ReddIT - IT Career Path Quiz - No Longer Updated.

16 Questions | Total Attempts: 3235

ReddIT - IT Career Path Quiz - No Longer Updated. - Quiz

There are a number of careers that someone who has an interest in information technology. If you are undertaking a course in it is important to ensure that when you are done you get into a career that is just perfect for you. Need some help deciding? Take up this Reddit - IT Career Path Quiz - No Longer Updated.


You May Get

DBA/Architect

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Database technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on Databases, make sure it's mostly about Databases & Software, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Server etc.Job: Application Support Analyst (No, not the kind that you call up when you are having problems using iTunes or Windows) - App Support Analysts are usually 9-5 jobs and are tasked with maintaining and support applications that business uses (Not things like MS Office, outlook, skype etc.) but specialized applications like Trouble Ticketing Systems, Internally Coded Applications, Website Backend programs, Custom Software etc. etc. You will be able to dabble a little with servers, understand application architecture, business processes, and learn how to properly manage software delivery lifecycles.Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Oracle DBA, MCDBA etc. Focus on at least 2 different database vendors to increase your job marketability and compliment it with a certification that's relevant to it... eg. Oracle is usually run on Linux/Unix and VMWare, so get an introductory cert in those if you haven't already.Job: Database Administrator - DBAs manage databases. What does that mean? If an application needs to store unstructured data, you help setup and manage the platform that provides that service. You may be expected to help developers create queries so they can best extract that data in a easily digestible format. You will learn how to optimize queries and database structures so the data can be extracted at lightspeed.Senior career and training regimen should be:Training: Oracle DWCIS, Hadoop CDA, TOGAF By this point, you should have supplemented your basic certifications with more advanced and specialized ones pertaining to operations (hands-on) work to your area of expertise. But now is the time to move one level up.Job: Data Warehouse or Solution Architect - Data Warehouse Architects plan how to store, manipulate and present vast amounts of raw data captured by a business into a useful form that the business can use to generate revenue or intelligence. eg. Facebook obviously captures alot of data about your interests, where you've been, your friends etc etc. You need an architect to plan how you are going to store that data and send it in a form to advertisers can use to send it's audience relevant ads.Solution Architects are less knowledgeable about Cloud/Infrastructure than their architect counterparts but understand MORE about software and service delivery than them. You will be able to design business solutions using software to deliver services/products to the company/consumers. eg. You are working for Comcast and want to deliver IPTV to millions of TVs...how do you bill them? how do you add them as customers? You will be seriously making bank at this stage.

Devops/Architect

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Server technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on server, make sure it's mostly about Windows, Linux, VMWare, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Databases etc. But make sure at least 1 or 2 of the courses are PROGRAMMING ones.Job: Application Support Analyst (No, not the kind that you call up when you are having problems using iTunes or Windows) - App Support Analysts are usually 9-5 jobs and are tasked with maintaining and support applications that business uses (Not things like MS Office, outlook, skype etc.) but specialized applications like Trouble Ticketing Systems, Internally Coded Applications, Website Backend programs, Custom Software etc. etc. You will be able to dabble a little with servers, understand application architecture, business processes, and learn how to properly manage software delivery lifecycles.Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Based on whichever you found preferable above, you will take either RHCE or MSCE Certification in order to become wholly sufficient in setting up and managing advanced deployments of server technologies. You will supplement this with a basic programming certification such as node.js, java, C++ or whichever is the majority in the marketplace where you live. This, along with a certification in Docker, Chef, or Puppet etc etc. will enable you to have an understanding on how IT provides services to developers and vice versa.Job: Devops Administrator - Devops are sort of the orange-is-the-new black. They combine the technical operations knowledge/work of a system administrator with the programming knowledge of developers. Note, you do not to be an expert programming to be in devops, but at least have a solid understanding of coding concepts, software deployment cycles, and general code troubleshooting will help. Devops are generally paid better than regular system administrators and are usually business hours only.Senior career and training regimen should be:Training: AWS CDOE, TOGAF. By this point, you should have supplemented your basic certifications with more advanced and specialized ones pertaining to operations (hands-on) work to your area of expertise. But now is the time to move one level up.Job: Cloud or Solution Architect - Cloud or infrastructure Architects are the guys who understand infrastructure and have a solid education and work background dealing with all aspects of IT technology: Compute, Network, Storage and are able to design complete IT ecosystems/solutions to tackle today and tomorrow's business problems and solutions. You'll be making bank, especially if you work for one of the big companies or as an independent contractor.Solution Architects are less knowledgeable about Cloud/Infrastructure than their architect counterparts but understand MORE about software and service delivery than them. You will be able to design business solutions using software to deliver services/products to the company/consumers. eg. You are working for Comcast and want to deliver IPTV to millions of TVs...how do you bill them? how do you add them as customers? You will be seriously making bank at this stage.

