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Donald Trump Questions and Answers (Q&A)

Compared to other presidents, Donald Trump’s approval ratings is currently lower than other presidents. Every week, Trump’s rating decreases. There is a good chance that voters who voted for Hillary Clinton will vote for the Democratic candidate. There is also a good chance that voters who are not deemed Republican or Democratic may vote for the Democratic candidate due to President Trump’s ratings and problems that have occurred during his presidency. There is always a large percentage of voters in the United States who are not affiliated with either candidate.

Instead, they vote according to either the candidate or their platform during the campaign. These people who are not affiliated with either party may choose to vote for the Democratic candidate during the next election.

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DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals which is a program established by the Obama Administration in 2012 to allow minors who entered the United States and either entered or stayed in the country illegally to have a two-year renewable period of deferred action from being deported from the country. It protects these children from being immediately deported if they are picked up by any of the immigration officials.

There are approximately 800,000 individuals who signed up for the program since it was established. However, President Trump rescinded the program on September 05, 2017 through the Memorandum on Rescission of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. This decision came after he was pressured by several attorneys general who claimed that the program is illegal.

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The Trump administration has unveiled new travel restrictions on certain foreigners from Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen as a replacement to a central portion of its controversial travel ban signed earlier this year. The new restrictions on travel vary by country and include a phased-in approach beginning next month.

For the last three months, the administration used an executive order to ban foreign nationals from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the US unless they have a "bona fide" relationship with a person or entity in the country. Those nations included Iran, Syria, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, and Sudan.

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The ban, as we’ve said before, is quite likely legal and constitutional, given the wide latitude U.S. law gives the President to restrict foreign entry and immigration. But it is very bad policy, motivated more by arbitrary animus than by a sound rationale to protect the nation from terrorism. If that weren’t clear enough when President Trump first issued the supposedly urgent edict — prohibiting entry from seven and then six nations, none of whom had sent a single deadly terror attacker to our shores for the past 40 years — the intervening months underline its senselessness.

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When President Trump threatened to “totally destroy” North Korea and mocked its leader, Kim Jong-un, as “Rocket Man” in a speech on Tuesday at the United Nations General Assembly, the rhetorical retaliation from Pyongyang was inevitable. That Mr. Kim would call Mr. Trump a “mentally deranged U.S. dotard” on Friday was something more of a surprise.

The word “dotard” in particular sent people to the dictionary to look up the arcane put-down. Merriam-Webster noted that “dotard” comes from “dotage,” a word meaning “a state or period of senile decay marked by decline of mental poise and alertness.” It rhymes with goatherd.

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The new penalties seek to leverage the dominance of the U.S. financial system by forcing nations, foreign companies and individuals to choose whether to do business with the United States or the comparatively tiny economy of North Korea. U.S. officials acknowledged that like other sanctions, these may not deter North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s drive to threaten the United States with a nuclear weapon, but are aimed at slowing him down. Kim on Thursday reacted angrily to Trump's remarks and actions this week, calling the president a “mentally deranged U.S. dotard” and Trump's earlier speech at the U.N. “unprecedented rude nonsense.”

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President Donald Trump delivered Tuesday a doomsday warning to North Korea and mocked its young leader, a pugnacious escalation in rhetoric in a wide-ranging debut address to the United Nations, the world's foremost diplomatic body.

In blunt terms, Trump warned the US would "totally destroy North Korea" if forced to defend itself or its allies. He said while the US has "great strength and patience," its options could soon run out. Directly putting the country's leader on notice, Trump suggested Kim Jong Un could not survive an American attack.

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North Korea's Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho on Monday accused US President Donald Trump of declaring war on his country by tweeting over the weekend that North Korea "won't be around much longer." "Last weekend Trump claimed that our leadership wouldn't be around much longer and declared a war on our country," Ri said, according to an official translation of his remarks to reporters in New York.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said Monday that the US has not declared war on North Korea. "Frankly, the suggestion of that is absurd." Sanders said it is "never appropriate" to shoot down another nation's aircraft in international waters and the administration plans to continue to protect the area.

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It was on August 25, 2017 when President Donald Trump released his statement on Twitter on the eve of Hurricane Harvey. President Trump said, “I am pleased to inform you that I have just granted a full Pardon to 85 year old American patriot Sheriff Joe Arpaio. He kept Arizona safe!” His idea of granting pardon to Joe Arpaio was unclear days before he made the decision as he was quoted saying, “I won’t do it tonight because I don’t want to cause any controversy xxx I’ll make a prediction: I think he’s going to be just fine.” The White House stated that the President’s reason for granting pardon to Joe Arpaio was because of his “years of admirable service to our nation.”

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Trump’s eating habits tend to better reflect the life of a typical American than his policies do. He loves his fast food. He’ll eat McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, etc. It’s been noted that he’ll scrape the cheese and sauce off a pizza, and not eat the dough. Seriously, that’s how he likes to eat his pizza. His love of tacos has been well noted via posts on social media.


There isn’t much he doesn’t like. Though he loves fast food, he has stayed rather silent about Chipotle when claiming that fast food is among the safest food to eat. Wonder why? However, he doesn’t like taco trucks. What’s up with that? A taco truck is usually run by someone in the community - wait...

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