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"The Raven" And "Incident In A Rose Garden" Quiz

40 Questions
Gardening Quizzes & Trivia

This is Mrs. Mahone's quiz for her 9th grade Honors English class. It covers and formatively evaluates students' application of skills and concepts learned through reading two narrative poems: "The Raven" and "Incident in a Rose Garden". *Some questions borrowed from McDougal Littell as well as other internet resourses

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Back yard

    • B. 

      Basement

    • C. 

      House

    • D. 

      Study

  • 2. 
    "The Raven" takes place in the month of
    • A. 

      December

    • B. 

      January

    • C. 

      February

    • D. 

      November

  • 3. 
    The weather is
    • A. 

      Sunny, warm

    • B. 

      Snowing and cold

    • C. 

      Dark and dreary

    • D. 

      Bright and springlike

  • 4. 
    At what time does this story begin?
    • A. 

      In the late evening

    • B. 

      At Midnight

    • C. 

      At noon

    • D. 

      At dawn

  • 5. 
    At the opening of the poem, the speaker is
    • A. 

      Clearly unbalanced

    • B. 

      Reading books

    • C. 

      Quaffing nepenthe

    • D. 

      Expecting a late visitor

  • 6. 
    When he opens the door, after first hearing the tapping, he
    • A. 

      Stands at the open door for a long time looking into the dark

    • B. 

      Sees nothing is there and immediately closes the door

    • C. 

      Is beguiled into smiling when the raven walks in

    • D. 

      Thinks he sees the ghost of Lenore

  • 7. 
    The speaker first believes the Raven is there to
    • A. 

      Bring Lenore back to life

    • B. 

      Take him to Lenore in heaven

    • C. 

      Make him forget his sorrow about Lenore

    • D. 

      Take his beak from out his heart

  • 8. 
    At first, the speaker thinks the raven is
    • A. 

      A prophet

    • B. 

      A devil

    • C. 

      A bird

    • D. 

      A thing of evil

  • 9. 
    • A. 

      If he'll get to hold Lenore in heaven

    • B. 

      If the sainted angels are holding Lenore

    • C. 

      If his pain will be soothed

    • D. 

      If he will always be laden with Lenore

  • 10. 
    How does the speaker's state of mind change as "The Raven" progresses?
    • A. 

      He becomes more philosophical

    • B. 

      He becomes more depressed and desperate

    • C. 

      He becomes more loving

    • D. 

      He becomes more fearful

  • 11. 
    Of the following choices, which does the raven come to represent for the speaker?
    • A. 

      The raven represents Lenore and love

    • B. 

      The raven represents nature and storms

    • C. 

      The raven represent desperate hopelessness

    • D. 

      The raven represents evil

  • 12. 
    Which line basically means the fire flickered making shadows?
    • A. 

      "... each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor..."

    • B. 

      "...all my soul within me burning..."

    • C. 

      "...whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosoms core..."

    • D. 

      "...seraphim, whose footfalls tinkled on the tufted floor..."

  • 13. 
    Ravens were traditionally considered
    • A. 

      Large crows

    • B. 

      Evil omens

    • C. 

      Goddesses of wisdom

    • D. 

      Plutonian in nature

  • 14. 
    "Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!" This means --
    • A. 

      Don't leave any black smoke you were lying to me

    • B. 

      Don't leave a feather as a coin to curse me with

    • C. 

      Leave your feather covered soul lying on the floor

    • D. 

      Don't even leave behind a feather to remind me of the lie you told

  • 15. 
    "I betook myself to linking/Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore... meant in craoking 'Nevermore'..." (69-72) This means --
    • A. 

      He is took and is now connecting fancy yore together

    • B. 

      He is letting his imagination get the best of him as to the meaning of Nevermore

    • C. 

      He realizes he will never see Lenore again and she is lost to him forever

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 16. 
    "...what it utters is its only stock and store/Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster/Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore..." (62-64). These lines mean --
    • A. 

      It's the only word it knows, learned from a previous, miserable master

    • B. 

      It's the only store the master caught disasters from and the Raven brought it

    • C. 

      The Raven's previous mater caused it so many disastrous experiences

    • D. 

      The Raven brought stock from its previous master and it was a disaster

  • 17. 
    "...tell me truly, I implore -- / Is there -- is there balm in Gilead? -- tell me -- tell me, I implore!" (88-89). The narrator is asking
    • A. 

      Is there anything that can soothe my pain?

    • B. 

      Will I ever hold Lenore again in heaven?

    • C. 

      Tell me truly if I will find an ointment when I go to Gilead

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 18. 
    By the end of the poem, where does the speaker assume that the raven has come from?
    • A. 

      Hell; the underworld

    • B. 