Infrastructure Admin/Architect

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Server technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on server, make sure it's mostly about Windows, Linux, VMWare, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Databases etc.Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support.Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Based on whichever you found preferable above, you will take either RHCE or MSCE Certification in order to become wholly sufficient in setting up and managing advanced deployments of server technologies. You may supplement this with an even more specialized certification such as MCSD: Sharepoint or VCP depending on which technologies you've encountered during your employment that interests you.Job: System Administrator/Virtualization Administrator - System Administrators are the ones who are responsible for installing, configuring and maintaining the server infrastructure that you have learned about in Server+ and perhaps even done some of their less critical job functions as a SOC Analyst. Many support teams will come to you for when an application they installed on your server is not functioning, or when a server that is performing a critical function (like email) stops functioning. System Administrators are usually a 9-5 job but with the expectation to answer support calls 24/7 (May be paid/unpaid).Senior career and training regimen should be:Based on what you took above, more MCSE and MCSD or RH/VMWare Equivalents in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Microsoft or Redhat or Virtualization. You might not know everything about other areas (eg. Windows Active Directory) but you will be the absolute authority about your own area (eg. Sharepoint).Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results.

Network Admin/Architect

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+, CCNA: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Network technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on network, make sure it's mostly about WAN, Wireless, Firewalls, and only a few courses on Servers, Storage, Databases etc. CCNA provides you with vendor specific (Cisco) knowledge on the setup & operation of Routers/Switches and advanced networking theory on how to connect computers and LANs together over WAN.Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support. Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:  Training: CCNP, VCP6-NV: CCNP's allow you to learn more than just basic operation and setup that a CCNA provides. You will learn more complex setups and troubleshooting procedures and be able to setup, manage, maintain large scale deployments on a Enterprise or Telco scale. VCP6-NV allows you to expand out and understand how VMWare, world's largest and most common virtualization provider does network virtualization and to work with converged infrastructure (server & storage) and design and deploy accordingly.   Job: Network Administrator - Network Administrators are the ones in charge of setting up networks, supporting them, and some design work, but it's mostly operational (hands-on). Your time will be mostly spent troubleshooting problems with the network (Why is the link to office B so slow; Customers in City B aren't able to reach google.com; The link to City D is down and the backup link didn't kick in.) Senior career and training regimen should be:Training: CCIE, CCAr.  CCIE/CCAr's are the absolute authorities on cisco networking and have the skill to properly plan, implement, manage and maintain the most large and complex of networks. Job: Network/Infrastructure Architect - If Comcast tells you, "Hey, we need to provide Internet service to a city of a million people where we currently don't give any service to, make it happen." you don't bat an eye. Network Architects have a deep fundamental understanding of how networking works on a small and epic scale and can easily design network solutions to deliver services to just 1 or 1,000,000 end-users.infrastructure Architects are the guys who understand infrastructure and have a solid education and work background dealing with all aspects of IT technology: Compute, Network, Storage and are able to design complete IT ecosystems/solutions to tackle today and tomorrow's business problems and solutions. You'll be making bank, especially if you work for one of the big companies or as an independent contractor.  

