Block 5 Anatomy,Infratemporal,Fossa,Oral,CA Vit,Prt,2

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Anatomy Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    In acute inflammation (arthritis) of the TMJ, the muscle most likely to be affected by the inflammatory process is the:

    • A.

      Temporal

    • B.

      Medial pterygoid

    • C.

      Masseter

    • D.

      Lateral pterygoid

    Correct Answer
    D. Lateral pterygoid
    Explanation
    The inferior head of the lateral pterygoid inserts into the neck of the mandible, while the superior head of the lateral pterygoid inserts directly into the capsule and articular disk of the temporomandibular joint. So, this muscle would be affected by arthritis of the joint. This muscle is the only one that opens the mandible, so this movement might be weakened if there was inflammation at the TMJ.
    Temporalis elevates and retracts the mandible; it inserts on the coronoid process of the mandible and the anterior surface of the ramus of the mandible. The medial pterygoid muscle protracts and elevates the mandible; it inserts on the medial surface of the ramus and angle of the mandible. Finally, the masseter is the muscle that powerfully elevates the mandible--it inserts on the lower half of the ramus of the mandible. None of these other muscles are inserting into the TMJ, so they would not be impaired quite as much as the lateral pterygoid.

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  • 2. 

    In explaining the pain caused by the drilling of a mandibular molar tooth crown to a freshman medical student, a dentist identified the nerve conducting the pain sensations as the:

    • A.

      Lingual

    • B.

      Mylohyoid

    • C.

      Inferior alveolar

    • D.

      Buccal

    Correct Answer
    C. Inferior alveolar
    Explanation
    The inferior alveolar nerve is a branch of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (V3). It travels through the mandibular foramen and provides sensory innervation to the mandibular teeth. The lingual nerve is another branch of V3--it travels in the floor of the mouth and provides sensory innervation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue and the floor of the mouth. The nerve to mylohyoid is a motor branch of V3--it provides motor innervation to mylohyoid and the anterior belly of the digastric. Finally, the buccal nerve is a sensory branch of V3 that supplies the cheek and oral mucosa.

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  • 3. 

    The temporomandibular joint is characterized by all EXCEPT:

    • A.

      A capsule strengthened by ligaments on its lateral side only

    • B.

      A completely flat surface for its gliding action

    • C.

      An articular disc

    • D.

      Extracapsular ligaments

    • E.

      Two joint cavities of different shapes

    Correct Answer
    B. A completely flat surface for its gliding action
    Explanation
    The TMJ joint is a synovial joint with two articular cavities. Each cavity is responsible for a different movement at the joint. The lower part of the joint is the hinge component of the joint. When the joint moves, this hinge component of the joint initiates mandibular opening. The upper part of the joint is the gliding component. During joint movement, this gliding cavity moves to terminate mandibular opening. The gliding cavity is the space between the articular disc and the mandibular fossa and articular eminence of the temporal bone--it's not a completely flat surface.
    There are extracapsular ligaments around the TMJ joint capsule, but these ligaments are on the lateral side only. The lateral ligament reinforces the lateral part of the capsule, while other ligaments (the stylomandibular and sphenomandibular) only have a minor role in stabilizing the joint capsule. There is also an articular disc dividing the two components of the joint, and the two cavities are different shapes. See Netter Plate 11 for a picture of all of these structures.

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  • 4. 

    In dislocation of the jaw, displacement of the articular disc beyond the articular tubercle of the temporomandibular joint results from excessive contraction of which muscle?

    • A.

      Buccinator

    • B.

      Lateral pterygoid

    • C.

      Medial pterygoid

    • D.

      Masseter

    • E.

      Temporalis

    Correct Answer
    B. Lateral pterygoid
    Explanation
    The TMJ may dislocate anteriorly due to excessive contraction of the lateral pterygoids (for example, during excessive opening of the mouth). This could happen if someone yawned too much or took a large bite of food. Posterior dislocations of the TMJ are rare due to resistance from the postglenoid tubercle and the strong lateral ligaments.
    The buccinator is an important muscle for mastication because it keeps the cheek taut, so the cheek can press against the molars. However, it is a facial muscle innervated by the facial nerve, and it is not active at the TMJ. The medial pterygoid, masseter and temporalis produce motion at the TMJ, but contracting these muscles does not cause the joint to dislocate.

