Social Studies And Arts! Trivia Questions Quiz

49 Questions | Total Attempts: 33

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Social Studies And Arts! Trivia Questions Quiz

The trivia questions quiz is on Social Studies and Arts! There is an interconnection of social studies and art, and this is because art has been a way to tell stories of the past in different ways. In this quiz, you will get to test your social studies and art knowledge. Think you know enough to get all the questions, right? Do give it a shot!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    _______________, along with many other classical Greek thinkers, believed that the appropriateness of any particular form of knowledge depends on the telos, or purpose, it serves
  • 2. 
    "The purpose of a theoretical discipline is the pursuit of truth through contemplation; its telos is the attainment of knowledge for its own sake."
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      Aristotle

    • D. 

      Plato

    • E. 

      John Dewey

  • 3. 
    The form of thinking appropriate to theoretical activities, according to Aristotle, was ___________________
    • A. 

      Superficial

    • B. 

      Divergent

    • C. 

      Convergent

    • D. 

      Contemplative

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 4. 
    According toi Mark K. Smith, _____________________thinking involves mulling over facts and ideas that the person already possesses.  
    • A. 

      Divergent

    • B. 

      Convergent

    • C. 

      Creative

    • D. 

      Contemplative

    • E. 

      Speculative

  • 5. 
    For aristotle, the _______________ is one who has already acquired knowledge; and what s/he is contemplating is precisely this knowledge already present in his/her mind...
    • A. 

      Meditator

    • B. 

      Contemplator

    • C. 

      Logician

    • D. 

      Speculator

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 6. 
    The role of the educators (according to aristotle) is to help people to gain the knowledge on which they are to reflect; to train them in the disciplines of contemplation, and to develop their character so that they became disposed to this form of activity.
    • A. 

      John Dewey

    • B. 

      William H. Kilpatrick

    • C. 

      Plato

    • D. 

      Aristotle

    • E. 

      William C. Bagley

  • 7. 
    The form of thinking appropriate to theoretical activities, according to Aristotle, was ________________.
    • A. 

      Poietike

    • B. 

      Praxis

    • C. 

      Contemplative

  • 8. 
    According to Aristotle, the kind of knowledge and inquiry involved in productive disciplines was a 'making' action or _____________.
    • A. 

      Poietke

    • B. 

      Praxis

    • C. 

      Contemplative

  • 9. 
    Aristotle associated this form of thinking and doing with the work of craftspeople or artisans. 
    • A. 

      Poietke

    • B. 

      Praxis

    • C. 

      Contemplation

  • 10. 
    The form of reasoning associated with the practical sciences is ___________or informed and committed action.
    • A. 

      Poietke

    • B. 

      Praxis

    • C. 

      Contemplation

  • 11. 
    For Aristotle, __________is guided by a moral disposition to act truly and rightly; a concern to further human well being and the good life. 
    • A. 

      Poietke

    • B. 

      Praxis

    • C. 

      Contemplation

  • 12. 
    Though coming into prominence in the American progressive era, Charles Sanders Peirce is best described as a
    • A. 

      Progressive

    • B. 

      Pragmatist

    • C. 

      Humanist

    • D. 

      Social efficiency advocate

    • E. 

      Social meliorist

  • 13. 
    Though an early proponent of the progressive education movement of John Dewey, This educational theoristbecame its leading critic affiliated with the school of Social Reconstructionism in education. 
    • A. 

      Col. Francis M. Parker

    • B. 

      Augustus Comte

    • C. 

      William Heard Kilpatrick

    • D. 

      George S. Counts

    • E. 

      William C. Bagley

  • 14. 
    Who is this?
  • 15. 
    John Dewey once referred to _____________as the "father of progressive education," and in fact, Dewey chose to send his own children to the school Parker started.
    • A. 

      William Heard Kilpatrick

    • B. 

      Francis W. Parker

    • C. 

      William C. Bagley

    • D. 

      George S. Counts

  • 16. 
    Is best described as
    • A. 

      Humanist educator

    • B. 

      Progressive educator

    • C. 

      Social efficiency educatior

    • D. 

      Social meliorist

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 17. 
    Is best described as a
    • A. 

      Humanist educator

    • B. 

      Progressive educator

    • C. 

      Social efficiency educator

    • D. 

      Social meliorist educator

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 18. 
     ______________made a number of important theoretical innovations that have had a considerable impact on the development of educational practice - and on informal education and popular education in particular
  • 19. 
    His emphasis on dialogue has struck a very strong chord with those concerned with popular and informal education. Too much education, he argues, involves 'banking' - the educator making 'deposits' in the educatee.
    • A. 

      John Goodlad

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      William Bagley

    • D. 

      Paolo Friere

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 20. 
    Action that is informed (and linked to certain values)
    • A. 

