Simulation University Entrance Exam

69 Questions | Total Attempts: 97

SettingsSettingsSettings
Simulation University Entrance Exam - Quiz

Đề thi gồm có 2 phần là phần trắc nghiệm và phần tự luận. Các bạn có 90 phút để hoàn thành cả 2 phần thi này. Chúc các bạn thi tốt :D


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in pronunciation in each of the following questions.
  • 2. 
    Mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of the primary stress in each of the following questions.
  • 3. 
    Mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that best completes each of the following sentences.
  • 4. 
    Mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
  • 5. 
    Mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the word(s) SIMILAR in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
  • 6. 
    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the correct answer to each of the questions from 30 to 39. 
  • 7. 
    Like Earth, the sun has several different forms of visible activity, or weather. But unlike Earth, the sun’s weather is created by forces deep within the sun rather than in its atmosphere. The sun is made of electrically charged particles, which create a strong magnetic field around the sun. Because the sun rotates slightly faster at its equator than it does at its poles, this magnetic field slowly gets pulled out of balance. A helpful analogy, is to think of sun’s magnetic field as a giant rubber band. As the sun rotates, the rubber band slowly twists, becoming tighter and tigher.It is this rising imbalance in its magnetic field that gives the sun its first form of weather. As the magnetic field of the sun gets twisted, it gets focused on one part of the sun’s surface, resulting in an area where the magnetic field is much stronger than on the rest of the sun. This incredibly strong magnetic field prevents heat from rising up from the center of the sun to this area of the surface. The result is an area of the sun’s surface which is cooler than the rest of the surface. Because they are cooler than the rest of the sun, these sunspots appear to be darker. These dark spots can be several times the size of Earth, and astronomers have noticed them for hundreds of years. Sunspots appear to follow an 11-year cycle of activity. Although no one has been able to adequately explain the causes for this cycle as of yet, it seems that the height of the cycle represents the time of greatest imbalance in the sun’s magnetic field, resulting in more sunspots.Eventually, the magnetic field around a sunspot will become so twisted that it will snap. All the energy that has been stored in the twists of the magnetic field will be released in one moment. The result is a huge jump in temperature called a solar flare. In as little as ten seconds, the temperature will rise to as much as 20 million degrees, up from about 1 billion. Solar flares also release huge amounts of radiation, primarily in the form of X-rays, into space. When this radiation reaches the Earth, it can damage satellites and affect weather pattern.
  • 8. 
    Mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following questions
  • 9. 
    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that best fits each of the numbered blanks from 45 to 54.
  • 10. 
    Until about 250 years ago, households did not take dirt as (45) …………………… as they do now – it was a fact of life, and that was that. Cleaning often consisted of an annual (46) …………………… called ‘spring cleaning’ when the furniture was moved aside, and all the linen products in the house were cleaned. Carpets and rugs were taken outside, hung on ropes and had the dust (47) …………………… out of them – an exhausting and messy process.The industrial revolution brought about a major change – as new (48) …………………… became available to make homes cleaner, a corresponding interest in ‘domestic hygiene’ appeared in households. This in turn led to the (49) …………………… of further products, one of (50) …………………… was the vacuum cleaner.(51) …………………… has it that when one of the first vacuum cleaners was demonstrated, a kindly scientist took the proud inventor (52) ……………………, and offered a bit of advice that was to become (53) …………………… to the future evolution of the product – ‘make it suck, not blow’.The first vacuum cleaners appeared in the 1860s in the United States. They were operated by hand pumps and were almost as laborious as spring cleaning. It was only when electric motors had become sufficiently advanced to become portable (54) …………………… vacuum cleaners became common household items. Most of today's major makes – including Electrolux and Hoover – were born in the 1920s.
  • 11. 
    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the questions from 55 to 64.
  • 12. 
    Primitive man found out by trial and error how to carry out a certain number of simple chemical changes, but under the ancient Egyptian civilization men learned how to work copper, tin, iron and precious metals; knew how to make pottery, glass, soap and colouring agents, and how to bleach and dye textile fabrics. These arts were the beginnings of the chemical industries of today.The early scientific study of chemistry, known as alchemy, grew up in the first few centuries A.D. at Alexandria in Egypt. There two important things came together: one was the practical knowledge of the Egyptian workers in metals, pottery and dyes; the other was the learning of the earlier Greek philosophers, such as Hippocrates and Aristotle. At the same time alchemy was much influenced by ideas from the East about magic and astrology – foretelling the future from the stars.Greek philosophers regarded debate about the nature of matter as superior to experiment, and some held that all matter was made up of the same four ‘elements’ – earth, fire, air and water. Many people therefore thought that if these elements could be rearranged, one substance could be changed into another. For instance, a base metal could perhaps be turned into gold. The chief aim of the alchemists was to find a way of doing this.Alchemy came under Arab influence when the armies of Islam conquered Egypt during the seventh century. The Arabs carried its study into Western Europe when they advanced into Spain. Many Arabic words are still used in chemistry – ‘alkali’, ‘alcohol’ and even ‘alchemy’ itself, which means ‘the art of Egypt’. The greatest Arab alchemist was Jabir ibn Hayyan, possibly the same person as Geber, author of two important books on alchemy known from the Latin translations of the thirteenth century. Jabir claimed that mercury and sulphur were ‘elements’ like the four Greek ones. He said that all metals were composed of mercury and sulphur in different proportions. To change a base metal into gold required the proportions to be changed by the action of a mysterious substance which came to be called ‘the philosopher's stone’. Alchemists searched in vain for this substance for several hundred years. Alchemy was studied widely in Europe during the twelfth and following centuries, and attracted the attention of many learned men. Though they were doomed to fail in their attempts to make gold, their work led to the growth of a great deal of new chemical knowledge and of methods of making experiments. Many of the later European alchemists, however, were complete frauds who preyed upon trusting people by all sorts of tricks, and the subject fell into disrepute. By the first half of the sixteenth century, the aim of the alchemists had changed from the making of gold to the making of medicines. In particular they sought a fanciful substance called ‘the elixir of life’, a powerful medicine which was to cure all ills, and which some people thought would turn out to be the same substance as ‘the philosopher's stone’. This phase of chemistry lasted till about 1700.From Practical Faster Reading by Gerald Mosback and Vivien Mosback, CUP
  • 13. 
    Question 1
    • A. 

