Ch. 14-16 Test In APUSH

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  • 1. 
    Life on the frontier was
    • A. 

      Fairly comfortable for women but not for men.

    • B. 

      Downright grim for most pioneer families

    • C. 

      Free of disease and premature death.

    • D. 

      Rarely portrayed in popular literature.

    • E. 

      Based on tight-knit communities.


  • 2. 
    All of the following gave rise to a more dynamic, market-oriented, national economy in early nineteenth-century America except
    • A. 

      The push west in search of cheap land. government regulation of all major economic industry. a vast number of European immigrants settling in the cities. the push west in search of cheap land

    • B. 

      Government regulation of all major economic industry.

    • C. 

      A vast number of European immigrants settling in the cities

    • D. 

      Newly invented machinery

    • E. 

      Better roads, faster steamboats, far-reaching canals, far spread roads


  • 3. 
     In early-nineteenth-century America,
    • A. 

      The annual population growth rate was much higher than in colonial days.

    • B. 

      The urban population was growing at an unprecedented rate.

    • C. 

      The birthrate was rapidly declining

    • D. 

      The death rate was increasing

    • E. 

      The center of population moved northward


  • 4. 
    The dramatic growth of American cities between 1800 and 1860
    • A. 

      Led to a lower death rate.

    • B. 

      Contributed to a decline in the birthrate.

    • C. 

      Resulted in unsanitary conditions in many communities

    • D. 

      Forced the federal government to slow immigration.

    • E. 

      Created sharp political conflict between farmers and urbanites


  • 5. 
    Ireland’s great export in the 1840s was
    • A. 

      People.

    • B. 

      Potatoes.

    • C. 

      Wool.

    • D. 

      Whiskey. whiskey

    • E. 

      Music


  • 6. 
    The Irish immigrants to early nineteenth-century America
    • A. 

      Were mostly Roman Catholics and hated the British

    • B. 

      Tended to settle on western farmlands

    • C. 

      Were warmly welcomed by American workers.

    • D. 

      Identified and sympathized with free American blacks.

    • E. 

      Were often members of the Irish Republican Army.


  • 7. 
    Native-born Protestant Americans distrusted and resented the Irish mostly because these immigrants
    • A. 

      Were poor

    • B. 

      Were thought to love alcohol

    • C. 

      Were Roman Catholic

    • D. 

      Frequently became police officers

    • E. 

      Were slow to learn English


  • 8. 
    When German immigrants came to the United States, they
    • A. 

      Often became Baptist or Methodists to escape nativism hatred.

    • B. 

      Mixed well with other Americans.

    • C. 

      Remained mostly in the Northeast.

    • D. 

      Prospered with astonishing ease.

    • E. 

      Dropped most of their German customs.


  • 9. 
    The sentiment of fear and opposition to open immigrant was called
    • A. 

      The cult of domesticity.

    • B. 

      Nativism

    • C. 

      Unitarianism

    • D. 

      “rugged individualism”

    • E. 

      “nationalistic patriotism”


  • 10. 
    Native-born Americans feared that Catholic immigrants to the United States would
    • A. 

      Want to attend school with Protestants.

    • B. 

      Overwhelm the native-born Catholics and control the church

    • C. 

      “establish” the Catholic church at the expense of Protestantism.

    • D. 

      Assume control of the “Know Nothing” party.

    • E. 

      Establish monasteries and convents in the west.


  • 11. 
    The “Father of the Factory System” in the United States was
    • A. 

      Robert Fulton

    • B. 

      Samuel F. B. Morse

    • C. 

      Eli Whitney

    • D. 

      Samuel Slater

    • E. 

      Thomas Edison


  • 12. 
    Eli Whitney was instrumental in the invention of the
    • A. 

      Steamboat

    • B. 

      Cotton gin

    • C. 

      Railroad locomotive

    • D. 

      Telegraph

    • E. 

