English Grammar Test: Expert Level! Trivia Quiz

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English Grammar Test: Expert Level! Trivia Quiz - Quiz


Are you prepared for this English Grammar Test? This quiz is for expert-level takers or if you want to be expert level. Regarding this quiz, you should have an eye for grammatically incorrect sentences, and you should know how to make them correct. You should also see the difference between different types of nouns. This quiz can teach you appropriate English grammar. Good luck to you.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Is this sentence RIGHT or WRONG? If it's wrong, correct it: Neither Nick nor I KNOW how to answer.

    • A.

      The sentence is RIGHT

    • B.

      Neither Nick nor I KNOWS...

    • C.

      Neither Nick or I KNOW....

    Correct Answer
    A. The sentence is RIGHT
    Explanation
    The given answer is correct because the original sentence is grammatically correct. The subject "Neither Nick nor I" is a compound subject, and the verb "know" agrees with this plural subject. Therefore, there is no need to change the verb form to "knows" or to change "or" to "nor" in the sentence.

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  • 2. 

    Which sentence(s) is (are) RIGHT? 1) Neither of my sisters are married. 2) The door opened and in came the doctor. 3) 15 heads of cattle. 4) He's such the most boring person of them all. 5) I usedn't to like opera, but now I love it a lot.

    • A.

      Only 3) is right

    • B.

      2) 3) 4)

    • C.

      All these sentences are RIGHT!

    • D.

      All these sentences are WRONG!

    • E.

      All these sentences are right, except 3)

    Correct Answer
    E. All these sentences are right, except 3)
    Explanation
    Sentence 3) "15 heads of cattle" is incorrect because the word "heads" should be singular, not plural. It should be "15 head of cattle" instead.

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  • 3. 

    Which sentence(s)  is (are) WRONG?1) I'm late, AREN'T I?2) So you're getting married, ARE YOU?3) Your mother is at home, IS SHE?4) This is the last bus, IS IT?5) This pen belongs to me, DOES HE?

    • A.

      All the sentences are WRONG!

    • B.

      All the sentences are wrong, except 1)

    • C.

      All the sentences are right, except 5)

    Correct Answer
    C. All the sentences are right, except 5)
  • 4. 

    Do these two sentences mean the same?1) How you've grown!2) Haven't you grown!

    • A.

      No, they have different meanings

    • B.

      Yes, they mean the same.

    • C.

      The second one is WRONG.

    Correct Answer
    B. Yes, they mean the same.
    Explanation
    The two sentences "How you've grown!" and "Haven't you grown!" have the same meaning. Both sentences express surprise or admiration at someone's growth or development. The first sentence is a statement while the second sentence is a question with a negative tag. However, both sentences convey the same message and can be used interchangeably to express the same sentiment.

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  • 5. 

    Is this sentence right or wrong? If it's wrong, correct it:I'd like to really understand philosophy.

    • A.

      I'd like really to...

    • B.

      I'd really like to...

    • C.

      The sentence is right

    Correct Answer
    C. The sentence is right
    Explanation
    The given sentence "I'd like to really understand philosophy" is incorrect. The correct version of the sentence is "I'd really like to understand philosophy." The placement of the adverb "really" should be before the verb "like" to modify the intensity of the desire, not before the infinitive verb "to understand."

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  • 6. 

    Is this sentence right or wrong? If it's wrong, correct it:They are asking for $500 a month rent.

    • A.

      The sentence is RIGHT

    • B.

      They are asking about...

    • C.

      They are asking $500...

    Correct Answer
    C. They are asking $500...
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "They are asking $500..." because the original sentence is grammatically correct and does not require any correction. It accurately conveys that someone is requesting a monthly rent of $500.

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  • 7. 

    Is this sentence right or wrong? If it's wrong, correct it:What kind of person are you?

    • A.

      The sentence is RIGHT

    • B.

      What kind of a person...

    • C.

      What kind of the person...

    Correct Answer
    A. The sentence is RIGHT
    Explanation
    The given sentence "What kind of person are you?" is grammatically correct. It is a question asking about the type or category of person someone is. The alternatives provided ("What kind of a person..." and "What kind of the person...") are incorrect because they use incorrect articles. The correct article to use in this context is "of" without any additional articles.

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  • 8. 

    Which sentence(s) is (are) right?1) According to me, her boyfriend is an idiot.2) He arrives at New York City. 3) You look younger on this photo.

    • A.

      None of them are RIGHT

    • B.

      Only 2) and 3) are RIGHT

    • C.

