Difficult English Grammar Quiz Questions And Answers

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K-12 English Expert
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Difficult English Grammar Quiz Questions And Answers - Quiz


Are you up for a challenge? Get ready to tackle these difficult English grammar quiz questions with answers. English, as the world's most widely spoken language, has become an essential skill for individuals across the globe. While many people are proficient in English, grammar remains a common stumbling block. This quiz is designed to put your English grammar knowledge to the test.

If you're confident in your ability to answer intricate questions and pass with flying colors, then this quiz is the perfect opportunity to prove yourself. Dive into this quiz and see how well you fare in this Read moretest of English grammar prowess.

English grammar, being the backbone of effective communication, requires precision and understanding. By participating in this quiz, you're not only competing but also honing your skills and identifying areas that warrant further attention.

Let the competition begin as you take on this challenging English grammar quiz. Your willingness to engage in this endeavor speaks volumes about your commitment to mastering the nuances of the English language. Good luck on this stimulating journey of grammatical discovery!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    • A.

      Obese

    • B.

      Emaciated

    • C.

      Gaunt

    • D.

      Lean

    Correct Answer
    D. Lean
    Explanation
    "Corpulent" refers to someone who is excessively overweight or obese.

    "Lean," as the antonym, describes someone who is slender, with a lower amount of body fat and a more streamlined physique.

    So, when contrasting "corpulent" with "lean," it emphasizes the difference between someone who is significantly overweight and someone who is slender or has a trim body.

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  • 2. 

    • A.

      Enticing

    • B.

      Elusive

    • C.

      Continual

    • D.

      Disappear

    Correct Answer
    D. Disappear
    Explanation
    Fugacious: Describes something transient, fleeting, or lasting for a short time. It emphasizes the impermanence or brevity of a particular quality, state, or experience.

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  • 3. 

    • A.

      Stayed

    • B.

      Liz

    • C.

      An

    • D.

      Actress

    Correct Answer
    D. Actress
    Explanation
    Liz: This is the subject of the sentence. It's the person the sentence is about.

    Stayed: This is the linking verb. Linking verbs connect the subject to a noun or an adjective that renames or describes the subject.

    Actress: This is the predicate noun (or predicate nominative). It follows the linking verb "stayed" and renames or identifies the subject "Liz." In this case, it tells us what Liz stayed as, indicating her profession or role.

    So, the sentence is stating that Liz remained in the state or role of being an actress. "Actress" is the predicate noun because it identifies what Liz stayed as.

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  • 4. 

    • A.

      Onomatopoeia

    • B.

      Metaphor

    • C.

      Personification

    • D.

      Simile

    Correct Answer
    D. Simile
    Explanation
    In the given sentence, "Her hair was like gravy, running brown off her head and clumping on her shoulder," the figure of speech used is:

    Simile

    A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things using the words "like" or "as." In this case, the comparison is made between her hair and gravy, suggesting a similarity between the two in terms of texture, color, or consistency.
     

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  • 5. 

    • A.

      Senility

    • B.

      Superannuation

    • C.

      Dotage

    • D.

      Imbecility

    Correct Answer
    C. Dotage
    Explanation
    Dotage refers to a state of mental decline associated with old age, often characterized by senility or feeblemindedness. It is a period in one's life when cognitive abilities may deteriorate, leading to forgetfulness, confusion, and sometimes foolish or irrational behavior.

    In the context of the given sentence, "extreme old age when a man behaves like a fool," the term "dotage" encapsulates the idea of someone being in a stage of life where cognitive faculties have significantly declined, leading to behavior that might be perceived as foolish.

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  • 6. 

    • A.

      Closed

    • B.

      Decommissioned

    • C.

      Finished

    • D.

      Started

    Correct Answer
    B. Decommissioned
    Explanation
    Decommissioned is the antonym of "commissioned." When something is decommissioned, it means it has been taken out of service, officially discontinued, or revoked. For instance, a decommissioned ship or facility is one that has been retired or withdrawn from active use.

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  • 7. 

    • A.

      I told to him, "You are not working hard."

    • B.

      I said to him, "He is not working hard."

    • C.

      I said, "You are not working hard."

    • D.

      I said to him, "You are not working hard."

    Correct Answer
    D. I said to him, "You are not working hard."
    Explanation
    The reporting verb "told" is replaced with "said to" in direct speech.
    The pronoun "him" remains unchanged in direct speech.
    The conjunction "that" is omitted in direct speech.
    The tense in the reported speech ("he was not working hard") remains the same when reported directly.
    The conversion to direct speech involves conveying the original statement as if it were spoken directly by the speaker, maintaining the essence and meaning of the message.

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  • 8. 

    • A.

      Benifited

    • B.

      Benefited

    • C.

      Benefeted

    • D.

      Benifeated

    Correct Answer
    B. Benefited
    Explanation
    The word "benefited" follows the standard spelling in English. It is spelled with two e's after the letter 't'. The correct spelling adheres to the general rule for forming past tense verbs by adding "-ed" to the base form of the verb.

    Therefore, the correct spelling is "Benefited," and the other variations "Benifited" and "Benefeted" are incorrect.

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  • 9. 

    • A.

      Comes

    • B.

      Came

    • C.

      Come

    • D.

      Are coming

    Correct Answer
    C. Come
    Explanation
    The sentence "How many students in your class _____ from Korea?" is asking about the origin or nationality of the students in the class. In this context, we are interested in knowing the number of students who are currently from Korea.

    Here's a breakdown of each option:

    Comes: This is incorrect. "Comes" is a present tense verb, and it doesn't fit grammatically in this sentence.

