Civil Rights Movement Quiz

30 Questions  I  By Kcarter052
Please take the quiz to rate it.

Civil Rights Movement Quizzes & Trivia
Quiz #7. Civil rights movemnt. 2009. Yeah.

  
Changes are done, please start the quiz.


Questions and Answers

Removing question excerpt is a premium feature

Upgrade and get a lot more done!
  • 1. 
    In 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka case determined that
    • A. 

      All registered voters have a right to vote

    • B. 

      Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal and, therefore, unlawful

    • C. 

      All residents have a right to a college education

    • D. 

      Hiring in school’s must guarantee that no teacher will be discriminated against by race


  • 2. 
    Rodger Streitmatter, as do many historians, cites the Civil Rights Movement as
    • A. 

      A political movement that was spurred by extensive newspaper coverage

    • B. 

      Ill-timed, and would have been less violent if activists had waited a few years

    • C. 

      The first great television news story

    • D. 

      A political movement that was spurred by effective public relations techniques


  • 3. 
    NBC correspondent John Chancellor said that with respect to the Civil Rights Movement, journalism does not initiate social change, but journalism
    • A. 

      Can amplify social change

    • B. 

      Can destroy movements by overexposure

    • C. 

      Can set the record straight on who did what to whom

    • D. 

      Can exaggerate the impact of social activists


  • 4. 
    In the summer of 1957, African-American leaders targeted Central High School for desegregation with the enrollment of nine Black students. This took place in
    • A. 

      New Orlenas, La.

    • B. 

      Tupelo, Miss.

    • C. 

      Birmingham, Ala.

    • D. 

      Little Rock, Ark.


  • 5. 
    The above action is regarded as the first chapter of television’s epic coverage of the movement because
    • A. 

      It lead to a rapid change in school district policy on segregation

    • B. 

      It turned what otherwise would have been a local story into a national news story

    • C. 

      It was the first news story presented in full color, not just black and white

    • D. 

      It gave Martin Luther King a forum for his beliefs


  • 6. 
    The most dramatic image that emerged from the Central High School desegregation effort was
    • A. 

      The brutal treatment of a petite, 15-year-old Black girl by redneck segregationists

    • B. 

      The relative calm that greeted a young Black male student as he approached local police at the school

    • C. 

      The fire bomb that exploded on the school bus as the students entered the school

    • D. 

      The lynching by a mob of two of the nine students


  • 7. 
    The first time that Charlayne Hunter-Gault, later of the New York Times and a Public Broadcasting Service correspondent, made the news was when 
    • A. 

      She was one of the two African Americans first admitted to the Univ. of Georgia.

    • B. 

      She defied a court order to leave a lunch counter in a segregated cafe.

    • C. 

      She refused to ride in the back of a bus in Selma, Ala.

    • D. 

      She shot a White Southerner who tried to assault her


  • 8. 
    The racially mixed group of college students and civil rights activists who rode buses from the North into segregated Southern communities was known as
    • A. 

      Carpet baggers

    • B. 

      Abolitionists

    • C. 

      Freedom riders

    • D. 

      Justice journeyers


  • 9. 
    Police Commissioner “Bull” Connor held great influence over the town considered the most segregated city in America in the early 1960s. That city was 
    • A. 

      Tupelo, Miss

    • B. 

      Birmingham, Ala.

    • C. 

      Little Rock, Ark.

    • D. 

      New Orleans, La.


  • 10. 
    That same city became the target in 1963 for what one activist hoped would be a series of supposed nonviolent protests. The person was 
    • A. 

      Jesse Jackson

    • B. 

      Andrew Young

    • C. 

      Thurgood Marshall

    • D. 

      Martin Luther King


  • 11. 
    Media images of Bull Connor’s use of police dogs and high-pressure fire hoses to subdue protestors, many of them children, led to a reaction from the public elsewhere. They reacted by 
    • A. 

      Expressing embarrassment, but doing little else

    • B. 

      Flooding the White House with phone calls for action

    • C. 

      Organizing public marches of support in 40 cities around the country

    • D. 

      Calling their Congressional representatives, asking for federal intervention


  • 12. 
    A massive demonstration and march took place in August 1963 with some 200,000 protestors whose actions were televised by all three networks. That event took place
    • A. 

      Near Camp David where the President was staying

    • B. 

      In the nation's capital

    • C. 

      In New York City, the media capital of the country

    • D. 

      in Selma, Ala., in the heart of Dixie


  • 13. 
    It was during this same massive march that the Rev. Martin Luther King delivered his
    • A. 

      I’ve been to the mountaintop” speech

    • B. 

      "i have a dream" speech

    • C. 

      Last speech

    • D. 

      First televised speech


  • 14. 
    In the DVD we viewed, the Edmund Pettis Bridge that Martin Luther King and his demonstrators crossed was in 
    • A. 

      Jacksonville, Miss.

    • B. 

      Athens, Ga.

    • C. 

      Knoxville, Tenn.

    • D. 

      Selma, Ala.


  • 15. 
    In that same DVD, we saw the President sign into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. That President was
    • A. 