Network/Infosec/Architect

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training: Server+, CCNA: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Network technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on network, make sure it's mostly about WAN, Wireless, Firewalls, and only a few courses on Servers, Storage, Databases etc. CCNA provides you with vendor specific (Cisco) knowledge on the setup & operation of Routers/Switches and advanced networking theory on how to connect computers and LANs together over WAN.  Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support.Job: Security Analyst - Security Analysts essentially perform the same tasks a NOC/SOC analysts but focussing on security only... eg. Firewall Alerts, Virus Detection on Server/Desktops, performing written security operation procedures, but no real hands on the equipment or deciding on policies.  Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:   Training: CCNP, VCP6-NV: CCNP's allow you to learn more than just basic operation and setup that a CCNA provides. You will learn more complex setups and troubleshooting procedures and be able to setup, manage, maintain large scale deployments on a Enterprise or Telco scale. VCP6-NV allows you to expand out and understand how VMWare, world's largest and most common virtualization provider does network virtualization and to work with converged infrastructure (server & storage) and design and deploy accordingly.  Job: Network Administrator/Security Admin - Network Administrators are the ones in charge of setting up networks, supporting them, and some design work, but it's mostly operational (hands-on). Your time will be mostly spent troubleshooting problems with the network (Why is the link to office B so slow; Customers in City B aren't able to reach google.com; The link to City D is down and the backup link didn't kick in.) Security Admins deal with IDS/IPS, Virus Scanners and may share some Firewall duties with the Network team but are more interested in Threats coming through a firewall port as opposed to the firewall itself. Time is usually spent monitoring anti-virus servers, isolating affected hosts, setting up VPN policies, creating/modifying IDS/IPS rules and ordering server/desktop admins to patch the latest exploit. Senior career and training regimen should be:Training: CCIE, CCAr.  CCIE/CCAr's are the absolute authorities on cisco networking and have the skill to properly plan, implement, manage and maintain the most large and complex of networks.Job: Network/Infrastructure Architect - If Comcast tells you, "Hey, we need to provide Internet service to a city of a million people where we currently don't give any service to, make it happen." you don't bat an eye. Network Architects have a deep fundamental understanding of how networking works on a small and epic scale and can easily design network solutions to deliver services to just 1 or 1,000,000 end-users.infrastructure Architects are the guys who understand infrastructure and have a solid education and work background dealing with all aspects of IT technology: Compute, Network, Storage and are able to design complete IT ecosystems/solutions to tackle today and tomorrow's business problems and solutions. You'll be making bank, especially if you work for one of the big companies or as an independent contractor.  

Infrastructure/Infosec/Architect

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training: Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Server technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on server, make sure it's mostly about Windows, Linux, VMWare, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Databases etc. Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support.Job: Security Analyst - Security Analysts essentially perform the same tasks a NOC/SOC analysts but focussing on security only... eg. Firewall Alerts, Virus Detection on Server/Desktops, performing written security operation procedures, but no real hands on the equipment or deciding on policies.Your intermediate career and training regimen should be: Training: Based on whichever you found preferable above, you will take either RHCE or MSCE Certification in order to become wholly sufficient in setting up and managing advanced deployments of server technologies. You may supplement this with an even more specialized certification such as MCSD: Sharepoint or VCP depending on which technologies you've encountered during your employment that interests you.  Job: System Administrator/Security Administrator - System Administrators are the ones who are responsible for installing, configuring and maintaining the server infrastructure that you have learned about in Server+ and perhaps even done some of their less critical job functions as a SOC Analyst. Many support teams will come to you for when an application they installed on your server is not functioning, or when a server that is performing a critical function (like email) stops functioning. System Administrators are usually a 9-5 job but with the expectation to answer support calls 24/7 (May be paid/unpaid).  Security Admins deal with IDS/IPS, Virus Scanners and may share some Firewall duties with the Network team but are more interested in Threats coming through a firewall port as opposed to the firewall itself. Time is usually spent monitoring anti-virus servers, isolating affected hosts, setting up VPN policies, creating/modifying IDS/IPS rules and ordering server/desktop admins to patch the latest exploit.Senior career and training regimen should be:Training: AWS CSAP, MCSD: Azure, VCDX. By this point, you should have supplemented your basic certifications with more advanced and specialized ones pertaining to operations (hands-on) work to your area of expertise. But now is the time to move one level up.Job: Cloud or Infrastructure Architect - Cloud or infrastructure Architects are the guys who understand infrastructure and have a solid education and work background dealing with all aspects of IT technology: Compute, Network, Storage and are able to design complete IT ecosystems/solutions to tackle today and tomorrow's business problems and solutions. You'll be making bank, especially if you work for one of the big companies or as an independent contractor.

