Pat Practice Test

60 Questions  I  By Patadmin
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 Pat Practice Test
Program aptitude test (PAT) preparation. **This test is intended for preparation purpose only and not for any evaluation purpose. **The format is similar to PAT**Time :90 minutes**Format:Verbal Ability & Communication Skills:20 questions Logical Reasoning & Creative Problem Solving:10 questions Numerical Ability:20 questions Supporting Personality Traits:10 questions**Answers are provided at the end of test and also after each question.

  
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1.  From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. The Draft Proposals of the Commission ____ a shift of power from the centre to the states.
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D.
2.  From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. It is argued that the Indian security system is ____ only in ____ the less resourceful terrorist outfits.
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B.
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D.
3.  From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. A more rigorous research is needed to ___ how the new system of medicine works.
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B.
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D.
4.  From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. ‘Nature’ ____ that both success and failure are a part of life, in such a situation, it is best to remain ____ from the outcome.
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D.
5.  From the choices that follow, choose the one that best fills the blank(s) in the sentence. The existing unemployment, aggravated by the alarming addition of those who have lost their jobs, has only ____the situation and the serious moves to freeze the DA and violation of labour laws are ____ the fundamental rights of the workers and employees.
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6.  Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Ministers: Council
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7.  Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Radio: Camera
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D.
8.  Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Tepid : Hot
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D.
9.  Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Religion: Ritual
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10.  Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair.   Debate: Soliloquy
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11.  Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? What does the author talk about?
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B.
C.
D.
12.  Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? ‘The soul always hears an admonition’. The admonition is because of  
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B.
C.
D.
13.  Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? The author advises us to be as
A.
B.
C.
D.
14.  Directions for Questions (11 - 14):  Read the passage and answer the questions that follow. Why am I an Indian? I did not have any choice. I was born one. If the good Lord had consulted me on the subject, I might have chosen a country more affluent, less crowded, less censorious in matters of food and drink, unconcerned with personal equations and free of religious bigotry. Am I proud of being an Indian? I can’t really answer this one. I can scarcely take credit for the achievements of my forefathers. And I have little reason to be proud of what we are doing today. On balance, I would say, ‘No, I am not proud of being an Indian’. ‘Why don’t you get out and settle in some other country?’ Once again I have very little choice. All the countries I might like to settle in have restricted quotas for emigrants, most of them are whites and have a prejudice against colored people. In any case, I feel more relaxed and at home in India. I dislike many things in my country – mostly the government. I know the government is not the same thing as the country, but it never stops trying to appear in that garb. This is where I belong and this is where I intend to live and die. Of course, I like going abroad. Living is easier, wine and food is better, women more forthcoming – it’s more fun. However, I soon get tired of all those things and want to get back to my dung-heap and be among my loud-mouthed, sweaty, smelly countrymen. I am like my kinsmen in Africa and England and elsewhere. My head tells me it’s better to live abroad, my belly tells me it is more fulfilling to be in ‘phoren’ but my heart tells me ‘get back to India’. Each time I return home and drive through the stench of bare-bottomed defecators that line the road from Cruz airport to the city I ask myself, Breathes there the man with soul so dead who never to himself hath said This is my own, my native land? I can scarcely breathe, but I yell, ‘Yeah, this is my native land. I don’t like it, but I love it’. Are you an Indian first and a Punjabi or Sikh second? Or is it the other way round? I don’t like the way these questions are framed and if I am denied my Punjabi ness or my community tradition, I would refuse to call myself Indian. I am Indian, Punjabi and Sikh. And even so I have a patriotic kinship with one who says I am ‘Indian, Hindu and Haryanvi’ or ‘I am Indian, Moplah Muslim and Malayali.’ I want to retain my religious and linguistic identity without making them exclusive in anyway. I am convinced that in our guaranteed diversity is our strength as a nation. As son as you try to obliterate regional language in favor of one ‘national’ language or religion, in the name of some particular Indian credo, you will destroy the unity of the country. Twice was our Indian=ness challenged. In 1962 by the Chinese and in 1965 by the Pakistanis. Then despite our many differences of language, religion and faith, we rose as one to defend our country. In the ultimate analysis, it is the consciousness of frontiers that makes a nation. We have proved that we are one nation. What then is this talk about Indianising people who are already Indian? and has anyone any right to arrogate to himself the right to decide who is and who is not a good Indian? As understood from the passage, a genius is one
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B.
C.
D.
15.  Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pairZealous : Dilettante ::
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C.
D.
16.  Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Yolk : Protein ::
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B.
C.
D.
17.  Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Yam : Potato ::
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D.
18.  Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Deviant : Orthodox  : :
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D.
19.  Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.News report : Descriptive  : :
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20.  Select the choice that is most parallel to the key word pair.Minaret : Mosque  : :
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21.  There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
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D.
