2115 Univariate Data - Stem & Leaf Plots

8 Questions | Total Attempts: 601

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2115 Univariate Data - Stem & Leaf Plots

Stem & Leaf, Split Stem & Leaf Plots and Back-to-Back Stem & Leaf plots


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 2. 
    Back-to-back stem & leaf plots allow you to :
    • A. 

      Map your data on the left, and sort it on the right

    • B. 

      See how skewed your data set is

    • C. 

      Compare the distribution of two data sets

    • D. 

      Split your data set into two similar sizes

    • E. 

      Compare the upper values with the lower values

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 3. 
    Back-to-back stem & leaf plots have :
    • A. 

      Larger values

    • B. 

      A common stem

    • C. 

      Smaller values

    • D. 

      A normal distribution

    • E. 

      A neutral distribution

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 4. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 5. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 6. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 7. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 8. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 9. 
    The image above is :
    • A. 

      A stem & leaf plot

    • B. 

      A split stem & leaf plot

    • C. 

      A back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • D. 

      A back-to-back split stem & leaf plot

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 10. 
    The image above is stem and leaf plot. How many 'splits' does it have?
    • A. 

      None, its just an ordinary stem and leaf plot

    • B. 

      Two splits

    • C. 

      Three splits

    • D. 

      Five splits

    • E. 

      I don't know

  • 11. 
    When do we split a stem & leaf plot?
    • A. 

      When there are too many leaves to see a shape

    • B. 

      When the shape is negatively skewed

    • C. 

      When we suspect there are outliers

    • D. 

      When the shape is positively skewed

    • E. 

      When here are too few numbers on a branch

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 12. 
    How many values do you need in a data set for a stem and leaf plot to be useful?
    • A. 

      Less than 12

    • B. 

      More than 80

    • C. 

      More than 200

    • D. 

      Between 10 & 15

    • E. 

      More than 5 but less than 50

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 13. 
    Back-to-back stem & leaf plots allow you to :
    • A. 

      Map your data on the left, and sort it on the right

    • B. 

      See how skewed your data set is

    • C. 

      Compare two data sets

    • D. 

      Split your data set into two similar sizes

    • E. 

      Compare the upper values with the lower values

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 14. 
    Using a split stem & leaf plot can help :
    • A. 

      Compress the data

    • B. 

      Simplify the data

    • C. 

      Reveal features that were not easily detected

    • D. 

      Hide features that are easily detected

    • E. 

      Reduce the number of errors

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 15. 
    In a stem & leaf plot, outliers can be hidden if :
    • A. 

      There are too many intervals in a stem

    • B. 

      We multiply the interquartile range by 1.5

    • C. 

      They are left out of the range

    • D. 

      There are too few intervals on the stem

    • E. 

      The interquartile range is large

    • F. 

      I don't know

  • 16. 
    In a stem & leaf plot, we can detect the general shape of the distribution by :
    • A. 

      Counting the total number of leaves and dividing by the stem

    • B. 

      Counting the number of stems and dividing the leaves

    • C. 

      Turning the stem counter-clockwise so it is horizontal

    • D. 

      Mirroring the stem in a clockwise direction

    • E. 

      Finding the range and the IQR

  • 17. 
    I collect data for 40 adults relating to the number of hours they watch television per week. I create a stem & leaf plot and the data which ends up with three intervals on the stem.What should I do?
    • A. 

      Create a histogram instead

    • B. 

      Use a dot plot instead

    • C. 

      Split the stem into intervals of two

    • D. 

      Split the stem into intervals of 10

    • E. 

      Create a back-to-back stem & leaf plot

    • F. 

      Three intervals is enough for 40 pieces of data, leave it how it is.

  • 18. 
    A stem & leaf plot is ideal for :
    • A. 

      Ordering data

    • B. 

      Finding the median

    • C. 

      Finding the modal class

    • D. 

      Finding the max & min

    • E. 

      Finding the mean

    • F. 

      Finding the standard deviation

    • G. 

      Counting z-scores

  • 19. 
    A stem & leaf plot is ideal for :
    • A. 

      Ordering data

    • B. 

      Separating categorical data

    • C. 

      Finding the mean

    • D. 

      Finding the standard deviation

    • E. 

      Counting z-scores

  • 20. 
    I have collected the scores for the latest Geography test, and created the stem & leaf plot above.If the value '0' is an outlier, and I'm not saying if it is or it isn't, what is my range?
  • 21. 
    I collected the results for the latest Geography test and sorted them into the stem & leaf plot above.Is the minimum value an outlier?
    • A. 

      Zero is never considered an outlier

    • B. 

      No, there must be two gaps to make it an outlier.

    • C. 

      Probably, but I'd need to check

    • D. 

      Yes, because zero is always considered to be an outlier

    • E. 

      No because outliers are always on a positive skew

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