DBA/SME

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Database technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on Databases, make sure it's mostly about Databases & Software, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Server etc.  Job: Application Support Analyst (No, not the kind that you call up when you are having problems using iTunes or Windows) - App Support Analysts are usually 9-5 jobs and are tasked with maintaining and support applications that business uses (Not things like MS Office, outlook, skype etc.) but specialized applications like Trouble Ticketing Systems, Internally Coded Applications, Website Backend programs, Custom Software etc. etc. You will be able to dabble a little with servers, understand application architecture, business processes, and learn how to properly manage software delivery lifecycles.Job: Storage &/or Backup Analyst - Storage & Backup Analysts are in charge of the Storing and presenting/archiving data.  Servers nowadays do not have local physical harddrives like we do in our home computers.  Most have their C: drives from a remote source such as a SAN.  Analysts are tasked with provisioning, presenting, maintaining the storage for servers as well as backing up their data and implementing policies for both.Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Oracle DBA, MCDBA etc. Focus on at least 2 different database vendors to increase your job marketability and compliment it with a certification that's relevant to it... eg. Oracle is usually run on Linux/Unix and VMWare, so get an introductory cert in those if you haven't already. Job: Database Administrator - DBAs manage databases. What does that mean? If an application needs to store unstructured data, you help setup and manage the platform that provides that service. You may be expected to help developers create queries so they can best extract that data in a easily digestible format. You will learn how to optimize queries and database structures so the data can be extracted at lightspeed. Senior career and training regimen should be: Training: Oracle DWCIS, Hadoop CDA, TOGAF By this point, you should have supplemented your basic certifications with more advanced and specialized ones pertaining to operations (hands-on) work to your area of expertise. But now is the time to move one level up.Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results.

Network Admin/SME

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:  Server+, CCNA: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Network technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on network, make sure it's mostly about WAN, Wireless, Firewalls, and only a few courses on Servers, Storage, Databases etc. CCNA provides you with vendor specific (Cisco) knowledge on the setup & operation of Routers/Switches and advanced networking theory on how to connect computers and LANs together over WAN.  Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support.  Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: CCNP, VCP6-NV: CCNP's allow you to learn more than just basic operation and setup that a CCNA provides. You will learn more complex setups and troubleshooting procedures and be able to setup, manage, maintain large scale deployments on a Enterprise or Telco scale. VCP6-NV allows you to expand out and understand how VMWare, world's largest and most common virtualization provider does network virtualization and to work with converged infrastructure (server & storage) and design and deploy accordingly. Job: Network Administrator - Network Administrators are the ones in charge of setting up networks, supporting them, and some design work, but it's mostly operational (hands-on). Your time will be mostly spent troubleshooting problems with the network (Why is the link to office B so slow; Customers in City B aren't able to reach google.com; The link to City D is down and the backup link didn't kick in.) Senior career and training regimen should be: Based on what you took above, CCIE, CISSP, SANS GIAC in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Networks or Security. You might not know everything about other areas (eg. BGP Routing) but you will be the absolute authority about your own area (eg.  SIP Routing).Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results. 

Infrastructure Admin/SME

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Server technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on server, make sure it's mostly about Windows, Linux, VMWare, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Databases etc. Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support. Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Based on whichever you found preferable above, you will take either RHCE or MSCE Certification in order to become wholly sufficient in setting up and managing advanced deployments of server technologies. You may supplement this with an even more specialized certification such as MCSD: Sharepoint or VCP depending on which technologies you've encountered during your employment that interests you. Job: System Administrator/Virtualization Administrator - System Administrators are the ones who are responsible for installing, configuring and maintaining the server infrastructure that you have learned about in Server+ and perhaps even done some of their less critical job functions as a SOC Analyst. Many support teams will come to you for when an application they installed on your server is not functioning, or whenSenior career and training regimen should be:Based on what you took above, more MCSE and MCSD or RH/VMWare Equivalents in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Microsoft or Redhat or Virtualization. You might not know everything about other areas (eg. Windows Active Directory) but you will be the absolute authority about your own area (eg. Sharepoint).Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results. 

