Which Lord Of The Rings Character Are You? Quiz

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| By Robert Palmer
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Robert Palmer
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 33,658
Questions: 12 | Attempts: 34,023

Which Lord Of The Rings Character Are You? Quiz - Quiz

Try this "Which Lord of the Rings Character Are You?" quiz to find out which character your personality resonates with. Rather than just giving 4 to 6 possible results, this test includes 24 Lord of The Rings characters to bring you a more accurate parallel.
Each character embodies unique traits, strengths, and virtues, reflecting the diversity and depth of Tolkien's storytelling. Gandalf, the wise and enigmatic wizard, symbolizes guidance and mentorship. Aragorn, the valiant ranger and king, epitomizes courage and leadership. Frodo, the humble hobbit thrust into greatness, represents resilience and selflessness. Just try to answer honestly. Lord Of Read moreThe Rings is a story of epic proportions which will enthrall you in its fantasy. Have fun, and don't forget to share this quiz with other Lord Of The Ring fans!


Lord of the Rings Character Questions and Answers

  • 1. 

    A bag of apples has been stolen, and your schoolmaster is searching for the culprit. You know that your friend is responsible. Do you turn him in for a thrashing?

    • A.

      I could never do such a thing to my friend.

    • B.

      I have to, or I'm as guilty as he.

    • C.

      Naturally, he must pay for his transgression.

    • D.

      I'll convince him to share the apples to make my 'cooperation' more 'appealing.'

    • E.

      No. I'll simply use my knowledge to force him to surrender the apples to me.

    • F.

      I'll try to convince him to own up by himself.

  • 2. 

    Later in life, you and your friend joined the army together, but he fled the company on the eve of battle. As a member of the search party, you have just discovered him. He looks ready to do something desperate. If you turn him in, he will be shot for desertion. What would you do?

    • A.

      My duty must be done; sound the alarm.

    • B.

      My own safety must come first. I'll shoot him before he shoots me.

    • C.

      I never wanted to find him. Call all clear.

    • D.

      Call others so we can all take him together.

    • E.

      I'll try to talk him into giving himself up and facing his own actions and their consequences.

    • F.

      I'll quietly join him in desertion.

  • 3. 

    You are a landlord, and one of your tenants, a kindly old man, is asking for more time to pay his dues. You have already granted him several extensions, and you are beginning to realize that he will never be able to pay it all. What would you do?

    • A.

      I would like to forgive him the debt, but then nobody would want to pay, and where would I be then? I'll evict him.

    • B.

      It's a pity, but I'll have to evict him and confiscate goods of value equal to the debt.

    • C.

      I'll throw him out and claim everything he has against his debt. It's unlikely that it will cover my costs anyway.

    • D.

      I'll forgive the debt and suffer the financial consequences.

    • E.

      I'll secretly send him the money to pay me so that the other tenants won't cause trouble.

    • F.

      I'll give him the time he's begging for, even though I doubt it could possibly make anything better.

  • 4. 

    Along the road, you pass a gravely wounded man lying in the ditch. It seems he has been robbed and left for dead. What would you do?

    • A.

      Rush to his aid and provide for his needs giving him your personal care, attention, and shelter.

    • B.

      Help him back to the nearest refuge and pay for his care and living until he returns to health.

    • C.

      This could be a trap, and it's certainly dangerous about here either way. I'll pass by and hurry on.

    • D.

      This poor wretch is not my concern. I'll pass by.

    • E.

      I'll take the opportunity to poke some pointy things into him just to see the anguish on his face before he dies.

    • F.

      I'll just take a peek and see if the robbers have left anything of value. This man will surely die soon, anyway.

  • 5. 

    You and your allies are surrounded by your enemies. They will attack at dawn. The odds seem insurmountable. What course would you take?

    • A.

      I'd say my farewells and prepare my heart and soul for the final effort and for death.

    • B.

      I'd sneak out in the dead of night and maybe try to get help. No sense in everyone dying.

    • C.

      I'd call a truce and try to negotiate the most favorable terms I can with the enemy commander.

    • D.

      I'd charge the enemy with my friends at my side in a glorious pre-emptive strike. We'll sell out lives dearly.

    • E.

      I would sneak off to the enemy camp and reveal our weakest positions to them to gain their favor.

    • F.

      I would surrender, beg for mercy and promise rich ransoms.

    • G.

      I would do all in my power to make it possible for some of my friends to escape, even at the cost of my own safety.

  • 6. 

    During your travels, a knave tries to rob you! In the ensuing struggle, he loses his footing and is soon dangling helplessly from a cliff. He begs for your mercy and swears that should you help him, he will do much to repay you and abandon his rotten ways. How might you react?

