First Nine Weeks Unit Test

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Questions: 25 | Attempts: 97

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First Nine Weeks Unit Test - Quiz


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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Identify if the statement is a true or false example of the type of conflict. Man vs. Self :     William felt guilty for locking Margot in the closet.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    This statement is a true example of the type of conflict known as Man vs. Self. The conflict arises from William's internal struggle and guilt over his actions of locking Margot in the closet. This conflict represents the inner turmoil and moral dilemma that William is experiencing within himself.

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  • 2. 

    Identify if the statement is a true or false example of the type of conflict. Man vs. Man :    Gary Soto sits depressingly in the alleyway because he does not like his jacket.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    The statement is false because it does not accurately represent the type of conflict. Man vs. Man conflict refers to a conflict between two or more characters, where their goals, beliefs, or actions clash with each other. In the given statement, Gary Soto sitting depressingly in the alleyway because he does not like his jacket does not involve a conflict between two or more individuals. It is more likely an internal conflict or a Man vs. Self conflict, where Gary is struggling with his own emotions or thoughts about his jacket.

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  • 3. 

    Identify if the statement is a true or false example of the type of conflict. Man vs. Society:    Rachel does not like Sylvia Saldavar’s input on the sweater.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    This statement is a false example of the type of conflict "Man vs. Society." The conflict "Man vs. Society" typically refers to a situation where an individual's beliefs, values, or actions are in conflict with the norms, rules, or expectations of society as a whole. In this case, Rachel not liking Sylvia Saldavar's input on a sweater does not involve a conflict between Rachel and society, but rather a conflict between Rachel and Sylvia as individuals.

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  • 4. 

    Identify if the statement is a true or false example of the type of conflict. Man vs. Nature:    The school children had to stand under heating lamps because there was a lack of sun exposure

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The statement is a true example of the type of conflict known as Man vs. Nature. In this case, the conflict arises from the school children having to rely on artificial heating lamps due to a lack of natural sun exposure. This conflict highlights the struggle between human beings and the forces of nature, as the children are dependent on external sources to compensate for the absence of sunlight.

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  • 5. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. PART OF THE EXPOSITION OF THIS STORY IS:

    • A.

      Bear Cage

    • B.

      Glen Campbell

    • C.

      Miller Farm

    • D.

      Circus for boars

    Correct Answer
    C. Miller Farm
    Explanation
    The correct answer is Miller Farm. In the story, it is mentioned that the wild boar is in the woods over by the Miller farm. This establishes the setting and introduces the central conflict of the story, which is the presence of the boar near the Miller farm. The Miller farm is an important element in the exposition of the story as it sets the stage for the events that unfold.

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  • 6. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. The rising action in the Boar Out There is in__________________.  (the numbers on the left indicate the paragraphs)

    • A.

      Paragraph 1

    • B.

      Paragraph 2

    • C.

      Paragraph 5

    • D.

      Paragraph 19

    Correct Answer
    C. Paragraph 5
    Explanation
    The rising action in a story refers to the events that build suspense and tension leading up to the climax. In paragraph 5, the protagonist, Jenny, decides to go find the boar in the woods, which creates anticipation and sets the stage for further developments in the story. This action propels the plot forward and increases the reader's interest in what will happen next.

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  • 7. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. “Jenny’s ears tingle and she listens for thick breathing” helps to build suspense?

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    The statement "Jenny's ears tingle and she listens for thick breathing" helps to build suspense because it suggests that Jenny is on high alert and anticipating something dangerous or thrilling. The mention of her ears tingling indicates heightened sensory perception, and the focus on listening for thick breathing implies that she is expecting the presence of the wild boar. This creates a sense of tension and anticipation, contributing to the building suspense in the story.

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  • 8. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. In paragraph 12, when he (the boar) came through the trees, and she had no time to scream is the _____________________ of the story.

    • A.

      Exposition

    • B.

      Climax

    • C.

      Falling Action

    • D.

      Resolution

    Correct Answer
    B. Climax
    Explanation
    The climax of the story is when the boar suddenly appears before Jenny, and she is unable to scream or run. This is the most intense and pivotal moment in the story, as it represents the culmination of Jenny's search for the boar and the moment of highest tension.

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  • 9. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. “The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts.”  This is an example of a compound sentence.

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    B. False
    Explanation
    This statement is false because it is not an example of a compound sentence. A compound sentence is a sentence that consists of two or more independent clauses joined together by a coordinating conjunction or a semicolon. The given sentence is a simple sentence that contains only one independent clause.

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  • 10. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. “When the blue jay yelled, and Jenny stood like a rock as the boar flung his head and bolted past her” is the ______________________ of the story?

    • A.

      Exposition

    • B.

      Plot

    • C.