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  • 5. 

    Sympathetic fibers reach the tongue by way of the:

    • A.

      Lingual nerve

    • B.

      Maxillary artery

    • C.

      Hypoglossal nerve

    • D.

      Lingual artery

    • E.

      Glossopharyngeal nerve

    Correct Answer
    D. Lingual artery
    Explanation
    Remember--all over the body, the vasculature is the number one target of sympathetic nerves. Sympathetic nerves help to constrict the vasculature, and they are found covering arteries in periarterial plexuses. In the head, sympathetics travel to targets on vessels. So, you know that the sympathetic nerves are coming to the tongue on an artery--now, you just need to determine what artery goes to the tongue. And that artery is the lingual artery.
    The lingual artery is the second branch off the anterior side of the external carotid artery. It travels in the floor of the mouth and supplies blood to the tongue, suprahyoid muscles, and the palatine tonsil. This is the artery going to the targeted area, so that's the answer you're looking for. The maxillary artery is one of the 2 terminal branches of the external carotid artery. It supplies blood to the deep face and infratemporal fossa. It is not going to the tongue.
    As far as the nerves go... The lingual nerve is a branch of V3, the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. It supplies general sensation (touch and temperature) to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. (Taste sensation for the anterior 2/3 of the tongue arrives at the tongue by way of the lingual nerve, but the original fibers for taste came from the chorda tympani, a branch of CN VII.) The hypoglossal nerve (CN XII) provides motor innervation to the muscles of the tongue. The glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) provides taste sensation and general sensation to the posterior 1/3 of the tongue.

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  • 6. 

    After a radiograph revealed a sialolith (stone) in a patient's right submandibular duct, the surgeon exposed the duct via an intraoral approach. In this approach, what tissues or structures must be cut through?

    • A.

      Mucous membrane only

    • B.

      Mucous membrane and genioglossus muscle

    • C.

      Mucous membrane and mylohyoid muscle

    • D.

      Mucous membrane and hyoglossus muscle

    Correct Answer
    A. Mucous membrane only
    Explanation
    The submandibular duct is found deep to the mucous membrane of the mouth, but superficial to the muscles of the tongue and the muscles on the floor of the mouth. So, genioglossus, mylohyoid, and hyoglossus are deep to the submandibular duct. See Netter Plate 56B for a picture of these relationships.

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  • 7. 

    Damage of the lingual nerve before it is joined by the chorda tympani in the infratemporal fossa would cause loss of:

    • A.

      General sensation to the anterior two thirds of the tongue

    • B.

      General sensation to the posterior one third of the tongue

    • C.

      Secretion of the submandibular gland

    • D.

      Taste sensation from the anterior two thirds of the tongue

    • E.

      Taste sensation from the posterior one third of the tongue

    Correct Answer
    A. General sensation to the anterior two thirds of the tongue
    Explanation
    The lingual nerve is a branch of V3, the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. It transmits general sensation from the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. Damaging this nerve anywhere along its course would cause someone to lose general sensation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. The chorda tympani is a branch of VII--it carries taste fibers to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue and presynaptic parasympathetic fibers to the submandibular ganglion. The fibers from the chorda tympani join the lingual nerve as they travel to the submandibular ganglion and the anterior tongue. However, if the lingual nerve was damaged before the chorda tympani had joined it, the chorda tympani fibers would still be intact. So, there would still be taste innervation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue and the submandibular gland would still secrete. If the lingual nerve was disrupted after the chorda tympani had already joined it, there would be no secretomotor innervation to the submandibular and sublingual glands, and there would be no taste or general sensation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue.
    As for the posterior 1/3 of the tongue, it receives taste and general sensation from the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX).

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  • 8. 

    The teeth and gums separate the oral cavity proper from the:

    • A.

      Nasal cavity

    • B.

      Oral vestibule

    • C.

      Oropharynx

    • D.

      Paralingual space

    • E.

