meaningful contrast therapy is useful

    • D. 

      The child is doomed and there is nothing you can conceivably do to help the child