      Poietke

    • B. 

      Praxis

    • C. 

      Contemplation

  • 21. 
    The idea of building a 'pedagogy of the oppressed' or a 'pedagogy of hope' and how this may be carried forward has formed a significant impetus to work. An important element of this was his concern with conscientization - developing consciousness, but consciousness that is understood to have the power to transform reality' 
    • A. 

      John Goodlad

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      William Bagley

    • D. 

      Paolo Friere

    • E. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

  • 22. 
    He believed in situating educational activity in the lived experience of participants has opened up a series of possibilities for the way informal educators can approach practice. His concern to look for words that have the possibility of generating new ways of naming and acting in the world when working with people around literacies.
    • A. 

      John Goodlad

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      William C. Bagly

    • D. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • E. 

      Paolo Friere

  • 23. 
    Who is this?
  • 24. 
    Who is this?
  • 25. 
    The philospher, George Herbert Mead is best described as
    • A. 

      Humanist educator

    • B. 

      Pragmatist

    • C. 

      Progressive educator

    • D. 

      Social Efficiency educator

    • E. 

      Social Meliorist educator

  • 26. 
    He developed a theory of curriculum development borrowed from the principles of scientific management, which the engineer Frederick Winslow Taylor had articulated earlier in the century in his efforts to render American industry more efficient.  
  • 27. 
    The key principal for___________was the task idea, the notion that each worker should be given a narrowly defined production assignment that he was to perform at a specific rate using certain predefined procedures.   
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • C. 

      Hilda Taba

    • D. 

      Frederick Winslow Tayler

  • 28. 
    His procedures for curriculum planning, which he referred to as job analysis, were adapted from (Federick Winslow)Taylor's work and began with the identification of the specific activities that adults undertook in fulfilling their various occupational, citizenship, family, and other social roles.  
    • A. 

      Ralph W. Tyler

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • D. 

      Harold Rugg

    • E. 

      John I Goodlad

  • 29. 
    Franklin Bobbitt, Ralph W. Tyler, W. W. Charters, Ross L. Finney, Charles C. Peters, and David Snedden can best be described as
    • A. 

      Humanists educators

    • B. 

      Progressive educators

    • C. 

      Social Efficiency educators

    • D. 

      Social Meliorist educators

  • 30. 
    The school, for these educators, was a key institution in dealing with the disruptions and dislocations in American life that they associated with the nation's late-nineteenth-and early-twentieth-century transformation into an urban, industrial society. The purpose of education, they argued, was to prepare youth for the specific work and citizenship roles, which they would hold when they reached adulthood, and in so doing render society more orderly and stable. The test for the schools and its program, as these thinkers saw it, was its utility in fulfilling this social purpose.
    • A. 

      Humanist educators

    • B. 

      Progressive educators

    • C. 

      Social efficiency educators

    • D. 

      Social meliorist educators

  • 31. 
    He was one of the first American educators to advance the case for the identification of objectives as the starting point for curriculum making.
    • A. 

      Franklin Bobbitt

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      Paolo Friere

    • D. 

      John I. Goodlad

  • 32. 
    Albion Small, George S. Counts, Boyd H. Bode and Harold O. Rugg were among the loudest voices advocating for the curriculum to a means or vehicle for social reconstruction. These philosopher/educators can best be described as
    • A. 

      Humanist educators

    • B. 

      Progressive educators

    • C. 

      Social efficiency educators

    • D. 

      Social meliorist educators

    • E. 

      None of these

  • 33. 
    Who is this?
  • 34. 
    Founded the first Department of Sociology in the United States at the University of Chicago in 1892. He was influential in the establishment of sociology as a valid field of academic study. He was also the teacher of and a major influence on George S. Counts.
  • 35. 
    assembled a team to create his Social Science Pamphlets, a series of Booklets that comprised the social studies materials for junior high school (grades six to eight). These materials were adapted and published by Ginn and Company starting in 1929. Over the course of the next fifteen years, his publishing company would sell over 5 million textbooks, and the pattern of creating textbook series became a model in publishing still used in the early twenty-first century. He was an ardent social reconstructionist and was accused of being anti-American because of his socialist leanings.
  • 36. 
    These educators suggested that it was anti-democratic and elitist and aristocratic to expect all students to be able to participate in the academic curriculum [suggesting that] immigrant children needed a different kind of education from native children,"
    • A. 

      Humanist educators

    • B. 

      Progressive educators

    • C. 

      Social efficiency educators

    • D. 

      Social meliorist educators

  • 37. 
    The fundamental belief of the ______________ was to transfer academic skills to other venues, primarily the workforce. The main objective of this movement was to industrialize the curriculum to fit the business industry.
    • A. 

      Humanist/Mental discipline movement

    • B. 

      Social Efficiency Movement

    • C. 