      Submandibular space

    Correct Answer
    B. Oral vestibule
    Explanation
    The oral vestibule is the space in the mouth lying between the lips and the teeth. See Netter Plate 45 for an illustration of the mouth--although the vestibule isn't labeled, you can get some idea of where it lies. The nasal cavities are spaces that connect the nasopharynx with the external environment. The roof of the nasal cavity is made of the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone. The floor of the nasal cavity is made of the hard palate. The medial wall is made by the nasal septum, and the lateral wall is the place where the inferior, superior, and middle conchae project into the nasal cavity.
    The oropharynx is the middle part of the pharynx, found behind the mouth. It communicates anteriorly with oral cavity through the palatoglossal arch, superiorly with the nasopharynx through the posterior margin of soft palate, and inferiorly with the laryngopharynx at the superior margin of epiglottis. The oropharynx contains the palatine tonsil, which is located between the palatoglossal arch and the palatopharyngeal arch.
    The paralingual space is a space inside the floor of the mouth. It is bounded by the mylohyoid muscle, the lateral tongue, the hyoid bone, and the oral mucosa. The paralingual space contains the deep portion of the submandibular gland, the lingual nerve and submandibular ganglia, the sublingual gland and fold, and the hypoglossal nerve.
    Finally, the submandibular space is a space defined by the body of the mandible and the anterior and posterior digastric muscles. It contains the superficial submandibular gland, mylohyoid and stylohyoid muscles, the facial artery, and the facial vein.

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  • 9. 

    Examination of a patient with an ulcerative carcinoma of the posterior third of the tongue revealed bleeding from the lesion and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). The bleeding was seen to be arterial; which of the following arteries was involved?

    • A.

      Deep lingual

    • B.

      Dorsal lingual

    • C.

      Facial

    • D.

      Sublingual

    • E.

      Tonsillar

    Correct Answer
    B. Dorsal lingual
    Explanation
    The dorsal lingual artery runs on the superficial surface of the tongue--it is a branch of the lingual artery that delivers blood to the posterior superficial tongue. So, this artery must be the source of the hemorrhage. The deep lingual artery and sublingual artery are two terminal branches of the lingual artery. These branches run in the floor of the mouth (sublingual) and the deep surface of the tongue (deep lingual). See Netter Plate 53 for a picture. The facial artery is a branch of the external carotid artery that courses across the face. The tonsillar artery is a branch of the facial artery that supplies blood to the palatine tonsil.

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  • 10. 

    Examination of a patient with an ulcerative carcinoma of the posterior third of the tongue revealed bleeding from the lesion and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). The difficulty in swallowing was due to involvement of which muscle that elevates the tongue?

    • A.

      Genioglossus

    • B.

      Hyoglossus

    • C.

      Styloglossus

    • D.

      Stylohyoid

    • E.

      Stylopharyngeus

    Correct Answer
    C. Styloglossus
    Explanation
    Styloglossus retracts and elevates the tongue. Genioglossus is a large, fan shaped muscle with many actions: its inferior fibers protrude the tongue, its middle fibers depress the tongue, and its superior fibers draw the tip back and down. Hyoglossus retracts and depresses the tongue. All of these muscles are innervated by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). Stylohyoid elevates and retracts the hyoid bone. It is innervated by the facial nerve (CN VII). Stylopharyngeus elevates the larynx--it is innervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX).

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  • 11. 

    Cutting of the hypoglossal nerve in the hypoglossal canal would not interrupt the nerve supply to the:

    • A.

      Hyoglossus muscle

    • B.

      Genioglossus muscle

    • C.

      Palatoglossus muscle

    • D.

      Styloglossus muscle

    Correct Answer
    C. Palatoglossus muscle
    Explanation
    All of the tongue muscles are innervated by the hypoglossal nerve. So, hyoglossus, genioglossus, and styloglossus are all innervated by the hypoglossal nerve. Although palatoglossus sounds like a tongue muscle, it is a palatal muscle, innervated by the vagus nerve. (Palatoglossus is the only "glossus" muscle that is not innervated by the hypoglossal nerve.)

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  • 12. 

    The contents of the paralingual space do NOT include the:

    • A.

      Hypoglossal nerve

    • B.

      Lingual artery

    • C.

      Lingual nerve

    • D.

      Submandibular gland

    • E.