    • A.

      Leave him there in the mess he got himself into.

    • B.

      Help him up and give him the chance to prove and redeem himself.

    • C.

      Stamp on his fingers until he falls. You can't be too careful around fellows like this.

    • D.

      Haul him up and try to capture him and take him before the appropriate authorities to face his crimes.

    • E.

      Walk to the base of the cliff to salvage whatever valuables might be left when the rogue's fingers give out.

    • F.

      Pull him up, but only so that you can deal with him at your leisure. He won't be bothering any more travelers.

  • 7. 

    You are the Kapitan of a Kriegsmarine U-boat that has just torpedoed a tanker in the middle of the Atlantic. The waters around the stricken vessel are dotted with her crew struggling to stay afloat. The latest order from Berlin explicitly prohibits U-boat crews from aiding their victims. What would you do?

    • A.

      Their fate is regrettable, but orders are orders, and we can't expect to win the war if we don't follow them.

    • B.

      If I help them, they'll certainly hear of it in Berlin, and I'll be in hot water. Besides, it's risky to take enemies aboard.

    • C.

      To blaze with Berlin, get those men out of the water if it costs me my commission!

    • D.

      I'll surface and throw them some life jackets, supplies, and an inflatable raft, then request that my men keep this incident to themselves.

    • E.

      I'll surface the boat, open fire on any survivors, and use the deck gun on any lifeboats if necessary. This is war, after all.

    • F.

      I'll abandon the patrol, set a course for the base and resign my commission when I arrive.

  • 8. 

    A friend of yours is to be executed on the morrow for a crime of which she is innocent. You are attempting a daring rescue. You have successfully infiltrated the prison, but a single warden is posted directly between you and her cell. How might you proceed?

    • A.

      I will try to incapacitate the warden but spare his life, even if this diminishes my chances of success significantly.

    • B.

      My friend's life is worth more than his. I will cut him down before he knows what is happening.

    • C.

      I will employ a ruse. I will stride confidently by him as though I had every right to be there.

    • D.

      I will stride confidently up to him as though I had every right to be there and gut him as soon as I get close.

    • E.

      I will try to pay off the guard to let me and my friend pass.

    • F.

      I will wait patiently lest he should leave his post for any reason before dawn.

    • G.

      I will attempt to distract the guard from his post so that I might slip by unnoticed, even if it increases my chances of getting caught.

    • H.

      I will desperately try to find another way around before dawn.

  • 9. 

    What is it that you admire most in others?

    • A.

      Courage and bravery

    • B.

      Beauty of person

    • C.

      Beauty of soul

    • D.

      The bonds of friendship and loyalty

    • E.

      The ambition to take what is before you and push yourself

    • F.

      Great knowledge and scholarship

    • G.

      A sense of duty and service

    • H.

      Great leadership and charisma

    • I.

      Modesty and humility

  • 10. 

    You are in command of a company of men  and in the middle of a hard and drawn-out campaign. Your men are weary and hungry. In the wake of a recent engagement, your section came into possession of a considerable number of captured horses. What would you do with them?

    • A.

      We don't have the resources to feed and care for them. I'll let them go.

    • B.

      War is hard on everyone. These horses will work for us in spite of the harsh conditions and how little we are able to feed them.

    • C.

      My men and the campaign must come first. I'll get all the work I can out of them, but they will have to graze for food as we cannot spare supplies.

    • D.

      I'll use only the hardiest horses so that I might take better care of them. The rest shall go free.

    • E.

      They cannot be allowed to fall into enemy hands. I'll have them all put-down.

    • F.

      Supplies are scarce, and horse flesh is nutritious. It's a pity, but we must do all we can for the effort.

  • 11. 

    How might you best spend a Saturday afternoon?

    • A.

      Enjoying the outdoors.

    • B.

      Entertaining guests or hosting a celebration.

    • C.

      Expanding my mind and advancing my knowledge.

    • D.

      Having a quiet and relaxed visit with one or two of my closest friends.

    • E.

      Composing or performing a song or verse.

    • F.

      Reading or writing histories and personal memoirs.

    • G.

      With a good bit of friendly sport.

    • H.

      I am a busy person and have little time for leisure.

  • 12. 

    Which of the following virtues do you most severely lack?

    • A.

      Benevolence

    • B.

      Purity

    • C.

      Diligence

    • D.

      Humility

    • E.

      Compassion

    • F.

      Patience

    • G.

      Temperance

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  • Current Version
  • Mar 28, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Sep 26, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Robert Palmer
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