      Social Meliorist Movement

    • D. 

      Progressive movement

  • 38. 
    ___________________traditionally has been regarded as a remedy for misbehavior and poverty. As the population of immigrants increased this approach to education was used to help assimilate newcomers to the dominant culture of the nation.
    • A. 

      Humanist/Mental Discipline education

    • B. 

      Social Efficiency education

    • C. 

      Social Meliorist education

    • D. 

      Vocational /Manual Arts education

  • 39. 
    _______________________ was one of the founding members of the American Anti-Slavery Society, remaining with the Society from 1833 to 1840. In 1840, he left the American Anti-Slavery Society to join the newly formed American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society largely over disputes with William Lloyd Garrison over religion in the Abolitionist movement. He used his position as a journalist and editor to inform the public on the issues involving Abolitionism. He was deeply involved in creating manual arts high schools and colleges for African Americans
    • A. 

      Samuel Cornish

    • B. 

      Booker T. Washington

    • C. 

      George Washington Carver

    • D. 

      Samuel Chapman Armstrong

  • 40. 
    He established the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute—now known as Hampton University—in Hampton Virginia in 1868. The Institute was meant to be a place where black students could receive post-secondary education to become teachers, as well as training in useful job skills while paying for their education through manual labor.
    • A. 

      Samuel Cornish

    • B. 

      Samuel Chapman Armstrong

    • C. 

      George Washington Carver

    • D. 

      Booker T. Washington

  • 41. 
    was an American academic and philosopher notable for his work on philosophy of education. He has been associated with both the progressive and social reconstructionist schools of thought.
  • 42. 
    Was an American political leader, educator, orator and author. He was the dominant figure in th African American community in the United States from 1890 to 1915. As an educator, he is best described as a
    • A. 

      Humanist/Mental discipline educator

    • B. 

      Progressive educator

    • C. 

      Social efficiency educator

    • D. 

      Social meliorist educator

    • E. 

      Vocational/Manual arts educator

  • 43. 
    Created a rationale consisting of four questions that carried his name1.What educational purposes should the school seek to attain?2.What educational experiences can be provided that are likely to attain these purposes?3.How can these educational experiences be effectively organized?4. How can we determinine whether these purposes are being attained.
  • 44. 
    His concept of seminars on "great books" and "great ideas" continued to become integrated into programs in several leading educational institutions. In 1952, his work in this area culminated in the publication of the "Great Books of the Western World" by the Enclyclopedia Britannica company.
    • A. 

      John Dewey

    • B. 

      Mortimer Adler

    • C. 

      Robert M. Hutchins

    • D. 

      George S. Counts

  • 45. 
    Paideia is a focus on the art of teaching and what happens in the classroom for all students; it is not a plug-in program. Paideia requires teachers to use three different teaching modes to convey significant ideas, skills and facts within the curriculum. Paideia was developed by __________________ and the Paideia Group, Inc.
    • A. 

      Robert M. Hutchins

    • B. 

      John Dewey

    • C. 

      George S. Counts

    • D. 

      William Chandler Bagley

    • E. 

      Mortimer Adler

  • 46. 
    Mortimer Adler's Paideia program, focusing on the lecture, coaching and the seminar is steeped in the classical education philosophy called
    • A. 

      Essentialism

    • B. 

      Perennialism

    • C. 

      Progressivism

    • D. 

      Social reconstructionism/critical theory

    • E. 

      Humanism/existentialsm

  • 47. 
    Describing his Laboratory School, John Dewey said: "the basic principle necessarily demanded a very considerable break with the aims, methods, and materials familiar in the traditional school. It involved departure from the conception that, in the main, the proper materials and methods of education are already well-known and need only to be furthered, refined, and extended. It implied continual experimentation to discover the conditions under which educative growth actually occurs. It implied also much more attention to present conditions in the life of individuals, children, and contemporary society than was current in schools based chiefly upon the attainments of the past. It involved the substitution of an active attitude of work and play and of inquiry for the process of imposition and passive absorption of ready-made knowledge and preformed skills that largely dominated the traditional school. It implied a much larger degree of opportunity for initiative, discovery, and independent communication of intellectual freedom than was characteristic of the traditional school." The educational philosophy undergirding the Lab school was
    • A. 

      Essentialism

    • B. 

      Perennialism

    • C. 

      Progressivism

    • D. 

      Social reconstructionism/critical theory

    • E. 

      Humanism/Existentialism

  • 48. 
    Arthur Sutherland Neill's Summerhill school is an example of a school steeped in the ___________educational philosophy
    • A. 

      Essentialism

    • B. 

      Perennialism

    • C. 

      Progressivism

    • D. 

      Social reconstruction/Critical theory

    • E. 

      Humanism/Existentialism

  • 49. 
    Who is this?