      Lyndon B. Johnson

    • B. 

      Richard Nixon

    • C. 

      Jimmy Carter

    • D. 

      John F. Kennedy


  • 16. 
    The other key piece of legislation that followed the Civil Rights Act was the
    • A. 

      Affirmative Action Act of 1966

    • B. 

      Equal Protection Act of 1965

    • C. 

      Voting Rights Act of 1965

    • D. 

      Faith, Family & Freedom Act of 1966


  • 17. 
    The United States’ initial involvement in Vietnam began
    • A. 

      In the late 1960s with Pres. Johnson

    • B. 

      In the late 1950s with Pres. Eisenhower

    • C. 

      In the early 1960s with Pres. Kennedy

    • D. 

      In the early 1950s with Pres. Truman


  • 18. 
    In 1954, Vietnam was divided in half. The north was
    • A. 

      Communist controlled and based in Hanoi

    • B. 

      Democratically controlled and based in Hanoi

    • C. 

      Democratically controlled and based in Saigon

    • D. 

      Communist controlled and based in Saigon


  • 19. 
    In 1964, North Vietnamese patrol boats fired on U.S. destroyers in a Vietnamese gulf location. This attack led to a Congressional action known as 
    • A. 

      The Viet Cong Retaliation Resolution

    • B. 

      The Port of Hanoi Resolution

    • C. 

      The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

    • D. 

      The Resolution of Vietnamese Sovereignty


  • 20. 
    By war’s end after more than 10 years, how many U.S. men and women died in the war?
    • A. 

      5,000

    • B. 

      8,000

    • C. 

      58,000

    • D. 

      1 to 3 million


  • 21. 
    By war’s end after more than 10 years, how many estimated Southeast Asians died in the war?
    • A. 

      5,000

    • B. 

      8,000

    • C. 

      58,000

    • D. 

      1 to 3 million


  • 22. 
    By 1972, two out of three U.S. citizens named which medium as their main source of news
    • A. 

      Television

    • B. 

      Magazines

    • C. 

      Newspapers

    • D. 

      Radio


  • 23. 
    Through 1967, most news coverage of the war was favorable. However, what event in 1968 turned the coverage into one that was more critical?
    • A. 

      The Tet Offensive

    • B. 

      The Hanoi bombing

    • C. 

      The Tonkin Offensive

    • D. 

      The Cu Chi firefight


  • 24. 
    The most controversial story of the early years of the war was by Morley Safer of CBS who covered events in the village of Cam Ne. That story showed
    • A. 

      American soldiers in full retreat after an ambush

    • B. 

      Bombers strafing rice paddies in the Mekong Delta

    • C. 

      American soldiers being shot at by Vietnamese children

    • D. 

      American soldiers burning down 150 houses by using their "Zippo" lighters


  • 25. 
    The Viet Cong offensive during their Lunar New Year holiday in 1968 was
    • A. 

      A military failure by U.S. troops

    • B. 

      A military failure by North Vietnam

    • C. 

      A military failure by South Vietnamese troops

    • D. 

      a military success for the Viet Cong


  • 26. 
    In effect, what the televised news about the above offensive did to U.S. policy was
    • A. 

      To give comfort to U.S. troops and their commanders to “stay the course”

    • B. 

      To damage peace negotiations between North and South Vietnamese

    • C. 

      To cause severe damage to the credibility of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration

    • D. 

      To bolster the resolve of the American public to win the war


  • 27. 
    One of the most shocking and enduring images of the brutality and senselessness of the war occurred on the streets of Saigon when a North Vietnamese prisoner was arrested. Recorded for television during the arrest was 
    • A. 

      The suicide bombing by the prisoner as he was taken before authorities

    • B. 

      The attack by citizens on the prisoner

    • C. 

      The escape of the prisoner without any resistance from his captors

    • D. 

      The execution of the prisoner by a point-blank shot to his head


  • 28. 
    The man who set the tone for television coverage after the cataclysmic New Year’s offensive by the North Vietnamese was “the most trusted man in America.” He was
    • A. 

      Chet Huntley

    • B. 

      David Halberstam

    • C. 

      Walter Cronkite

    • D. 

      David Brinkley


  • 29. 
    That same broadcaster’s negative assessment of the war at that point led Pres. Johnson to reassess his position. What did he decide to do?
    • A. 

      Not run for reelection

    • B. 

      Increase military funding for the war

    • C. 

      Seek the help of U.N. coalition forces

    • D. 

      Announce an impassioned plea for reelection in order to win the war


  • 30. 
    Contributing to the tone of news coverage was the report of an incident at the village of My Lai. What did news reports say?
    • A. 

      That U.S. soldiers had retreated, despite orders from company commanders to fight

    • B. 

      That U.S soldiers had destroyed the village and killed hundreds of civilians

    • C. 

      That children of the village were offered for sale to U.S. troops

    • D. 

      That U.S. soldiers had been given defective weapons and died defenseless in the village


Back to top

Removing ad is a premium feature

Upgrade and get a lot more done!
Take Another Quiz
We have sent an email with your new password.