      All of them are RIGHT

    Correct Answer
    A. None of them are RIGHT
    Explanation
    1) In my opinion, her boyfriend is an idiot. (not: According to me)
    2)He arrives IN New York City. (note: arrive IN big cities, but arrive AT little towns, airports, and other not that big places)
    3) You look younger IN this photo. (note: in a photo, in a picture)

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  • 9. 

    Do these two sentences mean the same? 1) It is a nice evening. 2) It looks like a nice evening.

    • A.

      2) has a different meaning

    • B.

      Yes, they mean the same.

    • C.

      1) is WRONG

    Correct Answer
    B. Yes, they mean the same.
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "Yes, they mean the same." Both sentences convey the same meaning, which is that the evening appears to be nice. The only difference is the inclusion of the word "like" in the second sentence, which is optional and does not change the overall meaning.

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  • 10. 

    Do these two sentences mean the same? 1) Do not invite them. 2) Let's not invite them.

    • A.

      Yes, they mean mean the same.

    • B.

      The first sentence is wrong

    Correct Answer
    A. Yes, they mean mean the same.
    Explanation
    The two sentences have the same meaning. Both sentences express the idea of not inviting someone. The first sentence uses the contraction "don't" to indicate the negative form of "let us," while the second sentence uses the phrase "let's not." Despite the difference in wording, both sentences convey the same message. The statement "The first sentence is wrong" is incorrect because both sentences are grammatically correct and have the same meaning.

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  • 11. 

    Do these two sentences mean the same?1) Have you got to go?2) Do you have to go?

    • A.

      Yes, they mean the same.

    • B.

      1) has a different meaning

    Correct Answer
    A. Yes, they mean the same.
    Explanation
    The two sentences "Have you got to go?" and "Do you have to go?" have the same meaning. Both sentences are asking if the person needs to leave or if they are obligated to go somewhere. The phrase "have got to" is often used as a synonym for "have to" in informal English. Therefore, both sentences are asking about the necessity or obligation to leave.

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  • 12. 

    Can these two sentences mean the same?1) They can't be home2) They must not be home.

    • A.

      2) is more common in AMERICAN ENGLISH but it means the same as the BRITISH variant - 1)

    • B.

      These two sentences have different meanings.

    • C.

      2) is more common in GB English but it can mean the same as the American variant - 1)

    Correct Answer
    A. 2) is more common in AMERICAN ENGLISH but it means the same as the BRITISH variant - 1)
    Explanation
    Sentence 1) "They can't be home" implies that it is not possible for them to be at home, while sentence 2) "They must not be home" suggests that it is necessary for them not to be at home. However, despite the difference in meaning, sentence 2) is more commonly used in American English, but it can convey the same meaning as sentence 1) in British English.

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  • 13. 

    Which of these sentences is an American variant?1) The audience was/were enjoying the show. 2) The audience was enjoying the show.

    • A.

      1)

    • B.

      2)

    Correct Answer
    B. 2)
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 2) The audience was enjoying the show. This is the American variant because in American English, collective nouns like "audience" are usually treated as singular, while in British English, they can be treated as either singular or plural.

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  • 14. 

    Which of these sentences is an American variant?1) Is that Becky?2) Is this Becky?

    • A.

      1)

    • B.

      2)

    Correct Answer
    B. 2)
    Explanation
    Sentence 2, "Is this Becky?" is an American variant because in American English, it is common to use "this" when referring to a person or object that is close to the speaker. In this case, the speaker is likely referring to Becky who is either physically present or being pointed to. Sentence 1, "Is that Becky?" is more commonly used in British English, where "that" is used to refer to a person or object that is further away from the speaker.

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  • 15. 

    Which of these sentences is an American variant? 1) Someone was coming towards us.2) Someone was coming toward us.

    • A.

      1)

    • B.

      2)

    Correct Answer
    B. 2)
    Explanation
    The correct answer is 2) Someone was coming toward us. In American English, the word "toward" is commonly used, while in British English, "towards" is more commonly used. Therefore, sentence 2 is the American variant as it uses "toward" instead of "towards".

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  • 16. 

    What is the difference between these two nouns?1) ax2) axe

    • A.

      1) is an American variant of 2)

    • B.

      1) doesn't exist

    Correct Answer
    A. 1) is an American variant of 2)
    Explanation
    The difference between "ax" and "axe" is that "ax" is an American variant of "axe". This means that "ax" is the American spelling of the word, while "axe" is the British spelling. Both words refer to the same tool, a chopping tool with a bladed head and a handle, but the spelling differs based on the region in which it is used.

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