What is the difference between "Shall" and "Will" in English Grammar? - ProProfs
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What is the difference between "Shall" and "Will" in English Grammar?

Asked by K. Tanaka on May 14, 2019

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3 Answers

B. Mclean

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B. Mclean
Sales Manager, MBA, Ewa

Answered on Jun 10, 2019

There are some people who are not too concerned about grammar who may become a bit confused about the use of will and shall. Will is normally used with second and third person pronouns such as you will, they will, and he will. Shall is normally used with first-person pronouns such as I.

One example of this is, “I shall return.” This can also be used for the pronoun “we” as this is also a first-person pronoun. Shall is also used in order to show that it might happen in the future but there is no actual date when it will actually occur.

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E. Good

E. Good

Answered on May 30, 2019

The East Coast and West Coast are terms used to describe the Eastern coastal states and Western coastal states of the United States. In English Grammar, “shall” and “will” are used separately. Will and shall are verbs used to represent the future (to form future tenses). The traditional rules for forming the future tense with “shall” when the subject is first person singular or first person plural.

Example of this: “I shall be in the meeting soon” or “We shall be there soon.” The traditional rules for forming future tense with “will” is when the subject is the second or third person singular or plural – you, he, she, it, and they. For example: “They will come for the meeting.” “She will be at the event.” “You will be in charge of the meeting.”

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C. Snow

I am a well trend Motivational speaker at California.

C. Snow
Motivator, MA, California

Answered on May 22, 2019

In English Grammar, “shall” and “will” are used separately. Will and shall are verbs used to represent the future (to form future tenses). The traditional rules for forming the future tense with “shall” when the subject is first person singular or first person plural. Example of this: “I shall be in the meeting soon” or “We shall be there soon” The traditional rules for forming future tense with “will” is when the subject is the second or third person singular or plural – you, he, she, it, and they. For example: “They will come for the meeting”. “She will be at the event”. “You will be in charge of the meeting”.

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