Misplaced Modifiers Quiz Questions And Answers

Reviewed by Heather Baxter
Heather Baxter, BSc |
K-12 English Expert
Review Board Member
Heather is an educator, with four years of teaching experience. Heather graduated from the University of South Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Teaching. She is skilled in Teaching English as a Second Language and currently works as an Elementary School Teacher at Pinellas County Schools. She made a career transition one year ago to explore a new path in writing and copy editing. Heather's specialization lies in curriculum development and educational materials, but she maintains versatility to work across various industries. Known for her keen attention to detail and a deep passion for language, she possesses a sharp eye for precision.
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Misplaced Modifiers Quiz Questions And Answers - Quiz

Check out these misplaced modifiers quiz questions and answers and evaluate your knowledge regarding modifiers. Misplaced modifiers are words and phrases that modify a word or sentence. In other words, they seem to give a better understanding of a word or sentence. Grammar can be confusing at times, but regular practice can make it your favorite subject. Let's start today with this quiz. Shall we begin it now? All the best, buddy!


Misplaced Modifiers Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    Is the following statement true or false? A way to avoid misplaced modifiers is to place the modifier close to the word it modifies.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    By placing modifiers close to the words they modify, you can avoid misplaced modifiers that change the intended meaning of a sentence. 

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Which sentence contains a misplaced modifier?

    • A.

      While eating a croissant, Josh waved to the crowd.

    • B.

      Covered in fluffiness, the couple played with the kitten.

    • C.

      Having eaten lunch, the girl turned on the laptop.

    • D.

      While playing, Lancaster jumped on the feathers.

    Correct Answer
    B. Covered in fluffiness, the couple played with the kitten.
    Explanation
    The second sentence is the only one that does not make sense and has its modifier incorrect. In the sentence it sounds like the couple is fluffy, not the kitten.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Is the following sentence using correct grammar?While Lancaster was riding his bike, a bird swooped past. 

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    This sentence is correct because one knows that Lancaster is the one doing the action of riding, not the bird.

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Which revision correctly fixes the misplaced modifier in the sentence: "Staring out of the window, the rain poured down in torrents"?

    • A.

      Staring out of the window, torrents of rain poured down. 

    • B.

      The rain poured down in torrents while staring out of the window.

    • C.

      The rain poured down in torrents, staring out of the window.

    • D.

      The rain stared out of the window, pouring down in torrents.

    Correct Answer
    A. Staring out of the window, torrents of rain poured down. 
    Explanation
    This revision correctly repositions the modifier "Staring out of the window" next to the subject it is meant to modify, "rain," making the sentence clear and grammatically correct.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    What is the correct correction of this sentence? Having finished studying, the cookies began baking.

    • A.

      Change "began baking to begun baking."

    • B.

      Change "having finished to while finishing."

    • C.

      There is no error in this sentence.

    • D.

      None of the above.

    Correct Answer
    D. None of the above.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is the last one because the sentence has a misplaced modifier. An example of the sentence corrected: Having finished studying, we began baking cookies.

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Which of the following sentences does not contain a misplaced modifier?

    • A.

      Dyed purple, Bella enjoys the blanket.

    • B.

      Pulled apart, Chris ate the kettle corn bag.

    • C.

      Jumping up, the kitten caught the treat.

    • D.

      Eating the kettle corn, the bag crunched,

    Correct Answer
    C. Jumping up, the kitten caught the treat.
    Explanation
    The third option is correct because the phrase “jumping up” describes the kitten, and the sentence makes sense.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Which of the following sentences contains a misplaced modifier? 

    • A.

      Running quickly, the marathon was completed by Sarah.

    • B.

      The cat chased the mouse with sharp claws.

    Correct Answer
    A. Running quickly, the marathon was completed by Sarah.
    Explanation
    In this sentence, the phrase "Running quickly" is meant to modify Sarah, but it is incorrectly positioned at the beginning of the sentence, making it seem like the marathon itself was running quickly.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Is this statement true or false?A misplaced modifier is always an adjective.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    A misplaced modifier can be either a word or an entire phrase.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Which option most logically completes the sentence? Having driven around the block,

    • A.

      Notebook crashed.

    • B.

      Lance crashed the car.

    • C.

      The feather crashed the car.

    • D.

      The tree began to sway.

    Correct Answer
    B. Lance crashed the car.
    Explanation
    The sentence that makes the most sense is that Lance, the name of a person, crashed the car. The other three subjects are inanimate objects and do not make sense driving the car.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Is this sentence correct? While typing on the computer, the kitten sat down.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The sentence contains a misplaced modifier. It makes it sound like the kitten was the one typing.

    Rate this question:

Heather Baxter |BSc |
K-12 English Expert
Heather is an educator, with four years of teaching experience. Heather graduated from the University of South Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and Teaching. She is skilled in Teaching English as a Second Language and currently works as an Elementary School Teacher at Pinellas County Schools. She made a career transition one year ago to explore a new path in writing and copy editing. Heather's specialization lies in curriculum development and educational materials, but she maintains versatility to work across various industries. Known for her keen attention to detail and a deep passion for language, she possesses a sharp eye for precision.

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 08, 2024
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    Heather Baxter
  • Sep 20, 2014
    Quiz Created by
    Tkcermak
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