Five Types Of Phrases Quiz

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Five Types Of Phrases Quiz - Quiz

In the first section, fill in the blanks, defining the five types of phrases.
In the second section, write an original sentence, using one type of phrase for each.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    A word that shows the relation of a noun or pronoun to some other word in the sentence and its accompanying noun, noun equivalent, or pronoun. Ex: on the table

    Explanation
    A preposition is a word that establishes a relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in a sentence, typically indicating location, direction, or time. For example, in "on the table," the preposition "on" shows the relationship of placement between "the table" and an object or action.

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  • 2. 

    To + a verb and its modifiers. Ex: To eat quickly

    Explanation
    The correct answer is a list of different types of phrases that can follow the preposition "to" and a verb. A prepositional phrase is a phrase that starts with a preposition (in this case, "to") and includes a noun or pronoun. An infinitive phrase is a phrase that starts with an infinitive verb (e.g., "to eat") and includes any modifiers. An appositive phrase is a phrase that renames or identifies a noun or pronoun (e.g., "to eat quickly" could be further modified by an appositive phrase like "to eat quickly, my favorite activity"). A participial phrase is a phrase that starts with a participle (e.g., "to eat quickly, devouring the food"). A gerund phrase is a phrase that starts with a gerund (e.g., "to eat quickly, eating is enjoyable").

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  • 3. 

    Second noun placed beside the first noun to explain it more fully and its modifiers. Ex: Mr. Spezia, the English teacher down the hall, ate a pizza.

    Explanation
    The given correct answer for this question is "Prepositional Phrase, Infinitive Phrase, Appositive Phrase, Participial Phrase, Gerund Phrase."

    An appositive phrase is a noun or pronoun placed beside another noun or pronoun to explain or identify it more fully. In the example given, "the English teacher down the hall" is an appositive phrase that further describes or identifies Mr. Spezia.

    A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begins with a preposition and usually ends with a noun or pronoun. It provides additional information about the noun or pronoun in the sentence. There is no specific example of a prepositional phrase given in the question.

    An infinitive phrase is a group of words that begins with an infinitive (to + verb) and may include objects or modifiers. There is no specific example of an infinitive phrase given in the question.

    A participial phrase is a group of words that includes a participle (a verb form that functions as an adjective) and its modifiers or complements. There is no specific example of a participial phrase given in the question.

    A gerund phrase is a group of words that begins with a gerund (a verb form ending in -ing that functions as a noun) and its modifiers or complements. There is no specific example of a gerund phrase given in the question.

    Therefore, the correct answer is that all of the given options (Prepositional Phrase, Infinitive Phrase, Appositive Phrase, Participial Phrase, Gerund Phrase) can be used to place a second noun beside the first noun to explain it more fully and its modifiers.

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  • 4. 

    Verb used as an adjective and its modifiers.  Ex: The girl, driving the red car, caused the accident.

    Explanation
    The given sentence "The girl, driving the red car, caused the accident" contains multiple phrases that modify the noun "girl". The phrase "driving the red car" is a participial phrase because it starts with the present participle "driving" and functions as an adjective to describe the girl. The phrase "the red car" is a prepositional phrase because it starts with the preposition "of" and functions as an adjective to describe the car. The phrase "the girl" is the main noun phrase and does not fit into any of the given options. Therefore, the correct answer is Participial Phrase, Prepositional Phrase.

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  • 5. 

    Verb used as a noun and its modifiers. Ex: Wrapping Christmas presents is tedious.

    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Prepositional Phrase, Infinitive Phrase, Appositive Phrase, Participial Phrase, Gerund Phrase." This answer suggests that the sentence contains all five types of phrases: prepositional phrase (e.g., "of Christmas presents"), infinitive phrase (e.g., "to wrap Christmas presents"), appositive phrase (e.g., "Wrapping Christmas presents"), participial phrase (e.g., "Wrapping Christmas presents is tedious"), and gerund phrase (e.g., "Wrapping Christmas presents").

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  • 6. 

    Write an example of a sentence using a prepositional phrase:

  • 7. 

    Write an example of a sentence using an infinitive phrase:

  • 8. 

    Write an example of a sentence using an appositive phrase:

  • 9. 

    Write an example of a sentence using a participial phrase:

  • 10. 

    Write an example of a sentence using a gerund phrase:

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  • Current Version
  • May 13, 2024
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Apr 18, 2011
    Quiz Created by
    Johnsmiths
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