Devops/SME

Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Server technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on server, make sure it's mostly about Windows, Linux, VMWare, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Databases etc. But make sure at least 1 or 2 of the courses are PROGRAMMING ones. Job: Application Support Analyst (No, not the kind that you call up when you are having problems using iTunes or Windows) - App Support Analysts are usually 9-5 jobs and are tasked with maintaining and support applications that business uses (Not things like MS Office, outlook, skype etc.) but specialized applications like Trouble Ticketing Systems, Internally Coded Applications, Website Backend programs, Custom Software etc. etc. You will be able to dabble a little with servers, understand application architecture, business processes, and learn how to properly manage software delivery lifecycles. Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Based on whichever you found preferable above, you will take either RHCE or MSCE Certification in order to become wholly sufficient in setting up and managing advanced deployments of server technologies. You may supplement this with an even more specialized certification such as MCSD: Sharepoint or VCP depending on which technologies you've encountered during your employment that interests you. Job: System Administrator/Virtualization Administrator - System Administrators are the ones who are responsible for installing, configuring and maintaining the server infrastructure that you have learned about in Server+ and perhaps even done some of their less critical job functions as a SOC Analyst. Many support teams will come to you for when an application they installed on your server is not functioning, or when a server that is performing a critical function (like email) stops functioning. System Administrators are usually a 9-5 job but with the expectation to answer support calls 24/7 (May be paid/unpaid).Senior career and training regimen should be:Based on what you took above, more Vendor Specific certs in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Devops. (eg. AWS, Chef, Puppet, Docker, Cloupia). Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results. 

Beginner DBA/SME

Your entry career and training regimen should be:Training: A+/Net+/: These certifications enable you to have a solid understanding of consumer/end-user computing technologies, how to diagnose & troubleshoot and operate computers.  Net+ enables you to understand how exactly networking delivers/manages services to the end-user.  Both are pretty non-vendor specific. Job: Desktop Support/IT Tier 1 Helpdesk: Tier 1 Helpdesks are usually tasked with answering calls from other people in the company, generating tickets, giving basic troubleshooting, performing documented tasks from other teams, basic user management and support.  Desktop support you will be building, fixing PCs, troubleshooting end-user software (Such as Outlook, Office, Skype), supporting mobile devices, doing office desk moves, printer fixes, software installs, desktop software license checks.  You will at the end of this, be an expert at PC hardware and know more than enough about Client OS' (Win 10, 8, XP, Ubuntu etc.) which provides a great base for the next step.  Your early career and training regimen should be:Training:Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Database technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on Databases, make sure it's mostly about Databases & Software, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Server etc.  Job: Application Support Analyst (No, not the kind that you call up when you are having problems using iTunes or Windows) - App Support Analysts are usually 9-5 jobs and are tasked with maintaining and support applications that business uses (Not things like MS Office, outlook, skype etc.) but specialized applications like Trouble Ticketing Systems, Internally Coded Applications, Website Backend programs, Custom Software etc. etc. You will be able to dabble a little with servers, understand application architecture, business processes, and learn how to properly manage software delivery lifecycles. Your intermediate career and training regimen should be:Training: Oracle DBA, MCDBA etc. Focus on at least 2 different database vendors to increase your job marketability and compliment it with a certification that's relevant to it... eg. Oracle is usually run on Linux/Unix and VMWare, so get an introductory cert in those if you haven't already. Job: Database Administrator - DBAs manage databases. What does that mean? If an application needs to store unstructured data, you help setup and manage the platform that provides that service. You may be expected to help developers create queries so they can best extract that data in a easily digestible format. You will learn how to optimize queries and database structures so the data can be extracted at lightspeed.Senior career and training regimen should be:   Based on what you took above, more MCSE and MCSD or RH/VMWare Equivalents in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Microsoft or Redhat or Virtualization. You might not know everything about other areas (eg. Windows Active Directory) but you will be the absolute authority about your own area (eg. Sharepoint).Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results.  

