Professional Interpreter Aptitude Test: English/Vietnamese

15 Questions | Total Attempts: 65

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Professional Interpreter Aptitude Test: English/Vietnamese

This is an assessment to determine whether you have the basic command of the English and Vietnamese languages or not. And whether intensive training would benefit you in becoming a certified court interpreter and/or a professional conference interpreter.



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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A certified court interpreter is...
    • A. 

      A bilingual person who knows all the swear words and slang in both English and Vietnamese.

    • B. 

      Someone who has a strong command of both English and Vietnamese.

    • C. 

      A natural person who's been trained and tested, in writing and orally, and who successfully demonstrated an acceptable knowledge and skill base, as defined in Section 68566 of the California Government Code.

    • D. 

      Any bilingual person who was once "approved" by the court to help translate for someone.

    • E. 

      Anyone can call him or herself this title as long as his mother certifies it under penalty of perjury.

  • 2. 
    The titles "Interpreter" and "translator" really mean the same.
    • A. 

      Absolutely!

    • B. 

      God forbid, No!

    • C. 

      Not sure

    • D. 

      Who cares

  • 3. 
    Being able to speak Vietnamese or English is enough to become an interpreter. One does not need to be able to read or write Vietnamese or English.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      It depends

    • C. 

      False

  • 4. 
    The proper way to say the following sentence in Vietnamese is... "Good morning madam. Please tell us your full name and spell your name for the record. For the benefit of the court reporter, please say it slowly."
    • A. 

      Chào buổi sáng bà. Xin nói tên đầy đặn của bà và đánh vần từng chữ. Phóng viên yêu cầu bà từ từ."

    • B. 

      Good morning bà. Xin nói chúng tôi tên bà và đánh vần tên bà cho hồ sơ. Phóng viên tòa án yêu cầu bà, làm ơn nói chậm."

    • C. 

      Chào buổi sáng ma đàm. Làm ơn nói với chúng tôi tên nguyên của bà và đánh vần cho hồ sơ. Để giúp ích cho người phóng viên, xin nói chậm rải, dễ nghe.”

    • D. 

      “Xin chào bà. Xin cho biết nguyên tên của bà và đánh vần tên ra để ghi vào bút lục. Để giúp cho tốc ký viên, xin bà vui lòng đánh vần chậm.”

    • E. 

      All the above are correct.

  • 5. 
    The most sensible reason to become an interpreter is...
    • A. 

      An interpreter gets paid by the court and makes money on the side by charging defendants for extra help in explaining legal forms outside the courtroom.

    • B. 

      An interpreter with at least 10 years of experience makes at least $100K per year.

    • C. 

      It is rewarding to be able to help people, earn a decent income, and, at the same time, learn something new everyday.

    • D. 

      Interpreters are never unemployed.

  • 6. 
    “Làm đĩ 9 phương, chừa 1 phương lấy chồng” is most sensibly translated as…
    • A. 

      Be a hooker at 9 street corners, leave 1 to get married.

    • B. 

      Even if you prostitute yourself 9 times, on the 1 last time consider marrying your customer.

    • C. 

      Sell yourself short 9 out of 10 but leave a way out.

    • D. 

      You’ve gotta be good for something.

  • 7. 
    Read the following passage for the next few questions: Vợ chồng tôi qua Mỹ năm 1990, sau khi sống cực khổ dưới chế độ cộng sản.  Hồi mới qua tụi tui ăn queo-phe đi học.  Sau khi học xong bằng neo, tụi tui đi làm rồi sau đó mua được một căn nhà trệt.  Hồi đó không có tiền nhiều để “đao” nên tụi tui mua nhà trong khu Mỹ đen, cái chỗ gì mà rần rần, không mấy khi mà không mất ngủ.  Tụi nó cứ uống rượu, mở nhạc ầm ầm, chửi thề “phất du” rồi con tui nó mới bắt chước.  Tại vì cực khổ đi làm hoài nên con tui lớn lên mới hư, đi lấy Mỹ đen đó! The main idea this person tries to explain is…
    • A. 

      Why his/her child became sexually involved with a black person.

    • B. 

      How hard his/her family’s life has been.

    • C. 

      The achievements he/she made throughout the years.

    • D. 

      No idea. This person must have a very low education.

    • E. 

      Who knows. How dare he lets his daughter have sex with a black guy.

  • 8. 
    The closest equivalent translation for "Hồi mới qua tụi tui ăn queo-phe đi học" is...
    • A. 

      When we newly came we ate welfare to go to school.

    • B. 

      At the time of our early arrival, we enjoyed public assistance and attended school.

    • C. 

      After we settled here, we were on welfare and able to go to school.

    • D. 

      When we came, at the beginning Welfare sent us to school.

    • E. 

      None of the Above.

  • 9. 
    What level of register would you say this person used?
    • A. 

      Ordinary, average layperson's register.

    • B. 

      Extremely low register

    • C. 

      Low register

    • D. 

      So so register

    • E. 

      High register

  • 10. 
    The proper thing for an interpreter to do after hearing this speech is...
    • A. 

      Tell the guy to cut to the chase and stop beating around the bush.

    • B. 

      Give the gist of what he said because the rest is really not important.

    • C. 

      Deliver the closest equivalent into English but leave out terms or remarks that may be racially derogative.

    • D. 

      Say it like it is in English without missing a beat or a word.

    • E. 

      Inform the authority that you refuse to translate vulgar terms as it is not proper conduct for a professional interpreter.

  • 11. 
    Please read the following passage for the next few questions: The fact that a criminal charge has been filed against the defendant is not evidence that the charge is true.  You must not be biased against the defendant just because he hasbeen arrested, charged with a crime, or brought to trial. What's the purpose of this statement?
    • A. 

      This is an argument for the defendant because he may be not guilty after all.

    • B. 

      The judge is telling the jury that they should feel sorry for the defendant because the poor guy might not be guilty even when they arrested him, charged him with a crime, and brought him to trial.

    • C. 

      This is a typical statement a judge reads to the jury as part of the jury instruction. It explains one of the defendant's Constitutional rights.

    • D. 

      This is a bluff. Defense attorneys always throw out these things to confuse people about their client's guilt.

  • 12. 
    Based on this language, this case must be...
    • A. 

      Civil

    • B. 

      Quasi-criminal

    • C. 

      Criminal

    • D. 

      Dismissed

  • 13. 
    Jury instructions are...
    • A. 

      Only for formality. No one understands it anyway. Therefore, it does not have to be interpreted for the defendant.

    • B. 

      Very important. Without proper instructions, the jury might not know what to do. All important parts should be interpreted so the defendant knows what's going on.

    • C. 

      Should be treated like everything else spoken in the trial.

    • D. 

      Are for the jury and not the defendant. Because the judge is not talking to the defendant, he should just remain silent.

  • 14. 
    “Nhập gia tùy tục” is a saying with the best equivalent in English as…
    • A. 

      When in Rome do what the Romans do

    • B. 

      When you come to someone’s house, make yourself at home

    • C. 

      Take your shoes off when you come to a Vietnamese person’s house

    • D. 

      It’s not polite to bring sex into the conversation

  • 15. 
    An interpreter who has a broad knowledge of criminal law may give legal advice because he/she is an officer of the court. True or false. Reason?
    • A. 

      Heck no. Let the lawyers make money.

    • B. 

      Of course. It's a service to the public.

    • C. 

      Only a licensed attorney may give legal advice. No one else, including judges, may give legal advice.

    • D. 

      For free but not for pay.