      Sublingual gland

    Correct Answer
    B. Lingual artery
    Explanation
    The paralingual space is a space inside the floor of the mouth. It is bounded by the mylohyoid muscle, the lateral tongue, the hyoid bone, and the oral mucosa. The paralingual space contains the deep portion of the submandibular gland, the lingual nerve and submandibular ganglion, the sublingual gland and fold, and the hypoglossal nerve. The lingual artery is not in the paralingual space.

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  • 13. 

    A patient is unable to taste a piece of sugar placed on the anterior part of the tongue. Which cranial nerve is most likely to have a lesion?

    • A.

      Facial nerve

    • B.

      Glossopharyngeal nerve

    • C.

      Hypoglossal nerve

    • D.

      Trigeminal nerve

    • E.

      Vagus nerve

    Correct Answer
    A. Facial nerve
    Explanation
    Taste fibers to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue come from the chorda tympani--a branch of the facial nerve. So, if the patient has lost taste sensation to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue, the patient might have a lesion of the facial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) carries taste and general sensory fibers to the posterior 1/3 of the tongue. The hypoglossal nerve (CN XII) gives motor innervation to all the muscles of the tongue (ie, all the muscles that end in glossus except for palatoglossus, which is a palate muscle innervated by the vagus). The trigeminal nerve supplies general sensory fibers to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue via the lingual nerve, a branch of V3. Remember, the chorda tympani fibers jump on the lingual nerve to reach the tongue, but the chorda tympani fibers originate from the facial nerve! Finally, the vagus nerve supplies general and taste sensation to a very small part of the posterior tongue, right next to the epiglottis.

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  • 14. 

    The chorda tympani contains which component before it joins the lingual nerve?

    • A.

      Preganglionic sympathetics

    • B.

      Postganglionic sympathetics

    • C.

      Preganglionic parasympathetics

    • D.

      Postganglionic parasympathetics

    • E.

      Taste fibers to the posterior third of the tongue

    Correct Answer
    C. Preganglionic parasympathetics
    Explanation
    The chorda tympani contains preganglionic parasympathetic nerves that go to the submandibular ganglion. These preganglionic parasympathetics synapse in the submandibular ganglion and then provide secretomotor innervation to the submandibular and sublingual glands. The chorda tympani also contains taste fibers to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue, but not to the posterior 1/3.

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  • 15. 

    The cell bodies of the taste fibers from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue are located in the:

    • A.

      Geniculate ganglion

    • B.

      Otic ganglion

    • C.

      Pterygopalatine ganglion

    • D.

      Submandibular ganglion

    • E.

      Trigeminal ganglion

    Correct Answer
    A. Geniculate ganglion
    Explanation
    The geniculate ganglion is the sensory ganglion of the facial nerve--it holds the cell bodies of the neurons that carry taste sensations from the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. These fibers then travel on the chorda tympani, which carries the fibers to the lingual nerve. The chorda tympani fibers then jump on the lingual nerve so they can reach the tongue and provide taste sensation to the anterior 2/3. The otic ganglion is the ganglion where parasympathetic fibers synapse before innervating the parotid gland. The lesser petrosal nerve is a branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) that carries presynaptic parasympathetic fibers to the otic ganglion. These fibers synapse in the otic ganglion, and the postsynaptic fibers travel on the auriculotemporal nerve to the parotid gland.
    The pterygopalatine ganglion is the ganglion that enables secretomotor innervation to the mucous glands of the palate, nasal cavity, and lacrimal gland. Preganglionic fibers arrive at this ganglion from the greater petrosal nerve of the facial nerve. The submandibular ganglion receives preganglionic parasympathetic fibers from the chorda tympani; the postsynaptic fibers from the submandibular ganglion go to provide secretomotor innervation to the sublingual and submandibular glands. Finally, the trigeminal ganglia (also called the semilunar ganglia) is a sensory ganglion equivalent in histological structure and function to a dorsal root ganglion. The cell bodies of the afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve reside in this ganglion.

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  • 16. 

    Which of the following structures is located in the vestibule of the oral cavity?

    • A.

      Tongue

    • B.

      Opening of the parotid duct

    • C.

      Opening of the submandibular duct

    • D.

      Sublingual fold

    • E.

