Time To Improve Your English Skills! Adjectives Out Of Order

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Time To Improve Your English Skills! Adjectives Out Of Order - Quiz

They are adjectives placed out of order. Meaning, they come before the noun rather than after. Why Use Them? Adjectives shifted out of order aid in enriching the text and altering the rhythm without overloading the description or sentence.
Decide whether the following sentences are examples of an ADJECTIVE OUT OF ORDER brush stroke, a PARTICIPLE brush stroke, or NEITHER.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 

    Gabe, annoyed and cold, looked for the raven.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    A. Adjective out of Order
    Explanation
    'annoyed and cold' are ADJECTIVES that describe Gabe

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  • 2. 

    The ram, frightened and angry, prepared to charge.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    A. Adjective out of Order
    Explanation
    'frightened and angry' are ADJECTIVES that describe Gabe

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  • 3. 

    Raymond was panting, coughing, and wheezing.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    C. Neither
    Explanation
    A 'brush stroke' is added to a complete sentence to add a stronger mental picture. When it is taken away, a complete sentence should still be there. If 'panting, coughing, and wheezing' are taken out of the sentence, it is no longer a complete sentence.

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  • 4. 

    Squinting, Gabe tried to see the shape in front of him. 

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    B. Participle
    Explanation
    'Squinting' is an -ing word added to a complete sentence. The participle is separated from the sentence with a comma.

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  • 5. 

    Soaked and frozen, Gabe tried to thaw out after falling in the water.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    A. Adjective out of Order
    Explanation
    'soaked and frozen' are ADJECTIVES that describe Gabe

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  • 6. 

    Howling through the trees, the wind sounded spooky.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    B. Participle
    Explanation
    'Howling through the trees' is an -ing phrase added to a complete sentence. The participle is separated from the sentence with a comma.

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  • 7. 

    The bloody, wounded moose bravely faced the wolves. 

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    C. Neither
    Explanation
    'bloody, wounded' are just normal adjectives. They are not used out of order

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  • 8. 

    Slipping, sliding, and crowing, the raven slid down the hill on its back.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    B. Participle
    Explanation
    'slipping, sliding, and crowing' are -ing words added to a complete sentence. The participle is separated from the sentence with a comma.

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  • 9. 

    Sensing movement behind him, Raymond looked over his shoulder. 

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    B. Participle
    Explanation
    'Sensing movement behind him' is an -ing phrase added to a complete sentence. The participle is separated from the sentence with a comma.

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  • 10. 

    The northern lights, bright and ghostly, danced in the night sky.

    • A.

      Adjective out of Order

    • B.

      Participle

    • C.

      Neither

    Correct Answer
    A. Adjective out of Order
    Explanation
    'bright and ghostly' are ADJECTIVES that describe the northern lights

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