British Phrases And Expressions

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| By Quintilinty
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Quintilinty
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 82
Questions: 6 | Attempts: 82

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Phrase Quizzes & Trivia

Umm. This quiz has British sayings and stuff, so you can see if you know what tickety-boo and skewy-wiff means. I got them from online, and some of these may be very silly, so prepare to laugh your abs off.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    What does the British saying "tickety-boo" mean?

    • A.

      The ticket said boo.

    • B.

      The ticket booth is scaring me!

    • C.

      He/She is telling a pack of lies!!!

    • D.

      Things are going well.

    • E.

      Things are going not that well.

    Correct Answer
    D. Things are going well.
    Explanation
    The British saying "tickety-boo" is used to indicate that things are going well. It is a colloquial expression that implies that everything is in order or proceeding smoothly. The other options provided in the question do not align with the meaning of "tickety-boo".

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  • 2. 

    What does the British saying "skew-wiff" mean?

    • A.

      The screwy wiff of something

    • B.

      Dunno.

    • C.

      Crooked.

    • D.

      Idiot.

    • E.

      Scary thing.

    Correct Answer
    C. Crooked.
    Explanation
    The British saying "skew-wiff" means crooked. It is used to describe something that is not straight or aligned properly. This term is often used to refer to objects or structures that are not in the correct position or alignment.

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  • 3. 

    What does the British saying "put a sock in it" mean?

    • A.

      Shut up.

    • B.

      Put the sock in something.

    • C.

      Clean something out.

    • D.

      Clear something out.

    • E.

      Uhhhhh. I don't know.

    Correct Answer
    A. Shut up.
    Explanation
    The British saying "put a sock in it" is an idiom that means "shut up" or "be quiet." It is often used to tell someone to stop talking or making noise. The phrase originated from the practice of putting a sock into a horn or loudspeaker to muffle the sound. So, when someone says "put a sock in it," they are essentially telling someone to lower their volume or stop talking altogether.

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  • 4. 

    What does the saying "suss" mean?

    • A.

      Stop fussing.

    • B.

      Eat food.

    • C.

      Go to/stop by

    • D.

      Tacos!

    • E.

      Figure out something.

    Correct Answer
    E. Figure out something.
    Explanation
    The saying "suss" means to figure out something. It implies the act of understanding or comprehending a situation or problem. It suggests using one's intelligence or intuition to unravel or solve something.

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  • 5. 

    What does the British saying "alright mush" mean?

    • A.

      Hello.

    • B.

      Hi.

    • C.

      What's new?

    • D.

      What have you been up to?

    • E.

      What's going on?

    Correct Answer
    B. Hi.
    Explanation
    The British saying "alright mush" is a colloquial greeting that is commonly used in some regions of the UK, particularly in the Midlands and the North. "Alright" is a casual way of asking how someone is doing, and "mush" is a term of endearment or familiarity, similar to "mate" or "buddy". So, when someone says "alright mush", they are essentially asking how you are doing in a friendly and informal manner.

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  • 6. 

    What does the British saying "donkey's ears" mean?

    • A.

      Long way to go.

    • B.

      Long period of time.

    • C.

      Long times.

    • D.

      Funny times.

    • E.

      A lot of years.

    Correct Answer
    E. A lot of years.
    Explanation
    The British saying "donkey's ears" refers to a long period of time. This phrase is used to convey the idea of something taking a very long time to happen or occur. The comparison to donkey's ears, which are known for being long, emphasizes the length or duration of the time being referred to.

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