      Uvula

    Correct Answer
    B. Opening of the parotid duct
    Explanation
    The oral vestibule is the space in the mouth lying between the lips and the teeth. See Netter Plate 45 for an illustration of the mouth and vestibule--although the vestibule isn't labeled, you can get some idea of where it lies. You can also see that the parotid duct is opening into this space . The parotid duct drains the parotid gland; it crosses the masseter to enter the cheek and drain into the oral cavity. The parotid duct drains into the cheek near the upper 2nd molar tooth.
    The tongue is not in the vestibule--it's behind the teeth. The submandibular duct opens into the area under the tongue, near the tongue's frenulum. The sublingual fold is also underneath the tongue; this is the fold that contains the openings for the ducts of the sublingual gland to drain into the mouth. The uvula is the "punching bag" hanging from the soft palate at the back of the oral cavity.

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  • 17. 

    When one presses the tongue tip against the anterior (incisor) teeth, which of the following muscles must contract?

    • A.

      Styloglossus

    • B.

      Hyoglossus

    • C.

      Genioglossus

    • D.

      Superior longitudinal

    • E.

      Verticalis

    Correct Answer
    C. Genioglossus
    Explanation
    Genioglossus is a large, fan shaped muscle with many actions: its inferior fibers protrude the tongue, its middle fibers depress the tongue, and its superior fibers draw the tip back and down. So, since the tongue is being protruded, the inferior fibers of genioglossus must be contracting. Styloglossus retracts and elevates the tongue. Hyoglossus depresses the sides of tongue and retracts the tongue. The superior longitudinal and verticalis muscles are intrinsic muscles of the tongue. They help shape the tongue for speech and chewing. All of these muscles are innervated by the hypoglossal nerve!

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  • 18. 

    The muscle responsible for raising the floor of the mouth in the early stages of swallowing is the:

    • A.

      Genioglossus

    • B.

      Geniohyoid

    • C.

      Hyoglossus

    • D.

      Mylohyoid

    • E.

      Palatoglossus

    Correct Answer
    D. Mylohyoid
    Explanation
    The mylohyoid muscle elevates the hyoid bone and the tongue and depresses the mandible. It is a muscle in the floor of the mouth that helps elevate the floor of the mouth, so this is the correct answer. The genioglossus is a large, fan shaped tongue muscle that protrudes tongue with its inferior fibers and depresses the tongue with its middle fibers. Geniohyoid is a small muscle in the floor of the mouth that elevates the hyoid and depresses the mandible. Hyoglossus is a tongue muscle that depresses the sides of the tongue and retracts the tongue. Finally, palatoglossus is a palate muscle, innervated by the vagus nerve. It elevates and retracts the tongue.

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  • 19. 

    The cell bodies of the postganglionic parasympathetic neurons innervating the sublingual gland are found in which of the following ganglia?

    • A.

      Ciliary

    • B.

      Otic

    • C.

      Submandibular

    • D.

      Superior cervical

    • E.

      Trigeminal

    Correct Answer
    C. Submandibular
    Explanation
    The submandibular ganglion contains the cell bodies of the postganglionic parasympathetic neurons that innervate the sublingual and submandibular gland. Preganglionic parasympathetic fibers arrived at the submandibular ganglion via the chorda tympani. These neurons then synapsed with the cell bodies in the submandibular ganglion, and the postganglionic fibers traveled out to provide secretomotor innervation to the sublingual and submandibular glands.
    The ciliary ganglion receives preganglionic parasympathetic fibers from the inferior division of the oculomotor nerve. The postganglionic fibers from this ganglion leave via short ciliary nerves and innervate sphincter pupillae and the ciliary muscle of the eye. Also remember that sensory and sympathetic fibers are passing through the ciliary ganglion and distributing on the short ciliary nerves, but these fibers never synapse in that ganglion. The otic ganglion is the ganglion where parasympathetic fibers synapse before innervating the parotid gland. The lesser petrosal nerve is a branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) that carries presynaptic parasympathetic fibers to the otic ganglion. These fibers synapse in the otic ganglion, and the postsynaptic fibers travel on the auriculotemporal nerve to the parotid gland.
    The superior cervical ganglia is at the level of the C1 and C2 vertebrae--it is the highest ganglia in the sympathetic chain. Sympathetic nerves from this ganglia go to form the internal carotid sympathetic plexus along the internal carotid artery. Finally, the trigeminal ganglia (also called the semilunar ganglia) a sensory ganglion equivalent in histological structure and function to a dorsal root ganglion. The cell bodies of the afferent fibers of the trigeminal nerve reside in this ganglion.

