Person Centered Planning 1 Quiz

8 Questions  I  By Ccss
note: this training is an overview of person-centered planning. IT is intended to provide a basic understanding of person-centered planning guidelines and practices for all employees, and meet the carf accredITation standards for training for all employees. IT is not intended to be a substITute for competency-based training requirements. please read through this brief overview on person-centered planning. after completing this overview, complete the questionnaire that follows. this questionnaire is intended to improve your understanding of the concept of person-centered planning. � person centered planning overview the term person-centered planning became common by the mid-1980's in the human service field. person-centered-planning, or pcp, refers to an entire array of approaches to organizing and guiding individual and communITy change in collaboration wITh individuals wITh disabilITies, their families, and their friends. pcp requires personal, professional, and communITy support. person-centered planning involves the development of a "toolbox" of methods and resources that enable people wITh disabilITies to choose their own paths to success. professionals providing services help them figure out where they want to go and how best to get there. person-centered planning empowers people who request and receive human services to develop for themselves the definITion of a desirable, meaningful, and successful present and future. IT encourages people who deliver services to learn and to grow alongside the person, who is at the core of the planning process. IT was "invented" in an effort to influence the way in which the systems that provide services respond to the requests and desires of the person served. person-centered planning is focused on removing the artificial boundaries wIThin communITies, facilITating growth, and success for individuals who have often been disenfranchised, and implementing changes wIThin our society and the culture that allow for the inclusion of all ITs members. "pcp is characterized by seeing people first rather than relating to diagnostic labels; using ordinary language and images rather than professional jargon; actively searching for a person's gifts and capacITies in the context of communITy life; and strengthening the voice of the person and those who know the person best in accounting for their history, evaluating their present condITions in terms of valued experiences, and defining desirable changes in their lives." (mount, 1992). some of the common approaches to person-centered planning include: whole life planning; personal futures planning; making action plans (maps); planning alternative tomorrows wITh hope (path); and essential lifestyles planning. � key characteristics of person-centered planning: 1. the person who is at the focus of the planning, and those who love the person, are the primary authorITies on the person's life direction. 2. the primary purpose of pcp is to learn through shared action (i.e., the process is more than producing paperwork, IT is about taking action to reach goals), and reflection/evaluation of that action. 3. pcp aims to change common patterns of communITy life (e.g., segregation and congregation of people wITh disabilITies, devaluing stereotypes, inappropriately low expectations, denial of opportunITy). 4. pcp requires collaborative action and fundamentally challenges practices that separate people and perpetuate controlling relationships. 5. respect for the dignITy and completeness of the focus person. 6. pcp calls for a sustained search for the effective ways to deal wITh difficult barriers and conflicting demands. 7. pcp promotes and values accurate individual services, and supports and clarifies individual interests and needs. 8. pcp is focused on shaping services to support a person's vision of a valued lifestyle. 9. pcp facilITates change in services to be more responsive to the interests of people. 10. pcp searches for capacITies rather than incapacITies. 11. pcp has ITs focus on qualITy of life and emphasizes dreams, desired outcomes, and meaningful experiences. organizations that embrace person-centered planning believe in the following values and practices: 1) incorporate into policy and practice the recognITion that the family and significant others are the constant in the life of the person served, while the service system and support persons fluctuate. 2) strive for client, family and professional collaboration in all settings (home, communITy, hospITal, school, etc), especially in the areas of care giving, program development, program implementation, program evaluation, program evolution, and policy formulation. 3) exchange complete and unbiased information between persons served and professionals in a supportive manner at all times. 4) incorporate into policy and practice the recognITion and honoring of cultural diversITy, strengths, and individualITy wIThin and across all client groups, including ethnic, racial, spirITual, social, economic, educational, and geographic diversITy. 5) recognize and respect different methods of coping. 6) implement comprehensive policies and programs that provide developmental, educational, emotional, environmental, and financial supports that meet the diverse needs of clients. 7) encourage peer-to-peer support and networking among persons served. 8) ensure that all service and support systems for persons served wITh disabilITies and their families are flexible, accessible, and comprehensive in responding to diverse identified needs. 9) appreciate all persons served, recognizing that they possess a wide range of strengths, concerns, emotions, and aspirations beyond their need for specialized services and supports.

  
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1.  The person being served and those who love the person are the primary authorities with regard to the person's life direction, not the professional providing services.
A.
B.
2.  Assessment in a PCP approach must focus carefully on an individual's incapacities/disabilities in order to set appropriate goals and objectives.
A.
B.
3.  The professional developing the person-centered plan focuses exclusively on the person served in regards to intervention and advocacy.
A.
B.
4.  Peer-to-peer support and networking among persons served is discouraged in person-centered planning in order to foster independence and self-reliance.
A.
B.
5.  Professionals embracing person-centered-planning exclude family, care givers, and significant others from planning and goal setting to avoid undue influence of unhealthy patterns of behavior that have contributes to the problems of the person served.
A.
B.
6.  The appreciation of all persons served, recognizing that they possess a wide range of strengths, concerns, emotions, and aspirations beyond their need for specialized services and supports is an integral value of person-centered planning.
A.
B.
7.  Person-centered-planning requires specific, highly professional language.
A.
B.
8.  PCP is characterized by seeing people first rather than relating to diagnostic labels.
A.
B.
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