Newton's 2nd Law Exam Questions! Quiz

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Matt Balanda, BS, Science |
Physics Expert
Review Board Member
Matt graduated with a Master's in Educational Leadership for Faith-Based Schools from California Baptist University and a Bachelor's of Science in Aerospace Engineering and Mathematics from the University of Arizona. A devoted leader, transitioned from Aerospace Engineering to inspire students. As the High School Vice-Principal and a skilled Physics teacher at Calvary Chapel Christian School, his passion is nurturing a love for learning and deepening students' connection with God, fostering a transformative educational journey.
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Newtons 2nd Law Exam Questions! Quiz - Quiz


Welcome to Newton's 2nd Law Exam Questions Quiz, where you'll test your understanding of one of the fundamental principles in classical mechanics. The quiz will challenge your knowledge of various aspects of Newton's second law, including its mathematical representation, practical applications, and the relationships between force, mass, and acceleration in different scenarios. Prepare to dive into questions that explore scenarios involving objects of varying masses subjected to different forces, requiring you to calculate accelerations or forces in different contexts. You may encounter problems related to real-world applications, such as understanding the forces acting on vehicles, projectiles, or objects experiencing Read morefriction. This quiz aims to assess your grasp of Newton's 2nd Law and its implications in solving dynamic problems, ensuring you leave with a solid understanding of how force and motion are intricately connected according to this fundamental principle. Good luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Compared to a 1kg block of solid iron, a 2kg block of solid iron has twice as much:

    • A.

      Inertia

    • B.

      Mass

    • C.

      Volume

    • D.

      All

    • E.

      None

    Correct Answer
    D. All
    Explanation
    A 2kg block of solid iron has twice as much inertia, mass, and volume compared to a 1kg block of solid iron. Inertia is the resistance of an object to changes in its motion, and since the 2kg block has more mass, it will have more inertia. Mass is the amount of matter in an object, and the 2kg block has double the mass of the 1kg block. Volume refers to the amount of space an object occupies, and the 2kg block will also have twice the volume of the 1kg block. Therefore, all of these properties are doubled in the 2kg block compared to the 1kg block.

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  • 2. 

    An object weighs 30N on earth. A second object weighs 30N on the moon. Which the greater mass? (Note: due to its size, the moon has less gravity than the earth.)

    • A.

      Object on moon

    • B.

      Object on earth

    • C.

      Same mass

    • D.

      Depends on air resistance

    Correct Answer
    A. Object on moon
  • 3. 

    One object had twice as much mass as another object. The first object also has twice as much:

    • A.

      Volume

    • B.

      Gravitational acceleration

    • C.

      Inertia

    • D.

      Velocity

    Correct Answer
    C. Inertia
    Explanation
    Inertia is the property of an object that resists changes in its motion. When an object has more mass, it also has more inertia. This means that it will be more resistant to changes in its velocity or direction of motion. In this scenario, since the first object has twice as much mass as the second object, it will also have twice as much inertia. The other options, such as volume, gravitational acceleration, and velocity, are not directly related to an object's mass and therefore do not necessarily increase in the same proportion.

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  • 4. 

    An object is propelled along a straight-line path by force. If the net force were doubled, its acceleration would:

    • A.

      Halve

    • B.

      Double

    • C.

      Quadruple

    • D.

      Stay the same

    Correct Answer
    B. Double
    Explanation
    If the net force acting on an object is doubled, according to Newton's second law of motion, the acceleration of the object will also double. This is because acceleration is directly proportional to the net force applied to an object. Therefore, if the net force is increased by a factor of two, the acceleration will also increase by a factor of two.

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  • 5. 

    The force of friction on a sliding object is 10 newtons. The applied force needed to maintain a constant velocity is:

    • A.

      Less than 10N

    • B.

      More than 10N

    • C.

      10N

    Correct Answer
    C. 10N
    Explanation
    The applied force needed to maintain a constant velocity is 10N. This is because the force of friction on a sliding object is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the applied force. In order for the object to continue moving at a constant velocity, the applied force must balance out the force of friction. Therefore, the applied force needs to be equal to the force of friction, which is 10N in this case.

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  • 6. 