      Falling Action

    • D.

      Resolution

    Correct Answer
    C. Falling Action
    Explanation
    The falling action of a story refers to the events that occur after the climax and lead to the resolution. In this case, the blue jay's yell and the boar's reaction to it signify the climax of the story. After this intense moment, the boar quickly flees past Jenny, which represents the falling action. It shows the immediate aftermath of the climax and sets the stage for the resolution of the story.

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  • 11. 

    Boar Out There Short story by Cynthia Rylant   1          Everyone in Glen Morgan knew there was a wild boar in the woods over by the Miller farm.  The boar was out beyond the splintery rail fence and past the old black Dodge that somehow had ended up in the woods and was missing most of its parts. 2          Jenny would hook her chin over the top rail of the fence, twirl a long green blade of grass in her teeth and whisper, “Boar out there.” 3          And there were times she was sure she heard him.  She imagined him running heavily through the trees, ignoring the sharp thorns and briars that raked his back and sprang away trembling. 4          She thought he might have a golden horn on his terrible head.  The boar would run deep into the woods, then rise up on his rear hooves, throw his head toward the stars and cry a long, clear, sure note into the air.  The note would glide through the night and spear the heart of the moon.  The boar had no fear of the moon, Jenny knew, as she lay in bed, listening. 5          One hot summer day she went to find the boar.  No one in Glen Morgan had ever gone past the old black Dodge and beyond, as far as she knew.  But the boar was there somewhere, between those awful trees, and his dark green eyes waited for someone. 6          Jenny felt it was she. 7          Moving slowly over damp brown leaves, Jenny could sense her ears tingle and fan out as she listened for thick breathing from the trees.  She stopped to pick a teaberry leaf to chew, stood a minute, then went on. 8          Deep in the woods she kept her eyes to the sky.  She needed to be reminded that there was a world above and apart from the trees - a world of space and air, air that didn’t linger all about her, didn’t press deep into her skin, as forest air did. 9          Finally, leaning against a tree to rest, she heard him for the first time.  She forgot to breathe, standing there listening to the stamping of hooves, and she choked and coughed. 10        Coughed! 11        And now the pounding was horrible, too loud and confusing for Jenny.  Horrible.  She stood stiff with wet eyes and knew she could always pray, but for some reason didn’t. 12        He came through the trees so fast that she had no time to scream or run.  And he was there before her. 13        His large gray-black body shivered as he waited just beyond the shadow of the tree she held for support.  His nostrils glistened, and his eyes; but astonishingly, he was silent.  He shivered and glistened and was absolutely silent. 14        Jenny matched his silence, and her body was rigid, but not her eyes.  They traveled along his scarred, bristling back to his thick hind legs.  Tears spilling and flooding her face, Jenny stared at the boar’s ragged ears, caked with blood.  Her tears dropped to the leaves, and the only sound between them was his slow breathing. 15        Then the boar snorted and jerked.  But Jenny did not move. 16        High in the trees a bluejay yelled, and, suddenly, it was over.  Jenny stood like a rock as the boar wildly flung his head and in terror bolted past her.  17        Past her…. 18        And now, since that summer, Jenny still hooks her chin over the old rail fence, and she still whispers, “Boar out there.”  But when she leans on the fence, looking into the trees, her eyes are full and she leaves wet patches on the splintery wood.  She is sorry for the torn ears of the boar and sorry that he has no golden horn. 19        But mostly she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, when everyone in Glen Morgan lives in fear of him. At the end of the story, how did Jenny feel about the boar?    

    • A.

      She pitied him.

    • B.

      She was afraid of him.

    • C.

      She was happy he got away.

    • D.

      She wishes he would come back.

    Correct Answer
    A. She pitied him.
    Explanation
    In the end of the story, Jenny feels pity for the boar. This is evident from the description of her tears spilling and flooding her face as she stares at the boar's ragged ears, caked with blood. Her tears and the wet patches she leaves on the fence indicate her sympathy and remorse for the boar's suffering. Additionally, the last sentence suggests that she is sorry that he lives in fear of bluejays and little girls, implying her empathy towards the boar's fearful existence.

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  • 12. 

    LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam Read the following poem and answer the question at the bottom.   LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam             Like bookends             my father at one side             my mother at the other               propping me up 5          but unable to read             what I feel.               Were they born with clothes on?             Born with rules on?               When we sit at the dinner table 10         we smooth our napkins into polite folds.             How was your day dear                                  Fine             And how was your dear                                  Fine 15         And how was school                               The same               Only once in a while             when we’re not trying so hard             when we’re not trying at all 20        our napkins suddenly whirl away             and we float up to the ceiling             where we sing and dance until it hurts from laughing               and then we float down             with our napkin parachutes 25        and once again spoon our soup             and pass the bread please. The simile in this poem compares what two things?