22.  There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
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B.
C.
D.
23.  There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
A.
B.
C.
D.
24.  There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
A.
B.
C.
D.
25.  There is a figure called "Sample". You have to imagine it in different positions. The sample figure is followed by four figures, which you need to mark as S or R. S = Same, if it resembles the turned-around position of the Sample Figure.  R = Reverse, if it resembles the turned-over position of the Sample figure. Select the right combination of positions of the 4 pictures by comparing them against the Sample.
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B.
C.
D.
26.  Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.There’s hardly a government left in the world, whether communist, socialist or free-market conservative, that isn’t openly or wishfully committed to a policy of ‘tough love’ towards it business sector. The ‘love’ is for business as benefactor: Governments now realized that business, and only business, can provide the jobs that provide the paychecks that provide government with the two things it needs to keep going – the tax money that pays for service, and a sense of prosperity that translates as votes. The ‘toughness’ is for business as beseecher: Governments, with a few exceptions, now realize that protecting business enterprises creates bloated companies unable to compete in global markets. In local markets it is like taking money (in higher prices and reduced choices) from consumers – a k.a. voters. Which of the following can be concluded from this paragraph?
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27.  Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.The Committee of Governmental Experts which worked out the model Provisions did not lose sight of the necessity of maintaining a proper balance between protection against abuses of expressions of folklore, on the one hand, and of the freedom and encouragement of further development and dissemination of folklore, on the other. The Committee took into account that expressions of folklore formed a living body of human culture which should not be stifled by very rigid protection. It also considered that any protecting system should be practicable and effective, rather than a system of imaginative requirements, unworkable in reality? Which of the following can be an inference drawn from this paragraph?
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28.  Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.As population continues to grow, it becomes necessary in due course of time to cultivate the land of still poorer quality – land of the third grade. In such a situation, the second grade land also yields rent while the first grade land yields still higher rent, being equal to the difference between the value of the produce raised in superior lands and that of the third grade land. If population continues to grow, the third grade land will also become a rent-land, fourth grade land taking the place of the marginal or no – rent land. Thus, the basic cause of the emergence and growth of rent can be traced to the growing difficulty of raising food to support the population which is constantly growing. Which of the following can be a continuation of this paragraph?
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29.  Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.Many existing computer networks are dedicated to providing remote access to a centralized computer facility from many terminals scattered over a wide geographical area. Such centralized or star networks may be one – level, with terminals on multipoint lines radiating from the central facility, or two – level, with terminals connected to regional concentrators, which in turn are linked to the central site. For switched long – haul data communications, involving interactions between many pairs of subscribers, packet switching has emerged as the dominant technology. Packet-switching networks employ a distributed network of nodes so that packets of data flowing between many subscriber pairs can dynamically share the expensive wideband leased long-distance telephone circuits between the nodes. Which of the following is true, according to the paragraph?
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B.
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30.  Directions for Questions (26 - 30): In each of the following questions, there is a paragraph followed by an argument or a question and four conclusions marked as (a), (b), (c) and (d). You have to choose one of them as your answer to the question or the argument.Out of the many senses that we possess, the sense of smell has given our lives a wonderful dimension. While a place full of four smells deters us, we get consistently attracted towards fragrant and aromatic places .We cannot deny the power of smell. On the basis of such an instinct of most living beings, the perfume industry has grown into a multi-billion industry. Which of the following can be a continuation of this paragraph?
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31.  Let C be a circle with centre P0 and AB be a diameter of C. Suppose P1 is the mid point of the line segment P0B1, P2 is the mid point of the line segment P1B and so on. Let C1, C2, C3, …..be the circles with diameters P0P1, P1P2, P2P3, …….respectively. Suppose that circles C1, C2, ….are all shaded. The ratio of the area of the unshaded portion of C to that of the original circle C is
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32.  A string of length 40metres is divided into three parts of different lengths. The first part is three times the second part, and the last part is 23 metres smaller than the first part, then the length of the largest part is
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33.  In order to cover less distance, a boy – rather than going along the longer and the shorter lengths of the rectangular path, goes by the diagonal. The boy finds that he saved a distance equal to half the longer side. The ratio of breadth and length is
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34.  Mayank, Mirza, Little and Jagbir bought a motorbike for $60. Mayank contributed half of the total amount contributed by others. Mirza contributed one – third of total amount contributed by others, and little contributed one – fourth of the total amount contributed by others. What was the money paid by Jagbir?
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35.  On a straight road XY, 100 metres in length, 5 stones are kept beginning from the end X. The distance between two adjacent stones is 2 metres. A man is asked to collect the stones one at a time and put at the end Y. What is the distance covered by him?
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36.  A person is asked to randomly pick two balls from a bag which has 15 red and 5 blue  balls. The probability that the person picks two balls of the same colour is           
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37.  N is a four digit perfect square whose decimal digits are each less than 7. If each digit in N is increased by 3, then the new number is also a perfect square. What is the square root of N?