      Repeating revolver


  • 13. 
    The underlying basis for modern mass production was the
    • A. 

      Cotton gin

    • B. 

      Musket

    • C. 

      Use of interchangeable parts

    • D. 

      Principle of limited liability

    • E. 

      Passing of protective tariffs


  • 14. 
    Match each individual with the correct invention. A) Samuel Morse    1. Telegraph B) Cyrus McCormick    2. Mower-reaper C) Elias Howe    3: Steamboat D) Robert Fulton    4: Sewing machine
    • A. 

      Samuel Morse 1. Telegraph

    • B. 

      Cyrus McCormick 2. Mower-reaper

    • C. 

      Elias Howe 3: Steamboat

    • D. 

      Robert Fulton 4: Sewing machine


  • 15. 
    The American work force in the early nineteenth century was characterized by
    • A. 

      Substantial employment of women and children in factories.

    • B. 

      Strikes by workers that were few in number but usually effective. strikes by workers that were few in number but usually effective

    • C. 

      A general lengthening of the workday from ten to fourteen hours.

    • D. 

      Extensive political activity among workers.

    • E. 

      Reliance on the system of apprentices and masters.


  • 16. 
    In the case of Commonwealth verses Hunt, the supreme court of Massachusetts ruled that
    • A. 

      Corporations were unconstitutional.

    • B. 

      Labor unions were not illegal conspiracies

    • C. 

      Labor strikes were illegal, they violated the Fair Labor Acts.

    • D. 

      The Boston Associates employment of young woman and children in their factories was inhumane.

    • E. 

      The state could regulate factory wages and working conditions.


  • 17. 
    The “cult of domesticity”
    • A. 

      Gave women more opportunity to seem employment out of the home

    • B. 

      Resulted in more pregnancies for women

    • C. 

      Restricted women’s moral influence on the family.

    • D. 

      Glorified the traditional role of women as homemakers

    • E. 

      Was especially strong among rural women.


  • 18. 
    With the development of cash-crop agriculture in the trans-Allegheny West
    • A. 

      Subsistence farming became common. subsistence farming became common. subsistence farming became common

    • B. 

      Farmers began to support the idea of slave labor

    • C. 

      Farmers quickly faced mounting indebtedness.

    • D. 

      The South could harvest a larger crop.

    • E. 

      The issue of farm surpluses came to the forefront


  • 19. 
    The “canal era” of American history began with the construction of the
    • A. 

      Mainline Canal in Pennsylvania

    • B. 

      James River Canal beginning in Virginia.

    • C. 

      Wabash Canal in Indiana.

    • D. 

      Panama Canal

    • E. 

      Erie Canal in New York.


  • 20. 
     Compared with canals, railroads
    • A. 

      Were more expensive to construct

    • B. 

      Transported freight more slowly.

    • C. 

      Were generally safer.

    • D. 

      Were susceptible to weather delays

    • E. 

      Could be built almost anywhere.


  • 21. 
    As a result of the introduction of the cotton gin
    • A. 

      Fewer slaves were needed on plantations.

    • B. 

      Short-staple cotton lost popularity

    • C. 

      Slavery was reinvigorated.

    • D. 

      Thomas Jefferson predicted the gradual death of slavery.

    • E. 

      The African slave trade was legalized.


  • 22. 
    Members of the planter aristocracy
    • A. 

      Produced fewer front-rank statesmen than the North

    • B. 

      Dominated society and politics in the South

    • C. 

      Provided democratic rule in the South

    • D. 

      Promoted tax-supported public education

    • E. 

      Kept up developments in modern thought.


  • 23. 
    Plantation agriculture was wasteful largely because
    • A. 

      It relied mainly on artificial means to fertilize the soil

    • B. 

      It required leaving cropland fallow every other year.

    • C. 

      Excessive water was used for irrigation.

    • D. 

      It was too diversified, thus taking essential nutrients from the soil

    • E. 