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  • 20. 

    A 46-year-old female patient comes to the emergency department complaining of pain in the area just below her mandible on the right side of her face. She says that the pain is particularly severe when she eats. The area of the submandibular gland is tender and swollen, as is the area in the floor of her mouth lateral to the tongue. You suspect a stone in the submandibular duct, and a plain film radiograph shows a density in that region consistent with a stone. In order to remove the stone, the duct must be incised in the floor of the mouth. What nerve, that loops around the duct, is in danger in such an incision?

    • A.

      Chorda Tympani

    • B.

      Glossopharyngeal

    • C.

      Hypoglossal

    • D.

      Internal branch of the superior laryngeal

    • E.

      Lingual

    Correct Answer
    E. Lingual
    Explanation
    The lingual nerve is found in the floor of the mouth--it wraps around the submandibular duct. So that nerve might be injured as you try to remove the stone from the submandibular duct. The lingual nerve contains general sensory fibers for the anterior 2/3 of the tongue, and fibers from the chorda tympani that provide taste to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue. All of these sensory components might be lost if the lingual nerve was damaged.
    At the point where the lingual nerve is wrapping around the submandibular gland, the fibers from chorda tympani have already joined the lingual nerve.This means that fibers from chorda tympani might be damaged, but the chorda tympani itself is not near the submandibular duct. The glossopharyngeal nerve provides sensory and taste innervation to the posterior 1/3 of the tongue and sensory innervation to the pharynx--it is not associated with the submandbular duct. The hypoglossal nerve is in the sublingual space, just like the submandibular duct. However, it is deeper in the sublingual space and does not wrap around the duct. Remember--the lingual nerve is a much more superficial structure in the sublingual space. Finally, the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve crosses the thyrohyoid membrane to provide sensory innervation to the mucosa of the pharynx, superior to the vocal folds.

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  • 21. 

    In accessing the submandibular gland in the submandibular triangle, what vessel coursing through the gland and triangle would need to be protected?

    • A.

      External jugular vein

    • B.

      Facial artery

    • C.

      Maxillary artery

    • D.

      Retromandibular vein

    • E.

      Superior thyroid artery

    Correct Answer
    B. Facial artery
    Explanation
    The submandibular triangle is formed by the lower border of the mandible and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric muscle. The facial artery and facial vein course through this triangle. The facial artery lies deep to the superficial part of the submandibular gland and wraps around the mandible. The facial vein is superficial to the gland--see Netter Plate 27 for a picture. The external jugular vein is a superficial vein on the lateral side of the neck. The maxillary artery is a branch of the external carotid artery that is the main source of blood to the infratemporal fossa. The retromandibular vein is a vein that passes through the parotid gland, along with the facial artery and facial nerve. Finally, the superior thyroid artery is a branch of the external carotid that supplies blood to the superior pole of the thyroid.

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  • 22. 

    All of the following may be found in the paralingual space EXCEPT:

    • A.

      Hypoglossal nerve

    • B.

      Lingual nerve

    • C.

      Sublingual gland

    • D.

      Submandibular gland duct

    • E.

      Superficial lobe of the submandibular gland

    Correct Answer
    E. Superficial lobe of the submandibular gland
    Explanation
    The paralingual space is found in the floor of the mouth, deep to the mylohyoid muscle. The space is bounded by the lateral tongue, the hyoid bone, and the oral mucosa. Remember--the submandibular gland has a deep and superficial portion. The deep portion of the submandibular gland is found deep to the mylohyoid muscle, while the superficial portion of the submandibular gland is found superficial to the mylohyoid muscle. So, the deep portion of the submandibular gland is in the paralingual space, while the superficial portion of the submandibular gland is not. See Netter Plate 55 for a picture of this.
    The paralingual space also contains the submandibular duct and sublingual caruncle, the lingual nerve and submandibular ganglion, the hypoglossal nerve, and the sublingual gland and fold.

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  • Mar 21, 2023
    Quiz Edited by
    ProProfs Editorial Team
  • Jan 18, 2012
    Quiz Created by
    Chachelly
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