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What is an electron bubble?

Asked by M. Jabrowsky, Last updated: Dec 18, 2019

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Bergeront Tiffney

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Bergeront Tiffney, Computer Engineer, M. Tech, Southeast Montgomery

Answered Sep 24, 2019

An electron bubble is known to be the empty space that can be found in a free electron. The electron bubble is commonly very small that they cannot be seen easily. It is said that electron bubbles may form depending on different situations. For example, for helium, electron bubbles may form when the temperature form below the usual temperature wherein helium is supposed to flow freely.

When the temperature is changed, helium does not flow freely anymore. Rather, it would form different electron bubbles so that it will be covered. The change of temperature may cause a difference in image charge which will contribute to the formation of electron bubbles. Formation of electron bubbles may also occur in other atoms.

 

John F. connor

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John F. connor, Content Marketing executive, MA, Minsk,Poland

Answered Feb 08, 2019

Electron bubbles are the area around an electron. This area is empty and the electron is free. These electrons are found in cryogenic gas or liquid. Examples of cryogenic gas is helium and examples of cryogenic liquid is neon. Electrons are known for moving freely about. The kinetic theory explains how this is possible for electrons to do this. This only occurs at room temperature.

Electron bubbles are the area around an electron. This area is empty and the electron is free.

If the temperature is not at room temperature but it is lower or higher than room temperature, the movement of the electrons changes. Actually, due to these facts then the electron bubble theory was created. Actually, when the electrons are placed inside of the electron bubbles that are within helium, the electrons move slower than what you would think.

 

G. Roland

G. Roland, Professor, Austin

Answered Jan 24, 2019

In a cryogenic gas or liquid, such as neon or helium, an electron bubble is the empty space around a free electron. Electron bubbles are very small, measuring approximately 2nm in diameter when at atmospheric pressure. There is also theoretical probability that a 2s electron bubble exists. This type of bubble has a spherical wave function but the shape when stable is nonspherical. The 2S electron bubble is supposed to reflect a unique morphological instability when placed under intense, ambient pressure.

In a cryogenic gas or liquid, such as neon or helium, an electron bubble is the empty space around

The electron bubble theory was developed when it was realized that below a certain temperature, the mobility of electrons drops drastically. Otherwise, in noble gasses at room temperature, typically electrons move about freely. That is why at such low temperatures, electrons actually do not move about freely and they form small ‘bubbles’ around themselves instead. The size of an electron bubble varies according to three main factors. Those factors are: the amount of confinement, surface tension, and pressure-volume.

 

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