      Its excessive cultivation of cotton despoiled good land.


  • 24. 
    Plantation mistresses
    • A. 

      Had little contact with slaves

    • B. 

      Primarily controlled male slaves

    • C. 

      Frequently supported abolitionism

    • D. 

      Commanded a sizable household staff of mostly female slaves

    • E. 

      Were almost universally loved by their slaves


  • 25. 
    Northern attitudes toward free blacks can best be described as
    • A. 

      Supporting their right to full citizenship.

    • B. 

      Disliking the race but liking individual blacks.

    • C. 

      Advocating black movement into the new territories

    • D. 

      Politically sympathetic but socially segregationist

    • E. 

      Disliking the individuals but liking the race


  • 26. 
    The profitable southern slave system
    • A. 

      Hobbled the economic development of the region as a whole

    • B. 

      Saw many slaves moving to the upper South.

    • C. 

      Led to the textile industry’s development in the South first

    • D. 

      Relied almost totally on importing slaves to meet the unquenchable demand for labor.

    • E. 

      Enabled the South to afford economic and educational progress.


  • 27. 
    Regarding work assignments, slaves were
    • A. 

      Given some of the most dangerous jobs

    • B. 

      Generally spared dangerous work

    • C. 

      Given the same jobs as Irish laborers

    • D. 

      Usually given skilled rather than menial jobs.

    • E. 

      Generally supervised in small groups.


  • 28. 
    Perhaps the slave’s greatest psychological horror, and the theme of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, was
    • A. 

      The enforced separation of slave families.

    • B. 

      Slaveowners’ frequent use of the whip

    • C. 

      The breeding of slaves

    • D. 

      Having to do the most dangerous work on the plantation.

    • E. 

      Forcible sexual assault by slaveowners


  • 29. 
    By 1860, life for slaves was most difficult in the
    • A. 

      Atlantic states of North and South Carolina.

    • B. 

      Deep South states of Georgia and Florida

    • C. 

      Territories of Kansas, Nebraska, and New Mexico.

    • D. 

      Upper South states of Virginia and Maryland.

    • E. 

      Newer states of Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana


  • 30. 
    All of the following were true of slavery in the South except that
    • A. 

      Slave life on the frontier was harder than that of life in the more settled areas.

    • B. 

      A distinctive African American slave culture developed.

    • C. 

      A typical planter had too much of his own prosperity riding on the backs of his slaves to beat them on a regular basis.

    • D. 

      By 1860 most slaves were concentrated in the “black belt” of the Deep South.

    • E. 

      Most slaves were raised in single unstable parent households.


  • 31. 
    Most slaves were raised
    • A. 

      Without the benefit of a stable home life.

    • B. 

      In stable two-parent households.

    • C. 

      Never knowing anything about their relatives.

    • D. 

      Not to display their African cultural roots.

    • E. 

      Without religion.


  • 32. 
    In the pre-Civil War South, the most uncommon and least successful form of slave resistance was
    • A. 

      Feigned laziness

    • B. 

      Sabotage of plantation equipment

    • C. 

      Running away.

    • D. 

      Armed insurrection

    • E. 

      Stealing food and other goods.


  • 33. 
    Which one of the following has least in common with the other four?
    • A. 

      Nat Turner

    • B. 

      David Walker

    • C. 

      John Quincy Adams

    • D. 

      Denmark Vesey

    • E. 

      Gabriel


  • 34. 
    The idea of recolonizing blacks back to Africa was
    • A. 

      Proposed by William Loyd Garrison

    • B. 

      Proposed as part of the 14th Amendment.

    • C. 

      Advocated by Frederick Douglass.

    • D. 

      Suggested by the African nation of Liberia

    • E. 

      Supported by the black leader Martin Delany.


  • 35. 
    Arrange the following in chronological order: the founding of the (A) American Colonization Society, (B) American Anti-Slavery Society, (C) Liberty party.
    • A. 