    Came: This is incorrect. "Came" is the past tense of the verb "come," and it doesn't match the present tense structure of the question.

    Come: This is the correct choice. In this sentence, "come" is used as a base form of the verb to match the present tense structure of the question.

    Are coming: This is incorrect. "Are coming" is a present continuous tense, and it doesn't fit the structure of the question, which is asking about the current status of students from Korea.

    So, the correct sentence is: "How many students in your class come from Korea?"

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  • 10. 

    • A.

      The

    • B.

      A

    • C.

      An

    • D.

      No article

    Correct Answer
    D. No article
    Explanation
    In this context, we typically use "prison" without an article when referring to a general or unspecified prison. The absence of an article implies that the thief was sent to any prison without specifying a particular one. Using "a" or "the" would imply a specific or known prison, which might not be the intended meaning in this case.

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  • 11. 

    • A.

      He warned her to shoot if she didn't keep quiet calmly.

    • B.

      He said calmly that I shall shoot you if you don't be quiet.

    • C.

      He calmly warned her that if she didn't keep quiet, he would shoot her.

    • D.

      Calmly he warned her that be quiet or else he will have to shoot her.

    Correct Answer
    C. He calmly warned her that if she didn't keep quiet, he would shoot her.
    Explanation
    The reporting verb "said" is replaced with "warned" to convey the speaker's intent more explicitly.
    The pronoun "he" remains unchanged.
    The conjunction "that" is used to introduce the reported speech.
    The tense in the reported speech is adjusted, changing "I shall shoot" to "he would shoot" to reflect the shift from direct to indirect speech.
    The phrase "in a calm voice" is integrated into the description of how he warned her.

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  • 12. 

    • A.

      Parley

    • B.

      Parliamentarian

    • C.

      Parleyed

    • D.

      Parliamentary

    Correct Answer
    D. Parliamentary
    Explanation
    Parliament: A noun referring to the legislative body or assembly, typically composed of elected representatives who make laws, debate policies, and represent the interests of the people.

    Parliamentary: The adjective form derived from "parliament." It is used to describe anything related to or characteristic of a parliament. For example, "parliamentary procedure" refers to the rules and methods used in the functioning of a parliament.

    So, if you want to describe something that is associated with or related to a parliament, you would use the adjective "parliamentary."

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  • 13. 

    • A.

      Against

    • B.

      By

    • C.

      For

    • D.

      Before

    Correct Answer
    A. Against
    Explanation
    In this context, "against" is the appropriate preposition to indicate the direction of the leaning. When someone leans "against" something, it means they are in contact with and supported by that object. In this case, the person is leaning against a lamppost, suggesting physical contact and support from the lamppost.

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  • 14. 

    • A.

      Simple present

    • B.

      Present perfect

    • C.

      Past perfect

    • D.

      Present continuous

    Correct Answer
    B. Present perfect
    Explanation
    The use of "has written" indicates that the action of writing dramas by Shakespeare is completed, but the relevance or impact extends into the present. It suggests a connection between the past and the present. The focus is on the result of the action (the existence of the written dramas) rather than the specific time when the writing occurred. In this context, the sentence emphasizes that Shakespeare's dramas continue to have appeal across different ages, and the writing itself is a completed action with ongoing relevance.

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  • 15. 

    • A.

      He gathered the leaves and got ready to jump in.

    • B.

      He gathered the leaves, and got ready to jump in.

    • C.

      He gathered the leaves, got ready to jump in.

    Correct Answer
    A. He gathered the leaves and got ready to jump in.
    Explanation
    The comma (,) is not needed after "leaves" because "got ready to jump in" is not an independent clause on its own. It is dependent on the main clause "He gathered the leaves."

    The use of "and" serves to connect the two actions, indicating a sequence of events. The conjunction "and" is sufficient to link the actions without the need for an additional comma.

    So, the corrected sentence maintains clarity and proper punctuation.

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  • 16. 

    • A.

      A word that explains

    • B.

      A word that "joins"

    • C.

      A word that describes

    Correct Answer
    B. A word that "joins"
    Explanation
    In grammar, a conjunction is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses within a sentence. Conjunctions are used to coordinate and link different elements, facilitating a smooth flow of ideas and creating logical relationships between them.
    Examples of conjunctions include "and," "but," "or," "nor," "for," "yet," and "so." These words function to connect similar elements, contrast different ideas, or indicate a cause-and-effect relationship. The primary role of conjunctions is to join various parts of a sentence, making the overall structure coherent and cohesive.

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  • 17. 

    • A.

      True

    • B.

      False

    Correct Answer
    A. True
    Explanation
    Most interjections are expressions that convey strong emotions or sudden exclamations. These words often end with an exclamation mark to reflect the heightened emotional tone. Examples of interjections include "Wow!" or "Ouch!" The exclamation mark helps convey the emotional intensity associated with interjections. However, it's important to note that not all interjections end with an exclamation mark, and some can be used in a more neutral tone without the need for an exclamation mark.

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  • 18. 

    • A.

      To think

    • B.

      To take

    • C.

      To use

    Correct Answer
    C. To use
    Explanation
    In this context, "to use" completes the intended meaning of the sentence. The speaker is considering getting a new computer with the purpose or intention of using it for school-related activities.

    Rate this question:

Kristin Brown |MEd |
K-12 English Expert
Kristin is a highly experienced English teacher, editor, and proofreader based in Massachusetts. As a native English speaker, she brings over a decade of expertise to her work with students and clients, ensuring precision and excellence in language and communication. With a passion for cultivating language skills, Kristin is dedicated to helping individuals achieve their linguistic and educational goals.
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