Week 232 Dopamine (And Movement/Parkinsons Disease)

20 Questions | Total Attempts: 316

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Week 232 Dopamine (And Movement/Parkinsons Disease)

To link the neurobiology of dopamine to its roles in both health and disease states


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The dopamine-producing region of the brain which dies in Parkinsons disease is called the
    • A. 

      Amygdala

    • B. 

      Basal nucleus of Meynert

    • C. 

      Locus Coeruleus

    • D. 

      Raphe Nucleus

    • E. 

      Substantia Nigra

    • F. 

      Medical malpractice

    • G. 

      Depersonalization

    • H. 

      The Hippocratic oath

    • I. 

      Reverse psychology

    • J. 

      A vicious circle

  • 2. 
    Dopamine regulates movement principally through projections from the substantia nigra to the
    • A. 

      Dorsal Striatum

    • B. 

      Globus Pallidus

    • C. 

      Motor Cortex

    • D. 

      Subthalamic Nucleus

    • E. 

      Ventral Striatum

  • 3. 
    The striatum, globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nucleus are all part of the
    • A. 

      Basal Ganglia

    • B. 

      Brainstem

    • C. 

      Cranial nerves

    • D. 

      Hypothalamus

    • E. 

      Thalamus

  • 4. 
    The substantia nigra is so named, and clearly visible on brain sections, because it
    • A. 

      Is black

    • B. 

      Is located outside of the four major lobes and looks like a 'little brain'

    • C. 

      Is shaped like a seahorse

    • D. 

      Is the major white matter structure linking the two hemispheres

    • E. 

      Is very highly folded

  • 5. 
    Dopamine is broken down by
    • A. 

      Acetylcholinesterase

    • B. 

      Cyclooxygenase

    • C. 

      Dopa decarboxylase

    • D. 

      Dopaminase

    • E. 

      Monoamine oxidase

  • 6. 
    L-DOPA is converted into dopamine by
    • A. 

      Acetylcholinesterase

    • B. 

      Cyclooxygenase

    • C. 

      Dopa decarboxylase

    • D. 

      Dopaminase

    • E. 

      Monoamine oxidase

  • 7. 
    Patients with Parkinsons disease suffer from a lack of dopamine
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    Carbidopa is a
    • A. 

      Dopa decarboxylase inhibitor

    • B. 

      Dopamine receptor agonist

    • C. 

      Dopamine reuptake inhibitor

    • D. 

      Monoamine oxidase inhibitor

    • E. 

      Stimulator of dopamine release

  • 9. 
    A dopa decaroxylase inhibitor (such as Carbidopa), which inhibits the conversion of L-DOPA into dopamine, should not be given to patients with Parkinsons disease
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    Selegiline is a
    • A. 

      Dopa decarboxylase inhibitor

    • B. 

      Dopamine receptor agonist

    • C. 

      Dopamine reuptake inhibitor

    • D. 

      Monoamine oxidase inhibitor

    • E. 

      Stimulator of dopamine release

  • 11. 
    Entacapone is a
    • A. 

      Dopa decarboxylase agonist

    • B. 

      Catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitor

    • C. 

      Dopamine receptor antagonist

    • D. 

      Monoamine oxidase agonist

    • E. 

      Stimulator of dopamine breakdown

    • F. 

      Cruelty

    • G. 

      Assiduity

    • H. 

      Determination

    • I. 

      Delusions of grandeur

    • J. 

      Work ethic

  • 12. 
    Ropinirole is a
    • A. 

      Dopa decarboxylase inhibitor

    • B. 

      Dopamine receptor agonist

    • C. 

      Dopamine reuptake inhibitor

    • D. 

      Monoamine oxidase inhibitor

    • E. 

      Stimulator of dopamine release

  • 13. 
    Pramipexole is a
    • A. 

      Dopa decarboxylase inhibitor

    • B. 

      Dopamine receptor agonist

    • C. 

      Dopamine reuptake inhibitor

    • D. 

      Monoamine oxidase inhibitor

    • E. 

      Stimulator of dopamine release

  • 14. 
    Possible side effects of dopamine agonists such as ropinirole and prampipexole include (tick all that apply)
    • A. 

      Constipation

    • B. 

      Hallucinations

    • C. 

      Hypersexuality

    • D. 

      Nausea

    • E. 

      Pathological gambling

  • 15. 
    Metoclopramide is primarily used as an
    • A. 

      Anticoagulant

    • B. 

      Antidepressant

    • C. 

      Antiemetic

    • D. 

      Antihistamine

    • E. 

      Antipsychotic

  • 16. 
    Haloperidol is primarily used as an
    • A. 

      Anticoagulant

    • B. 

      Antidepressant

    • C. 

      Antiemetic

    • D. 

      Antihistamine

    • E. 

      Antipsychotic

    • F. 

      A spiritual awakening

    • G. 

      Crippling remorse

    • H. 

      Mixed emotions

    • I. 

      False dilemm

    • J. 

      Homesickness

  • 17. 
    The use of haloperidol and metoclopramide in Parkinsons disease is potentially problematic because they
    • A. 

      Block dopamine receptors

    • B. 

      Block dopamine reuptake

    • C. 

      Block dopamine synthesis

    • D. 

      Stimulate dopamine receptors

    • E. 

      Stimulate dopamine breakdown

  • 18. 
    The clinical potency of 'typical' antipsychotics shows good correlation with their ability to
    • A. 

      Block dopamine release

    • B. 

      Block dopamine D1 receptors

    • C. 

      Block dopamine D2 receptors

    • D. 

      Stimulate dopamine breakdown

    • E. 

      Stimulate dopamine reuptake

  • 19. 
    Dyskinesia is best described as
    • A. 

      Awareness of position and movement

    • B. 

      Excessive, abnormal, random fidgety movements

    • C. 

      Rhythmic oscillatory movement

    • D. 

      Slow or sustained abnormal movement of limb

    • E. 

      Stereotyped brief movement

  • 20. 
    Dopamine hydrochloride administered via the intravenous route does not cross the blood-brain barrier
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

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