      A, B, C

    • B. 

      C, A, B

    • C. 

      B, C, A

    • D. 

      A, C, B

    • E. 

      C, B, A


  • 36. 
    William Loyd Garrison pledged his dedication to
    • A. 

      Shipping freed blacks back to Africa

    • B. 

      Outlawing the slave trade.

    • C. 

      Preventing the expansion of slavery beyond the South.

    • D. 

      Forming an antislavery political party.

    • E. 

      The immediate abolition of slavery in the South


  • 37. 
    Match each abolitionist below with his role in the movement.     Wendell Phillips    abolitionist martyr Frederick Douglass    black abolitionist Elijah P. Lovejoy    abolitionist golden trumpet William Lloyd Garrison    abolitionist newspaper publisher
    • A. 

      A-4, B-2, C-1, D-3

    • B. 

      A-1, B-4, C-2, D-3

    • C. 

      A-1, B-3, C-4, D-2

    • D. 

      A-2, B-1, C-4, D-3

    • E. 

      A-3, B-2, C-1, D-4


  • 38. 
    Many abolitionists turned to political action in 1840 when they backed the presidential candidate of the
    • A. 

      Free-Soil party.

    • B. 

      Republican party

    • C. 

      Know-Nothing party.

    • D. 

      Liberty party

    • E. 

      Anti-Mason party.


  • 39. 
    The voice of white southern abolitionism fell silent at the beginning of the
    • A. 

      1790s

    • B. 

      1820s.

    • C. 

      1830s

    • D. 

      1840s

    • E. 

      1850s


  • 40. 
    Those in the North who opposed the abolitionists believed that these opponents of slavery
    • A. 

      Were creating disorder in America

    • B. 

      Were defending the American way of life

    • C. 

      Deserved the right to speak freely.

    • D. 

      Had turned their backs on religion

    • E. 

      Were undermining fundamental American beliefs.


  • 41. 
    The deist faith embraced all of the following except
    • A. 

      The concept of original sin

    • B. 

      The reliance on reason rather then revolution

    • C. 

      Belief in supreme being

    • D. 

      Belief in human beings capacity for moral behavior

    • E. 

      Denial of the divinity of jesus


  • 42. 
    Deists like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin endorsed the concept of
    • A. 

      Revelation

    • B. 

      Original sin

    • C. 

      The deity of christ

    • D. 

      A supreme being who created the universe

    • E. 

      the imminent end of the world


  • 43. 
    By 1850, organized religion in America
    • A. 

      Retained the rigor of colonial religion

    • B. 

      Was ignored by 3/4 of the people

    • C. 

      Had lost some of its austere Calvinist rigor

    • D. 

      Had grown more conservative

    • E. 

      Had become tied to the upper class


  • 44. 
    All of the following are true of the second great awakening except that
    • A. 

      Resulted in the conversion of countless souls

    • B. 

      Encouraged a variety of humanitarian reforms

    • C. 

      Strengthened democratic denominations like the baptist and methodists

    • D. 

      Was a reaction against the growing liberalism in religion

    • E. 

      Was not as large as the first great awakening


  • 45. 
    Unitarians endorsed the concept of
    • A. 

      The deity of christ

    • B. 

      Original sin

    • C. 

      Salvation through good works

    • D. 

      Predestination

    • E. 

      He bible as the norm of doctrine


  • 46. 
    An early nineteenth century religious rationalists sect devoted to the rule of reason and free will was the
    • A. 

      Unitarians

    • B. 

      Seventh day adventists

    • C. 

      Methodists

    • D. 

      Mormons

    • E. 

      Roman catholics


  • 47. 
    Religious revivals of the second great awakening resulted in
    • A. 

      Little increase in church membership

    • B. 

      A strong religious influence in many areas of american life

    • C. 

      Surprisingly few humanitarian reforms

    • D. 

