Figures Of Speech MCQ Trivia Questions With Answers

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Rachel Pietrzak
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 84,652
Questions: 15 | Viewed: 84,666

1.

My teacher has eyes in the back of her head.

Answer: Idiom
Explanation:
The expression "My teacher has eyes in the back of her head" is an idiom. Idioms are phrases that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. In this case, it doesn't mean that the teacher literally has eyes in the back of her head, but rather that she is very observant or seems to be aware of everything happening around her.
2.

Her hair was like gravy, running brown off her head and clumping up on her shoulders.

Answer: Simile
Explanation:
The sentence "Her hair was like gravy, running brown off her head and clumping up on her shoulders" is an example of a simile. A simile is a figure of speech that compares two unlike things using the words "like" or "as." In this case, the comparison is between her hair and gravy, suggesting a similarity in texture or appearance.
3.

There was a loud "THUMP" coming from downstairs. "THUMP, THUMP, THUMP!"

Answer: Onomatopoeia
Explanation:
Onomatopoeia is a figure of speech where words mimic the sounds they describe. The word "THUMP" in this context imitates the sound of something heavy hitting a surface. Repeating "THUMP, THUMP, THUMP!" emphasizes the noise and makes the description more vivid and engaging for the reader. Onomatopoeic words help bring a sense of realism and auditory experience to the text.
4.

The phone rang loudly. "RING, RING, RING!"

Answer: Onomatopoeia
Explanation:
Onomatopoeia refers to words that phonetically imitate the sounds they describe. In this sentence, "RING, RING, RING!" mimics the sound of a phone ringing. This use of onomatopoeia helps to convey the auditory experience of the phone ringing loudly, making the description more vivid and engaging for the reader.
5.

Her cheeks are big red apples from the cold. 

Answer: Metaphor
Explanation:
The sentence "Her cheeks are big red apples from the cold" is an example of a metaphor. A metaphor is a figure of speech that implies a comparison between two unlike things by stating that one thing is another. In this case, it suggests that her cheeks resemble big red apples due to the cold, emphasizing their redness and perhaps roundness as a visual comparison.
6.

Life is like a box of chocolate. You never know what your going to get.

Answer: Simile
Explanation:
The statement "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get" is an example of a metaphor. This famous line from the movie "Forrest Gump" implies a comparison between life and a box of chocolates to convey the idea that in life, as in a box of chocolates, you don't know what each experience or moment will bring.
7.

The leaves danced in the wind.

Answer: Personification
Explanation:
Personification gives human characteristics to objects that are not human. Leaves do NOT really dance in the wind. However, this gives the reader an image of leaves blowing gracefully on a windy day.
8.

It's time to hit the road!

Answer: Idiom
Explanation:
The phrase "It's time to hit the road!" is an example of an idiom. Idioms are expressions whose meanings cannot be deduced from the literal definitions of the individual words. In this context, "hit the road" is an idiomatic expression meaning to begin a journey or leave a place.
9.

The sun kissed my cold face.

Answer: Personification
Explanation:
The phrase "The sun kissed my cold face" is an example of personification. Personification is a figure of speech in which human characteristics are attributed to non-human entities or objects. In this case, the sun is described as "kissing" the face, attributing human-like qualities to the sun.
10.

He's as cute as a button.

Answer: Simile
Explanation:
The phrase "He's as cute as a button" is an example of a simile. A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things using the words "like" or "as." In this case, it directly compares the person's cuteness to the small size and charm associated with buttons.
11.

He fought like a lion in the war.

Answer: Simile
Explanation:
The sentence "He fought like a lion in the war" is an example of a simile. Similes involve comparing two unlike things using the words "like" or "as." In this case, the comparison suggests that the person's fighting style is similar to that of a lion, conveying strength, bravery, or fierceness.
12.

A blessing in disguise

Answer: Idiom
Explanation:
The expression "A blessing in disguise" is an idiom. Idioms are phrases that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. In this case, the phrase suggests that something initially perceived as a problem or misfortune may actually turn out to be advantageous or beneficial in the end.
13.

Better late than never

Answer: Idiom
Explanation:
The expression "Better late than never" is an idiom. Idioms are phrases that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. In this case, the idiom conveys the idea that it's preferable for something to happen late than not happen at all.
14.

He is as strong as an ox.

Answer: Simile
Explanation:
The expression "He is as strong as an ox" is a simile. Similes involve comparing two different things using the words "like" or "as." In this case, the comparison suggests that the person's strength is similar to that of an ox, emphasizing their physical power.
15.

Lion is the king of the jungle.

Answer: Metaphor
Explanation:
The statement "Lion is the king of the jungle" is an example of a metaphor. A metaphor is a figure of speech that implies a comparison between two unlike things by stating that one thing is another. In this case, the metaphor suggests that the lion is like a king in the jungle, symbolizing its dominance and authority.
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