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38.  How many lead balls of radius ½ cm can be made out of a solid lead sphere of diameter 16 cms?   
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39.  if 6x – 4y = 8, then 2y – 3x is:
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40.  It takes 30 days to fill a laboratory dish with bacteria. If the size of the bacteria doubles each day, how long did it take for the bacteria to fill one half of the dish?
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41.  A freely falling body, starting from rest, falls 16m during the 1st second, 48m during the 2nd second , 80m during the 3rd second etc. The distance it falls during the 15th second is
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42.  Four friends bought a car. The first friend paid half of the sum paid by the others, the second paid one third of the sum paid by the others ; the third paid one quarter of what was paid by the others. If the fourth paid Rs. 13,000 then find the cost of the car.
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43.  DIRECTIONS for questions 43 to 47:Each question is followed by two statements, I and II.   Answer each question using the following instructions:Choose [a]if the question can be answered by using one of the statements alone, but cannot be answered using the other statement alone.Choose [b]   if the question can be answered by using either statement alone.Choose [c]   if the question can be answered using both statements together, but cannot be answered using either statement alone.Choose [d]   if the question cannot be answered even by using both statements together.If a = 2b and b = c2, is b odd or even? A. a is even . B. c is odd.
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44.  DIRECTIONS for questions 43 to 47:Each question is followed by two statements, I and II.   Answer each question using the following instructions: Choose [a]if the question can be answered by using one of the statements alone, but cannot be answered using the other statement alone. Choose [b]   if the question can be answered by using either statement alone. Choose [c]   if the question can be answered using both statements together, but cannot be answered using either statement alone. Choose [d]   if the question cannot be answered even by using both statements together. How many students are present in the class? A. if 4 students are absent, there are more than 15 students in the class. B. if 4 more students join, there are more than 15 students in the class.
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D.
45.  DIRECTIONS for questions 43 to 47:Each question is followed by two statements, I and II.   Answer each question using the following instructions: Choose [a]if the question can be answered by using one of the statements alone, but cannot be answered using the other statement alone. Choose [b]   if the question can be answered by using either statement alone. Choose [c]   if the question can be answered using both statements together, but cannot be answered using either statement alone. Choose [d]   if the question cannot be answered even by using both statements together. What is the average of x, y and z? A. average of x and y is 5. B. the sum of y and z is 22.
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B.
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D.
46.  DIRECTIONS for questions 43 to 47:Each question is followed by two statements, I and II.   Answer each question using the following instructions: Choose [a]if the question can be answered by using one of the statements alone, but cannot be answered using the other statement alone. Choose [b]   if the question can be answered by using either statement alone. Choose [c]   if the question can be answered using both statements together, but cannot be answered using either statement alone. Choose [d]   if the question cannot be answered even by using both statements together. What is the number of triangles that can be formed? A. each triangle has vertices involving exacty three of the given ten concyclic points. B. the perimeter of the triangle with integral sides is 14.
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B.
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D.
47.  DIRECTIONS for questions 43 to 47:Each question is followed by two statements, I and II.   Answer each question using the following instructions: Choose [a]if the question can be answered by using one of the statements alone, but cannot be answered using the other statement alone. Choose [b]   if the question can be answered by using either statement alone. Choose [c]   if the question can be answered using both statements together, but cannot be answered using either statement alone. Choose [d]   if the question cannot be answered even by using both statements together. There are exactly two possible routes connecting Andre’s home and his office. What is the distance of the longer route? A. when Andre drives from his home to his office by shorter route and returns by the longer route, he drives a total of 65 kilometers. B. when he drives both ways by the shorter route, he drives a total of 50 kilometres.
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48.  Directions for Questions (48-50): Given below are the forecasts of the World and Asian energy demand for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010. The demand is given in million barrels per day crude oil equivalent.                                                                                                          
  1990 2000 2010
  World Asia World Asia World Asia
Petroleum 50.0 4.0 70.0 10.0 80.0 15.0
Natural gas 30.0 0.5 40.0 2.5 50.0 5.0
Solid fuels 50.0 4.0 60.0 5.0 75.0 10.0
Nuclear 10.0 0.5 20.0 1.0 25.0 1.3
Hydropower 1.0 1.0 10.0 1.5 20.0 2.0
Total 150.0 10.0 200.9 20.0 250.0 33.3
Which is the fuel whose proportion in the total energy demand will decrease continuously over the period 1990 – 2010, in Asia?
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B.
C.
D.