      Greater attention to church history and doctrine

    • E. 

      All of the above


  • 48. 
    As a revivalist preacher, charles grandison finney advocated
    • A. 

      Opposition to slavery

    • B. 

      A perfect christian kingdom on earth

    • C. 

      Opposition to alcohol

    • D. 

      Public prayer by women

    • E. 

      All of the above


  • 49. 
    The greatest of the revival preachers of the second great awakening was
    • A. 

      Joseph smith

    • B. 

      Horace greeley

    • C. 

      Carl Schurz

    • D. 

      Charles G Finney

    • E. 

      Angelina Grimke


  • 50. 
    The second great awakening tented to
    • A. 

      Promote religious diversity

    • B. 

      Reduce social class differences

    • C. 

      Blur regional class differences

    • D. 

      Discourage church membership

    • E. 

      Weaken women’s social position


  • 51. 
    The mormon religion originated in
    • A. 

      Utah

    • B. 

      New england

    • C. 

      Nauvoo, Illinois

    • D. 

      Ireland

    • E. 

      The “burned over district” of new york


  • 52. 
    The religious sects that gained most from the revivalism of the second great awakening were the
    • A. 

      Roman catholics and episcopalians

    • B. 

      Unitarians and adventists

    • C. 

      Methodists and baptists

    • D. 

      Congregationalists and presbyterians

    • E. 

      Lutherans and mennonites


  • 53. 
    The second great awakening tended to
    • A. 

      Widen the lines between classes and regions

    • B. 

      Open the episcopal and presbyterian churches to the poor

    • C. 

      Unite southern baptists and southern methodists against slavery

    • D. 

      Bring the more prosperous and conservative eastern churches into the revivalist camps

    • E. 

      Increase the influence of educated clergy


  • 54. 
    The original prophet of the mormon religion was
    • A. 

      Ralph Waldo emerson

    • B. 

      Brigham young

    • C. 

      Charles g finney

    • D. 

      The angel moroni

    • E. 

      Joseph smith


  • 55. 
    Which one of the following is least related to the other four
    • A. 

      Brigham young

    • B. 

      William miller

    • C. 

      The book of mormon

    • D. 

      Salt lake city

    • E. 

      Polygamy


  • 56. 
    One of the characteristics of the mormons that angered many non mormons was their
    • A. 

      Highly individualistic lifestyles

    • B. 

      Unwillingness to vote

    • C. 

      Refusal to take up arms and defend themselves

    • D. 

      Emphasis on cooperative or group effort

    • E. 

      Flirtation with foreign governments


  • 57. 
    Many of the denominational liberal arts colleges founded as a result of the second great awakening
    • A. 

      Were academically distinguished institutions

    • B. 

      Lacked much intellectual vitality

    • C. 

      Eventually gained tax supported status

    • D. 

      Offered a new nontraditional curriculum

    • E. 

      Opened their doors to catholic students


  • 58. 
    Tax supported public education
    • A. 

      Existed mainly for the wealthy

    • B. 

      Eliminated private and parochial education in the U.S.

    • C. 

      Began in the south as early as 1800

    • D. 

      Provided little opportunity for the poor

    • E. 

      Was deemed essential for social stability and democracy


  • 59. 
    In the first half of the 19th century tax supported schools were
    • A. 

      Chiefly available to educate the children of the poor

    • B. 

      Most in evidence in the south

    • C. 

      Continuously opposed by the wealthy, conservative whites

    • D. 

      Open only to tuition paying children of the well to do

    • E. 

      More academically demanding then private academies


  • 60. 
    Noah webster’s dictionary
    • A. 

      Had little impact until the twentieth century

    • B. 

      Helped to standardize the american language

    • C. 

      Was used to educate the 19th century slaves

    • D. 

      Came to the U.S. from Britain in the 1800’s

    • E. 

      Gave legitimacy to American slang


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