Collocations About Teaching: Trivia Quiz!

Approved & Edited by ProProfs Editorial Team
The editorial team at ProProfs Quizzes consists of a select group of subject experts, trivia writers, and quiz masters who have authored over 10,000 quizzes taken by more than 100 million users. This team includes our in-house seasoned quiz moderators and subject matter experts. Our editorial experts, spread across the world, are rigorously trained using our comprehensive guidelines to ensure that you receive the highest quality quizzes.
Learn about Our Editorial Process
| By Jomango
J
Jomango
Community Contributor
Quizzes Created: 6 | Total Attempts: 15,075
Questions: 10 | Attempts: 2,019

SettingsSettingsSettings
Collocations About Teaching: Trivia Quiz! - Quiz

Collocations are words that are usually used together, sometimes for no apparent reason. For example, although 'little' and 'small' have the same meaning, we usually say, "When I was a little boy/girl" but not "When I was a small boy/girl." In this quiz, there are some common collocations used by teachers and learners. Take this quiz to find the answers.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Which of these is NOT a strong collocation with 'homework'?

    • A.

      Set

    • B.

      Hand in

    • C.

      Make

    • D.

      Mark

    • E.

      Do

    Correct Answer
    C. Make
    Explanation
    A teacher 'sets' homework when s/he tells the students what to do. Then they 'do' it (or don't do it!). The 'hand in' the homework to the teacher for him/her to 'mark', so they know which answers they got right and wrong.

    Rate this question:

  • 2. 

    Which of these is NOT a strong collocation with ' (a/the) board' (ie blackboard or whiteboard?

    • A.

      Clean

    • B.

      Delete

    • C.

      Rubber

    • D.

      Put something on

    • E.

      Pen

    Correct Answer
    B. Delete
    Explanation
    The teacher (or a student) 'puts something on' the board with a 'board pen' (on a whiteboard) or with chalk (for a blackboard). Later the teacher can 'clean' the board with a 'board rubber'. You can't delete the board, but you can delete words on the board.

    Rate this question:

  • 3. 

    Which of these is NOT a strong collocation with '(an) exam'?

    • A.

      Make

    • B.

      Sit

    • C.

      Do

    • D.

      Take

    • E.

      Retake

    Correct Answer
    A. Make
    Explanation
    Our poor students have to 'do', 'take' or 'sit' exams. They all mean the same but 'sit' sounds more formal. If they aren't successful the first time they may have to 'retake' an exam (or 'resit').

    Rate this question:

  • 4. 

    Which of these collocations with '(an/the) exam' has a different meaning?

    • A.

      Pass

    • B.

      Look through

    • C.

      Sail through

    • D.

      Scrape through

    • E.

      Get through

    Correct Answer
    B. Look through
    Explanation
    You might 'look through' the exam when you are given the paper, so you can get an idea of what it contains. In all the others you get a successful result. If you 'pass' or 'get through' the exam, it's good but we don't know how well you did. If the pass mark for the exam is 50%, and you get 51%, then you 'scrape through' it. But if you get 95% then you 'sail through' it.

    Rate this question:

  • 5. 

    One more about exams. Which one is different? (clue: before or after?)

    • A.

      Cram for an exam

    • B.

      Revise for an exam

    • C.

      Remember doing an exam

    • D.

      Study for an exam

    • E.

      Do a mock exam

    Correct Answer
    C. Remember doing an exam
    Explanation
    Before a real exam, you might 'do a mock exam' so you know what to expect. And you need to 'study' or 'revise' for the exam. If you've left it rather late and perhaps you haven't done much work during the course, you might need to 'cram for' the exam. But you 'remember doing' an exam afterward, and maybe you think "Oh no! Why did I write THAT?"

    Rate this question:

  • 6. 

    Look at these expressions with 'try'. In four of them, the teacher seems disappointed with the student's behavior or work. Which one is different?

    • A.

      Try not to fidget

    • B.

      Try harder

    • C.

      Try to behave

    • D.

      Try again

    • E.

      Try your best

    Correct Answer
    E. Try your best
    Explanation
    If the teacher thinks the student is able to do better work s/he might say 'try harder'. If the learner gets an answer wrong the teacher can give him/her another chance by saying 'try again'. The teacher or parent of a child who often behaves badly might ask the child to 'try to behave' or, to a child who can't sit still, 'try not to fidget'. But 'try your best' would be said to a student before they started a task, especially if they thought they couldn't do it very well.

    Rate this question:

  • 7. 

    Complete the collocation: "I was running late so I only had time for a _____ shower."

    • A.

      Short

    • B.

      Quick

    • C.

      Fast

    Correct Answer
    B. Quick
    Explanation
    The correct answer is "quick." In this context, "quick" implies that the person only had a limited amount of time and needed to take a shower that was brief and efficient.

    Rate this question:

  • 8. 

    Complete with a verb + adverb collocation: "You'll do it if you ________ enough."

    • A.

      Try hard

    • B.

      Really try

    • C.

      Want to

    Correct Answer
    A. Try hard
    Explanation
    The sentence is expressing that if you put in enough effort and make a strong attempt, you will be able to accomplish the task. The collocation "try hard" conveys the idea of putting in a significant amount of effort and exerting oneself to achieve the desired outcome.

    Rate this question:

  • 9. 

    Collocations can be divided into several types such as _________ collocations.

    • A.

      Verb + noun

    • B.

      Subject + object

    • C.

      First + second

    Correct Answer
    A. Verb + noun
    Explanation
    Collocations can be divided into several types based on the combination of words used. One type of collocation is "verb + noun" where a verb is paired with a noun to form a common expression. This type of collocation is commonly used in language to convey specific meanings and is an important aspect of vocabulary acquisition and usage.

    Rate this question:

  • 10. 

    Which is a common adverb + adjective collocation?

    • A.

      Richly decorated

    • B.

      Richly wealthy

    • C.

       greedily rich

    Correct Answer
    A. Richly decorated
    Explanation
    "Richly decorated" is a common adverb + adjective collocation because it combines the adverb "richly" with the adjective "decorated" to describe something that is adorned or embellished in a lavish or opulent manner. The adverb "richly" intensifies the adjective "decorated" and provides additional information about the extent or quality of the decoration.

    Rate this question:

Quiz Review Timeline +

Our quizzes are rigorously reviewed, monitored and continuously updated by our expert board to maintain accuracy, relevance, and timeliness.

  • Current Version
  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Aug 22, 2009
    Quiz Created by
    Jomango
Back to Top Back to top
Advertisement
×

Wait!
Here's an interesting quiz for you.

We have other quizzes matching your interest.