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Figurative Laguage 3: Paradox, Irony, Overstatement, Understatement

10 Questions
Figurative Language Quizzes & Trivia

A quiz for Figurative Language 3. This is the second sentence.

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    The form of figurative language used in Aesop’s fable regarding the man and the Satyr is:
    • A. 

      Overstatement

    • B. 

      Symphonic

    • C. 

      Understatement

    • D. 

      Paradox

    • E. 

      Irony

  • 2. 
    At first, a paradox is:
    • A. 

      Hard to understand

    • B. 

      Seemingly impossible

    • C. 

      Depressing

    • D. 

      Obvious

    • E. 

      Musically correct

  • 3. 
    An overstatement is AKA a(n):
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Smiley

    • D. 

      Overscore

    • E. 

      Epic

  • 4. 
    Which of the following sentences must be an overstatement (please use common sense)?
    • A. 

      Are you literally coming over?

    • B. 

      There was a huge elephant in my doorway.

    • C. 

      There were a ton of people at the beach.

    • D. 

      Many of bees came at me when I smacked their hive.

    • E. 

      I’d walk a thousand miles just to meet you.

  • 5. 
    Which of the following statements must be an understatement? 
    • A. 

      Sitting by the fire made the man feel nice and warm.

    • B. 

      The fire was extremely hot compared to the coffee.

    • C. 

      The man felt an unpleasant sensation when he accidentally stepped on the campfire.

    • D. 

      My back was killing me after all the heavy lifting.

  • 6. 
    Satire is:
    • A. 

      A type of linen

    • B. 

      Form of literature used to ridicule human vice

    • C. 

      Form of literature used to praise human vice

    • D. 

      Form of literature that is no longer in use

    • E. 

      Form of literature about sadness and depression

  • 7. 
    Saying the opposite of what one actually means is called:
    • A. 

      Verbal irony

    • B. 

      Dramatic irony

    • C. 

      Situational irony

  • 8. 
    A discrepancy b/w what the speaker says and what the poem means is:
    • A. 

      Verbal irony

    • B. 

      Dramatic irony

    • C. 

      Situational irony

  • 9. 
    A discrepancy b/w what is the expected outcome and what acutally results is called:
    • A. 

      Verbal irony

    • B. 

      Dramatic irony

    • C. 

      Situational irony

  • 10. 
    Bitter or cutting speech intended to wound the feelings is called (for example: Good going, genius)