    A 10N falling object encounters 4N of air resistance. The net force on the object is:

    • A.

      4N

    • B.

      0N

    • C.

      6N

    • D.

      10N

    • E.

      None of the above

    Correct Answer
    C. 6N
    Explanation
    When an object is falling, it experiences two forces: gravity pulling it downwards and air resistance pushing against it. In this case, the object has a gravitational force of 10N pulling it downwards, while the air resistance exerts a force of 4N in the opposite direction. The net force is the vector sum of these two forces, which can be calculated by subtracting the smaller force (4N) from the larger force (10N). Therefore, the net force on the object is 10N - 4N = 6N.

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  • 7. 

    Which of the following has zero acceleration? An object

    • A.

      Moving at a constant velocity

    • B.

      At rest

    • C.

      At equilibrium

    • D.

      All of the above

    Correct Answer
    D. All of the above
    Explanation
    All of the above options have zero acceleration. An object moving at a constant velocity has zero acceleration because its speed and direction do not change. An object at rest also has zero acceleration because it is not moving. An object at equilibrium, where all the forces acting on it are balanced, also has zero acceleration because there is no net force acting on it. Therefore, all three options have zero acceleration.

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  • 8. 

    A 10kg block with an initial velocity of 10m/s slides 10m across a horizontal surface and comes to rest. It takes the block 2 seconds to stop. The stopping force acting on the block is about:

    • A.

      5N

    • B.

      10N

    • C.

      25N

    • D.

      50N

    Correct Answer
    D. 50N
    Explanation
    The stopping force acting on the block can be calculated using the equation F = m * a, where F is the force, m is the mass, and a is the acceleration. In this case, the block comes to rest, so its final velocity is 0 m/s. Using the equation v = u + at, where v is the final velocity, u is the initial velocity, a is the acceleration, and t is the time taken, we can find the acceleration. Rearranging the equation, we have a = (v - u) / t. Plugging in the values, we get a = (0 - 10) / 2 = -5 m/s^2. Now, we can use Newton's second law to find the stopping force (F):
    F=ma
    Where:
    m is the mass of the block,
    a is the acceleration.
    F=(10kg)×(−5m/s2)
    F=−50N
    The negative sign in the force indicates that the force is acting in the opposite direction to the initial velocity, representing the force that is slowing down the block. So, the stopping force acting on the block is 50 N.

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  • 9. 

    A 10kg block is pushed across a horizontal surface with a horizontal force of 20N against a friction force of 10N. The acceleration of the block in meters per second per second is:

    • A.

      1

    • B.

      5

    • C.

      2

    • D.

      10

    Correct Answer
    A. 1
    Explanation
    The acceleration of an object can be calculated using Newton's second law of motion, which states that the acceleration is equal to the net force acting on the object divided by its mass. In this case, the net force is the force pushing the block (20N) minus the friction force (10N), resulting in a net force of 10N. Since the mass of the block is 10kg, the acceleration can be calculated as 10N/10kg = 1 m/s^2. Therefore, the correct answer is 1.

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  • 10. 

    A hockey puck is set in motion across a frozen pond. If ice friction and air resistance are neglected, the force required to keep the puck sliding at constant velocity is:

    • A.

      Equal to the weight of the puck

    • B.

      The weight of the puck divided by the mass of the puck

    • C.

      The mass of the puck multiplied by 9.8 m/s

    • D.

      Zero newtons

    Correct Answer
    D. Zero newtons
    Explanation
    The correct answer is zero newtons because if ice friction and air resistance are neglected, there are no external forces acting on the puck to slow it down or speed it up. Therefore, no force is required to keep the puck sliding at a constant velocity.

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Matt Balanda |BS, Science |
Physics Expert
Matt graduated with a Master's in Educational Leadership for Faith-Based Schools from California Baptist University and a Bachelor's of Science in Aerospace Engineering and Mathematics from the University of Arizona. A devoted leader, transitioned from Aerospace Engineering to inspire students. As the High School Vice-Principal and a skilled Physics teacher at Calvary Chapel Christian School, his passion is nurturing a love for learning and deepening students' connection with God, fostering a transformative educational journey.

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  • Apr 22, 2024
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  • Dec 10, 2009
    Quiz Created by
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