    • A.

      Clothes and rules

    • B.

      Bookends and parents

    • C.

      Dinner and rules

    • D.

      Bookends and dinner

    Correct Answer
    B. Bookends and parents
    Explanation
    The simile in this poem compares bookends to parents. The speaker describes their parents as being like bookends, with the father on one side and the mother on the other, propping them up. This comparison suggests that the parents provide support and stability in the speaker's life, much like bookends hold up books.

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  • 13. 

    Read the following poem and answer the question at the bottom.   LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam             Like bookends             my father at one side             my mother at the other               propping me up 5          but unable to read             what I feel.               Were they born with clothes on?             Born with rules on?               When we sit at the dinner table 10         we smooth our napkins into polite folds.             How was your day dear                                  Fine             And how was your dear                                  Fine 15         And how was school                               The same               Only once in a while             when we’re not trying so hard             when we’re not trying at all 20        our napkins suddenly whirl away             and we float up to the ceiling             where we sing and dance until it hurts from laughing               and then we float down             with our napkin parachutes 25        and once again spoon our soup             and pass the bread please. Which is an example of a vivid verb?

    • A.

      Read

    • B.

      Born

    • C.

      Smooth

    • D.

      Whirl

    Correct Answer
    D. Whirl
    Explanation
    The word "whirl" is an example of a vivid verb because it creates a strong visual image of the napkins suddenly spinning and moving rapidly. It adds action and excitement to the scene described in the poem.

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  • 14. 

    Read the following poem and answer the question at the bottom.   LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam             Like bookends             my father at one side             my mother at the other               propping me up 5          but unable to read             what I feel.               Were they born with clothes on?             Born with rules on?               When we sit at the dinner table 10         we smooth our napkins into polite folds.             How was your day dear                                  Fine             And how was your dear                                  Fine 15         And how was school                               The same               Only once in a while             when we’re not trying so hard             when we’re not trying at all 20        our napkins suddenly whirl away             and we float up to the ceiling             where we sing and dance until it hurts from laughing               and then we float down             with our napkin parachutes 25        and once again spoon our soup             and pass the bread please. Which is an example of a metaphor?

    • A.

      “propping me up”

    • B.

      “pass the bread please”

    • C.

      “like bookends”

    • D.

      “our napkin parachutes”

    Correct Answer
    D. “our napkin parachutes”
    Explanation
    The phrase "our napkin parachutes" is an example of a metaphor because it is comparing the napkins to parachutes, suggesting that they allow the speaker and their family to float and have a joyful experience during their meal.

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  • 15. 

    Read the following poem and answer the question at the bottom.   LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam             Like bookends             my father at one side             my mother at the other               propping me up 5          but unable to read             what I feel.               Were they born with clothes on?             Born with rules on?               When we sit at the dinner table 10         we smooth our napkins into polite folds.             How was your day dear                                  Fine             And how was your dear                                  Fine 15         And how was school                               The same               Only once in a while             when we’re not trying so hard             when we’re not trying at all 20        our napkins suddenly whirl away             and we float up to the ceiling             where we sing and dance until it hurts from laughing               and then we float down             with our napkin parachutes 25        and once again spoon our soup             and pass the bread please. Which thematic topic best relates to this poem?

    • A.

      Family

    • B.

      School

    • C.

      Reading

    • D.

      Dinner

    Correct Answer
    A. Family
    Explanation
    The thematic topic that best relates to this poem is family. The poem talks about the narrator's parents, their presence in the narrator's life, and their inability to understand the narrator's emotions. The mention of sitting at the dinner table and the interaction between family members also reinforces the theme of family.

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  • 16. 

    Read the following poem and answer the question at the bottom.   LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam             Like bookends             my father at one side             my mother at the other               propping me up 5          but unable to read             what I feel.               Were they born with clothes on?             Born with rules on?               When we sit at the dinner table 10         we smooth our napkins into polite folds.             How was your day dear                                  Fine             And how was your dear                                  Fine 15         And how was school                               The same               Only once in a while             when we’re not trying so hard             when we’re not trying at all 20        our napkins suddenly whirl away             and we float up to the ceiling             where we sing and dance until it hurts from laughing               and then we float down             with our napkin parachutes 25        and once again spoon our soup             and pass the bread please. How would you correct the following sentence?: “How was your day, dear”?  

    • A.

      “How was your day, dear”.

    • B.

      “How was your day, dear.”

    • C.

      “How was your day, dear?”

    • D.

      No changes need to be made.

    Correct Answer
    C. “How was your day, dear?”
    Explanation
    The correct sentence is "How was your day, dear?" because it includes the appropriate punctuation at the end of the sentence, which is a question mark. This punctuation indicates that the speaker is asking a question.