Beginner Network/SME

Your entry career and training regimen should be:Training: A+/Net+/: These certifications enable you to have a solid understanding of consumer/end-user computing technologies, how to diagnose & troubleshoot and operate computers.  Net+ enables you to understand how exactly networking delivers/manages services to the end-user.  Both are pretty non-vendor specific. Job: Desktop Support/IT Tier 1 Helpdesk: Tier 1 Helpdesks are usually tasked with answering calls from other people in the company, generating tickets, giving basic troubleshooting, performing documented tasks from other teams, basic user management and support.  Desktop support you will be building, fixing PCs, troubleshooting end-user software (Such as Outlook, Office, Skype), supporting mobile devices, doing office desk moves, printer fixes, software installs, desktop software license checks.  You will at the end of this, be an expert at PC hardware and know more than enough about Client OS' (Win 10, 8, XP, Ubuntu etc.) which provides a great base for the next step.  Your early career and training regimen should be:Training: Server+, CCNA: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Network technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on network, make sure it's mostly about WAN, Wireless, Firewalls, and only a few courses on Servers, Storage, Databases etc. CCNA provides you with vendor specific (Cisco) knowledge on the setup & operation of Routers/Switches and advanced networking theory on how to connect computers and LANs together over WAN.  Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support. Your intermediate career and training regimen should be: Training: CCNP, VCP6-NV: CCNP's allow you to learn more than just basic operation and setup that a CCNA provides. You will learn more complex setups and troubleshooting procedures and be able to setup, manage, maintain large scale deployments on a Enterprise or Telco scale. VCP6-NV allows you to expand out and understand how VMWare, world's largest and most common virtualization provider does network virtualization and to work with converged infrastructure (server & storage) and design and deploy accordingly. Job: Network Administrator - Network Administrators are the ones in charge of setting up networks, supporting them, and some design work, but it's mostly operational (hands-on). Your time will be mostly spent troubleshooting problems with the network (Why is the link to office B so slow; Customers in City B aren't able to reach google.com; The link to City D is down and the backup link didn't kick in.) Senior career and training regimen should be: Based on what you took above, CCIE, CISSP, SANS GIAC in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Networks or Security. You might not know everything about other areas (eg. BGP Routing) but you will be the absolute authority about your own area (eg.  SIP Routing).Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results. 