      A. thesis

    • B. 

      B. southern

    • C. 

      C. south

    • D. 

      D. theme

  • 14. 
    Question 2
    • A. 

      A. liked

    • B. 

      B. laughed

    • C. 

      C. wicked

    • D. 

      D. kissed

  • 15. 
    Question 3
    • A. 

      A. physician

    • B. 

      B. orchestra

    • C. 

      C. statistic

    • D. 

      D. endeavor

  • 16. 
    Question 4
    • A. 

      A. revere

    • B. 

      B. confer

    • C. 

      C. exclude

    • D. 

      D. decoy

  • 17. 
    Question 5
    • A. 

      A. principal

    • B. 

      B. integral

    • C. 

      C. ambitious

    • D. 

      D. receptive

  • 18. 
    Question 6: I have learned to _________  my bed in the morning since I was a little child. 
    • A. 

      A. do

    • B. 

      B. create

    • C. 

      C. clean

    • D. 

      D. make

  • 19. 
    Question 7: If she _________ him, she would have stayed with him.
    • A. 

      Had loved

    • B. 

      Loves

    • C. 

      Loved

    • D. 

      Has loved

  • 20. 
    Question 8: It would be _________ for your health to eat less junk food and exercise more.
    • A. 

      A. beneficial

    • B. 

      B. inorganic

    • C. 

      C. inactive

    • D. 

      D. controversial

  • 21. 
    Question 9: Peter and John are in a coffee shop. Choose the most suitable response to fill in the blank in the following exchange.    – Peter: “Do you fancy a coffee?”    – John: “.................................”
    • A. 

      A. Oh, dear!

    • B. 

      B. Everything is OK.

    • C. 

      C. Oh, yes. I’d love one.

    • D. 

      D. How do you do, Peter?

  • 22. 
    Question 10: Nobody likes the play, ..............................?
    • A. 

      A. do they

    • B. 

      B. don’t they

    • C. 

      C. didn’t they

    • D. 

      D. did they

  • 23. 
    Question 11: Not only ................................ to determine the depth of the ocean floor, but it is also used to locate oil.
    • A. 

      A. to use seismology

    • B. 

      B. is seismology used

    • C. 

      C. seismology is used

    • D. 

      D. using seismology

  • 24. 
    Question 12: Starting in the 19th century, public education in the United States ........................................ the development of and advanced industrial society.
    • A. 

      A. consumed

    • B. 

      B. transformed

    • C. 

      C. conducted

    • D. 

      D. nourished

  • 25. 
    Question 13: The restaurant is popular with film stars and the .............................................
    • A. 

      A. like

    • B. 

      B. similar

    • C. 

      C. same

    • D. 

      D. such

Back to Top Back to top