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  • 17. 

    Read the following poem and answer the question at the bottom.   LIKE BOOKENDS Poem by Eve Merriam             Like bookends             my father at one side             my mother at the other               propping me up 5          but unable to read             what I feel.               Were they born with clothes on?             Born with rules on?               When we sit at the dinner table 10         we smooth our napkins into polite folds.             How was your day dear                                  Fine             And how was your dear                                  Fine 15         And how was school                               The same               Only once in a while             when we’re not trying so hard             when we’re not trying at all 20        our napkins suddenly whirl away             and we float up to the ceiling             where we sing and dance until it hurts from laughing               and then we float down             with our napkin parachutes 25        and once again spoon our soup             and pass the bread please. How would you correct the following sentence?: “The same,” I said.  

    • A.

      “The same” I said.

    • B.

      “The same, I said.”

    • C.

      “The same.” I said.

    • D.

      No changes need to be made.

    Correct Answer
    D. No changes need to be made.
  • 18. 

    Identify which sentence is best written.

    • A.

      I live in Humble and I work in Houston.

    • B.

      I live in Humble, so I work in Houston.

    • C.

      I live in Humble; work in Houston.

    • D.

      I live in Humble, but I work in Houston.

    Correct Answer
    D. I live in Humble, but I work in Houston.
    Explanation
    The sentence "I live in Humble, but I work in Houston." is the best written because it effectively uses the conjunction "but" to show a contrast between living in Humble and working in Houston. This construction helps to convey a clear and concise message to the reader.

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  • 19. 

    Identify which sentence is best written.

    • A.

      We played timberwood Middle school, and lost.

    • B.

      We played timberwood middle school, and we lost.

    • C.

      We played Timberwood Middle School, and we lost.

    • D.

      We played Timberwood Middle School; and we lost.

    Correct Answer
    C. We played Timberwood Middle School, and we lost.
    Explanation
    The best written sentence is "We played Timberwood Middle School, and we lost." This sentence follows proper capitalization rules by capitalizing the first letter of each word in the school's name. It also uses a comma to separate the two independent clauses in the sentence.

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  • 20. 

    Identify which sentence is best written.

    • A.

      Carmen likes to swim and bowl; she is exceptional at both.

    • B.

      Carmen likes to Swim and Bowl; she is exceptional at both.

    • C.

      Carmen likes to swim and bowl, she is exceptional at both.

    • D.

      Carmen like to Swim and Bowl, she is exceptional at both.

    Correct Answer
    A. Carmen likes to swim and bowl; she is exceptional at both.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Carmen likes to swim and bowl; she is exceptional at both." This sentence is best written because it uses proper capitalization and punctuation. The verbs "swim" and "bowl" are written in lowercase, as they should be, and the sentence is correctly punctuated with a semicolon separating the two clauses. Additionally, the pronoun "she" is used correctly to refer back to Carmen.

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  • 21. 

    Identify which sentence is best written.

    • A.

      I will play the game with you; if you'd like me to.

    • B.

      I will play the game with you, if you'd like me to.

    • C.

      I will play the game with you if you'd like me to.

    • D.

      I will play the game with you; and if you'd like me to.

    Correct Answer
    B. I will play the game with you, if you'd like me to.
    Explanation
    The best written sentence is "I will play the game with you, if you'd like me to." This sentence uses the correct punctuation and structure to convey the intended meaning. The comma is placed correctly before the conditional clause "if you'd like me to," indicating a pause in the sentence.

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  • 22. 

    Identify which sentence is best written.

    • A.

      "Let's go to lunch," my mom said.

    • B.

      "Let's go to lunch." my mom said.

    • C.

      Let's go to lunch, my mom said.

    • D.

      "Let's go to lunch, my mom said."

    Correct Answer
    A. "Let's go to lunch," my mom said.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Let's go to lunch," my mom said. This sentence is correctly punctuated with a comma before the closing quotation mark, as it separates the dialogue tag ("my mom said") from the spoken words ("Let's go to lunch"). This follows the standard convention for punctuating dialogue in English.

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  • 23. 

    Identify which sentence is best written.

    • A.

      I thought to myself how will I ever know the truth?

    • B.

      I thought to myself "How will I ever know the truth"?

    • C.

      I thought to myself "How will I ever know the truth?"

    • D.

      I thought to myself, "How will I ever know the truth?"

    Correct Answer
    D. I thought to myself, "How will I ever know the truth?"
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "I thought to myself, 'How will I ever know the truth?'" because it uses the correct punctuation for a direct quotation and includes the necessary comma to separate the introductory phrase.

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Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Dec 12, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Oct 19, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Kchannette
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