      Eden or heaven

    • C. 

      The shores of a nearby sea

    • D. 

      The home of an unhappy master

  • 19. 
    "And the lamp-light o'er himstreaming throws his shadow on the floor;/And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor/Shall be lifted -- nevermore!" (106-107). Which statement is most true: The speaker...
    • A. 

      Regrets having walled Lenore up and leaving her for dead and will probably go insane

    • B. 

      Realizes the shadow of death and despair will always hang over his soul

    • C. 

      Knows the raven will never leave him and will always sit on the statue

    • D. 

      Knows that the raven sees inside of his soul and will tell about the murders he has committed

  • 20. 
    In the poem, the bust of Pallas is most probably intended to represent
    • A. 

      Death

    • B. 

      Sorrow

    • C. 

      Reason

    • D. 

      Romantic love

  • 21. 
    Match the word to its definition for the following:
    • A. beguiling
    • A.
    • B. dirge
    • B.
    • C. divining
    • C.
    • D. ominous
    • D.
    • E. respite
    • E.
  • 22. 
    Match the word to its correct definition for the following:
    • A. decorum
    • A.
    • B. discourse
    • B.
    • C. implore
    • C.
    • D. placid
    • D.
    • E. tempest
    • E.
  • 23. 
    Match the word to its correct definition for the following:
    • A. countenance
    • A.
    • B. pall
    • B.
    • C. undaunted
    • C.
    • D. volume
    • D.
    • E. pallid
    • E.
  • 24. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 25. 
    Repetition is a technique in which a sound, word, phrase, or line is repeated for emphasis.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 26. 
    Rhyme is the occurrence of similar or identical sounds at the end of two words. Different types of rhyme include internal rhyme and end rhyme.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 27. 
    Rhyme scheme
    • A. 

      Is a pattern of end rhymes in a poem

    • B. 

      Is noted by assigning a letter of the alphabet to each line

    • C. 

      Requires lines that rhyme be given the same letter in the alphabet

    • D. 

      All of the above

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 28. 
    "Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary..."(1). This line contains which of the following literary sound devices?
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Internal rhyme

    • C. 

      Repetition

    • D. 

      Answers A & C

    • E. 

      Answers A & B

  • 29. 
    "Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my door..." (16). This line contains an example of
    • A. 

      Repetition

    • B. 

      Rhyme

    • C. 

      Alliteration

    • D. 

      All of the above

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 30. 
    "Sir," I said , "or Madame, truly your forgiveness I implore... And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door..." (20, 22) *These two lines show an example of
    • A. 

      Internal rhyme

    • B. 

      External rhyme

    • C. 

      End rhyme

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 31. 
    The rhyme scheme throughout "The Raven" is
    • A. 

      ABCDDD

    • B. 

      ABCDEF

    • C. 

      AABBCC

    • D. 

      DBACCC

  • 32. 
    Plutonian Night, Palla, Gilead, are all examples of
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Allusions

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 33. 
    A brief summary for "Incident in a Rose Garden" is
    • A. 

      A gardener believes that "Death" has come for him when it has really come for his employer

    • B. 

      Two men think that the grim reaper is after them

    • C. 

      Death has come for an old man who still wants to "see California". He tells his master about this and then death goes after him instead

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 34. 
    The conflict in "Incident in a Rose Garden" is
    • A. 

      Man vs. man

    • B. 

      Man vs. society

    • C. 

      Man vs. omnipotent(unknown)

    • D. 

      Man vs. himself

  • 35. 
    Which literary device is being used in the following lines: "Thin as a scythe he stood there..." (6).
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 36. 
    Which literary device is being used in the following lines: "Sir, I encountered Death just now among the roses..." (4-5)
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 37. 
    "He had his black coat on/Black gloves, a broad black hat..." (8-9). These lines contain examples of which two literary sound devices?
    • A. 

      Alliteration and rhyme

    • B. 

      Repetition and rhyme

    • C. 

      Repetition and alliteration

    • D. 

      None of the above

  • 38. 
    At the end of the poem, Death's hand being referred to as "a cage of bone" suggests that
    • A. 

      The hand is deformed

    • B. 

      The hand is old, ashy, and raggedy; needs some lotion

    • C. 

      He wants to be friends with the man who owns the garden

    • D. 

      The hand may capture the person who shakes it

  • 39. 
    "... and his eyes lit up/With the pale glow of those lanterns..." (35-36). This comparison is a
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Personification

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 40. 
    "And there stood Death in the garden,/Dressed like a Spanish waiter..." This simile is comparing
    • A. 

      Death to the garden

    • B. 

      Death's appearance and a Spanish waiter

    • C. 

      The garden and the Spanish waiter

    • D. 

      Death's stance to the waiter's dress