Beginner Infrastructure/SME

Your entry career and training regimen should be:Training:A+/Net+/: These certifications enable you to have a solid understanding of consumer/end-user computing technologies, how to diagnose & troubleshoot and operate computers.  Net+ enables you to understand how exactly networking delivers/manages services to the end-user.  Both are pretty non-vendor specific. Job: Desktop Support/IT Tier 1 Helpdesk: Tier 1 Helpdesks are usually tasked with answering calls from other people in the company, generating tickets, giving basic troubleshooting, performing documented tasks from other teams, basic user management and support.  Desktop support you will be building, fixing PCs, troubleshooting end-user software (Such as Outlook, Office, Skype), supporting mobile devices, doing office desk moves, printer fixes, software installs, desktop software license checks.  You will at the end of this, be an expert at PC hardware and know more than enough about Client OS' (Win 10, 8, XP, Ubuntu etc.) which provides a great base for the next step.Your early career and training regimen should be:Training: Server+: This enables you to have a basic understanding of the functions that servers have inside of a company and how a server differs from a regular computer. RHCSA or MCSA: Based on which seemed more appealing above take one (or both!) of these certification so you can properly configure & manage server assets. Optional: 1 or 2 Year IT Associate Degree with the program focusing on Server technologies (Please ensure that the course list is at least 60% your core discipline and 40% roundout... eg. If you are focussing on server, make sure it's mostly about Windows, Linux, VMWare, and only a few courses on Network, Storage, Databases etc. Job: SOC/NOC Analyst - SOC/NOC Analysts are usually not customer facing and only communicate with internal support teams. Their job consists mainly of monitoring servers/networks and alerting the appropriate teams when something goes wrong or executing pre-written instructions made by their peers. SOC/NOC Analysts are generally more technically adept and paid better than Helpdesk/Desktop/End-User Support. Your intermediate career and training regimen should be: Training: Based on whichever you found preferable above, you will take either RHCE or MSCE Certification in order to become wholly sufficient in setting up and managing advanced deployments of server technologies. You may supplement this with an even more specialized certification such as MCSD: Sharepoint or VCP depending on which technologies you've encountered during your employment that interests you. Job: System Administrator/Virtualization Administrator - System Administrators are the ones who are responsible for installing, configuring and maintaining the server infrastructure that you have learned about in Server+ and perhaps even done some of their less critical job functions as a SOC Analyst. Many support teams will come to you for when an application they installed on your server is not functioning, or when a server that is performing a critical function (like email) stops functioning. System Administrators are usually a 9-5 job but with the expectation to answer support calls 24/7 (May be paid/unpaid).Senior career and training regimen should be:Based on what you took above, more MCSE and MCSD or RH/VMWare Equivalents in order to become a subject matter expert on a particular area of Microsoft or Redhat or Virtualization. You might not know everything about other areas (eg. Windows Active Directory) but you will be the absolute authority about your own area (eg. Sharepoint).Job: Vendor PFE or SA. You will be working directly for a vendor (Cisco, Microsoft, Redhat etc.) and will be requested whenever a company wants to implement a particular piece of technology from the company but needs vendor guidance on how to design, implement, migrate etc etc. This is where you come in. PFE jobs usually involve alot of travel (Yay! Steak & Lobster for lunch and dinner everyday!) and tackling a lot of complex challenges as they figure out how to deploy their product into a completely unknown ecosystem, sometimes with disastrous results.
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Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Do you like dealing with people?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 2. 
    Do computers actually interest you?  Not just for playing games and surfing reddit, but stuff like managing a website, running a minecraft server, setting up a home media server, or pcmasterrace stuff.
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

    • C. 

      Sometimes

  • 3. 
    Have you built your own PC with no outside help? (No asking friends, no watching youtube, no websites etc.)
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 4. 
    Do you like making decisions or implementing decisions that others make?
    • A. 

      Make

    • B. 

      Implement

  • 5. 
    Do you like a regular M-F 9 to 5 schedule or something irregular with long/short breaks inbetween?
    • A. 

      Regular

    • B. 

      Irregular

  • 6. 
    Are you comfortable talking to strangers (possibly angry ones that actually do know more than you) on the phone?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 7. 
    Which would interest you more?Vehicular Road infrastructure (roads, congestion, best routes to take etc etc) and how the city decides how and where to build roads and how many lanes or interchanges or how it could do a better job of handling traffic to make the commute easier, traffic light placement, speedbumps.OR, Hotels and how they decide on how many single bed/ twin/ suites to have, where and how many restaurants should be in it, how many staff to hire, which keycard system to use, location of elevators.OR, Sewers and how does a city of a million people collect and process wastewater from the home. Where it's held, where it's treated, how it's treated, where does the end product go, how to supply every household with enough water?
    • A. 

      Roads

    • B. 

      Hotels

    • C. 

      Sewers

  • 8. 
    Do you ever wonder just how many harddrives it takes to store all the photos/videos on Imgur/Instagram/Youtube?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 9. 
    Do you ever wonder what is actually happening when you get an Imgur/Reddit is overloaded page?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 10. 
    Do ebay/amazon search results frustrate you (I searched for X, and all the results were Y) and ever think about or wonder how it can be improved?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 11. 
    Are the cables from your Xbox, Bluray, Media Box to your TV a tangled mess or neatly tied in bundles?
    • A. 

      Tangled

    • B. 

      Bundled

  • 12. 
    Are you OK with being woken up at 3am every couple days?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 13. 
    Do repetitive tasks bore you?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 14. 
    Can you explain a technical solution easily to a non-technical person?
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

  • 15. 
    Do you like solving problems, or coming up with pro-active solutions so those problems don't take place? 
    • A. 

      Solve

    • B. 

      Pro-Active

  • 16. 
    Did the hacking scenes in the Matrix seem realistic to you? (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_owIJy8Xic)
    • A. 

      Yes

    • B. 

      No

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