49.  Directions for Questions (48-50): Given below are the forecasts of the World and Asian energy demand for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010. The demand is given in million barrels per day crude oil equivalent.                                                                                                          
  1990 2000 2010
  World Asia World Asia World Asia
Petroleum 50.0 4.0 70.0 10.0 80.0 15.0
Natural gas 30.0 0.5 40.0 2.5 50.0 5.0
Solid fuels 50.0 4.0 60.0 5.0 75.0 10.0
Nuclear 10.0 0.5 20.0 1.0 25.0 1.3
Hydropower 1.0 1.0 10.0 1.5 20.0 2.0
Total 150.0 10.0 200.9 20.0 250.0 33.3
Which is the fuel whose proportion to the total energy demand of the world will remain constant over the period 1990 – 2010 but whose proportion will increase in the total energy demand in Asia?
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B.
C.
D.
50.  Directions for Questions (48-50): Given below are the forecasts of the World and Asian energy demand for the years 1990, 2000 and 2010. The demand is given in million barrels per day crude oil equivalent.                                                                                                          
  1990 2000 2010
  World Asia World Asia World Asia
Petroleum 50.0 4.0 70.0 10.0 80.0 15.0
Natural gas 30.0 0.5 40.0 2.5 50.0 5.0
Solid fuels 50.0 4.0 60.0 5.0 75.0 10.0
Nuclear 10.0 0.5 20.0 1.0 25.0 1.3
Hydropower 1.0 1.0 10.0 1.5 20.0 2.0
Total 150.0 10.0 200.9 20.0 250.0 33.3
Over 1990 – 2010, which two facts meet more than 60% of the total energy demand of both the World and Asia?
A.
B.
C.
D.
51.  Directions for Questions (51 – 55) : Identify the worst option in the context of a modern working professional.Members of the team continuously need motivation so that their performance becomes better with every task accomplished. In order to keep them going you as a team manager would:
A.
B.
C.
D.
52.  Directions for Questions (51 – 55) : Identify the worst option in the context of a modern working professional. In a particular team the number of members is more than required, as a result of which too many people are assigned the same job and the efficiency of the team is affected negatively. Then you as a manager would:
A.
B.
C.
D.
53.  Directions for Questions (51 – 55) : Identify the worst option in the context of a modern working professional. An employee who is otherwise very efficient fails to deliver results on time. Then you as an employer would:
A.
B.
C.
D.
54.  Directions for Questions (51 – 55) : Identify the worst option in the context of a modern working professional. If you acknowledge that certain member of your group are resorting to unfair practices to accomplish the task given on time and you as a manager have been assigned its responsibility. Then you would
A.
B.
C.
D.
55.  Directions for Questions (51 – 55) : Identify the worst option in the context of a modern working professional. You are a manager of the team where some of the team members have fallen ill as a result of which cannot work. You are required to accomplish a task within a specified time period. Then you would:
A.
B.
C.
D.
56.  Directions for Questions (56 – 58) :In each of the questions, there is a paragraph followed by four conclusions marked as (1), (2), (3), and (4). You have to rank the conclusions in the ORDER OF YOUR PREFERENCE and then choose the option that matches your preference list.You have been assigned the task of dividing a team into groups for accomplishment of a task. What would be your basis for group formation? You would group people on the basis of:(1) Compatibility with each other.    (2)  People having similar approach to any work.(3)  People with similar skills.         (4)   Diversity in each group.
A.
B.
C.
D.
57.  Directions for Questions (56 – 58) :In each of the questions, there is a paragraph followed by four conclusions marked as (1), (2), (3), and (4). You have to rank the conclusions in the ORDER OF YOUR PREFERENCE and then choose the option that matches your preference list.A company requires a group of highly specialized people with adequate knowledge and experience to work on a project. So should the company:1. Try and get the personnel from Rivalry Company to create competition    2. Employ new people who may have the skills but may lack experience.3. Provide training to the existing personnel.    4. Get the work outsourced.
A.
B.
C.
D.
58.  Directions for Questions (56 – 58) :In each of the questions, there is a paragraph followed by four conclusions marked as (1), (2), (3), and (4). You have to rank the conclusions in the ORDER OF YOUR PREFERENCE and then choose the option that matches your preference list.A company was required to finish a particular task by a specified deadline. The task remains unaccomplished inspite of the fact that the workers are working full time and the deadline is nearing. Then should the company:1 Get the task outsourced             2. Induce workers to work overtime.3. Ask for extension of deadline.    4. Bear the cost of task not being accomplished on time.
A.
B.
C.
D.
59.  A company has strength of 5000 workers working in it belonging from different cultures, religions and countries. There are often cross-cultural differences amongst the employees as a result of which the output is far below than expected. Thus in order to ensure that the final output of the company doesn’t get affected you would:
A.
B.
C.
D.
60.  A particular company is facing a problem where inspite of availability of all resources the end result is not achieved. The reason being that there is no clear objectives or targets set for the employees. Thus in such a situation you would:
A.
B.
C.
D.
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