What is the difference between Have Been and Has Been? - ProProfs Discuss
Topics
Products
Follow Us:

What is the difference between Have Been and Has Been?

Asked by Isa , Last updated: Jul 26, 2020

+ Answer
Request

3 Answers

E. Dixon

E. Dixon

Answered Jun 15, 2020

Have been is an adverb used to form the present perfect tense, and then followed by a present participle, which is the present continuous tense. This adverb means that an action is occurring continuously and has not yet been completed at this time.

For example, “ I have been going to the gym regularly” suggests that I have gone regularly to the gym, and I am continuing to go to the gym. It may also express a fact, which is a truth that does not alter in the present. Had been is following similar rules, but for the past perfect continuous tense, as opposed to present perfect.

In this instance, had does not change depending on the subject (whether it is singular or plural). It is always had. For example, “He had been in the news for pulling that stunt.” The action here was in the past, and it has now ended in the present.

 

M. Jabrowsky

M. Jabrowsky, Bank Manager, Ohio

Answered Jun 11, 2020

Have been and has been meaning the same thing. They are both used in the form of present perfect continuous. When a word is used in such a form, it means something in the past that has occurred is still going on. For "have been," it is not always used that way.

Sometimes it can be separated by another word. For example, "Have you been to the new store on Greenbriar Parkway"? Has been being almost always used in that context. An example of using has been in a sentence is "Joe has been so good in school that Mary took him to get ice cream."

 

M. Klose

M. Klose, Content Writer, Oakland

Answered Jun 11, 2020

Before you can understand the major differences between "have been" and "Has been," you must understand how they are used and what types of pronouns the two go with. For first-person pronouns, we have "I, me, mine," as its singular form, while “we, us, our,” and “ours," are the plurals for the first-person pronouns. All of these pronouns usually go with "have been."

For example, I have been expecting you since last week. Another example: we have been banned from taking part in the examination. For second-person pronouns have been being used mostly to form a present perfect continuous tense.

For example, you have been eating too much lately—however, the major difference between the two lies in their usage with third-person pronouns, for third-person singular pronouns such as “her, his, its, he, her, she, him,” "has been" should be used. However, for third-person plural pronouns such as them, theirs, they, etc. "Have been" should be used.

 

Search for Google images
Select a recommended image
Upload from your computer
Search for Google images
Select a recommended image
Upload from your computer
Search for Google images
Select a recommended image
Upload from your computer

Email Sent
We have sent an email to your address "" with instructions to reset your password.