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AP Lit Terms Quiz

57 Questions
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Multiple choice quiz on literary terms found on the AP Literature and Compositon exam.

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 2. 
    • A. 

      Rhetoric

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Style

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      Metonymy

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Oxymoron

    • D. 

      Pun

  • 4. 
    a statement that appears self-contradictory, but that reveals a kind of truth.
    • A. 

      Paradox

    • B. 

      Irony

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 5. 
    • A. 

      Satire

    • B. 

      Farce

    • C. 

      Parody

    • D. 

      Fable

  • 6. 
    poetic and rhetorical device in which normally unassociated ideas, words, or phrases are placed next to one another, creating an effect of surprise and wit.
    • A. 

      Parallel structure

    • B. 

      Rhetorical question

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 7. 
    a figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things without the use of such specific words of comparison as like, as, than, or resembles.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      Irony

    • B. 

      Dramatic irony

    • C. 

      Indirect characterization

    • D. 

      Direct characterization

  • 9. 
    in general, a story that ends with a happy resolution of the conflicts faced by the main character or characters.
    • A. 

      Tragedy

    • B. 

      Farce

    • C. 

      Comedy

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 10. 
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Style

  • 11. 
    • A. 

      Antihero

    • B. 

      Protagonist

    • C. 

      Antagonist

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 12. 
    a figure of speech that uses an incredible exaggeration or overstatement, for effect. “If I told you once, I’ve told you a million times….”
    • A. 

      Understatement

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 13. 
    • A. 

      Oxymoron

    • B. 

      Metonymy

    • C. 

      Metaphor

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 14. 
    • A. 

      Tone

    • B. 

      Setting

    • C. 

      Mood

    • D. 

      Style

  • 15. 
    one of the characters tells the story.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First pierson point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 16. 
    an unknown narrator, tells the story, but this narrator zooms in to focus on the thoughts and feelings of only one character.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 17. 
    an all knowing narrator tells the story, also using the third person pronouns. This narrator, instead of focusing on one character only, often tells us everything about many characters.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 18. 
    a narrator who is totally impersonal and objective tells the story, with no comment on any characters or events.
    • A. 

      Third person point of view

    • B. 

      First person point of view

    • C. 

      Omniscient point of view

    • D. 

      Objective point of view

  • 19. 
    a figure of speech in which an object or animal is given human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Metonymy

    • C. 

      Polysyndeton

    • D. 

      Metaphor

  • 20. 
    a poem consisting of four lines, or four lines of a poem that can be considered as a unit.
    • A. 

      Couplet

    • B. 

      Quatrain

    • C. 

      Lyric poem

    • D. 

      Confessional poetry

  • 21. 
    a person, place, thing, or event that has meaning in itself and that also stands for something more than itself.
    • A. 

      Simile

    • B. 

      Theme

    • C. 

      Symbol

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 22. 
    the attitude a writer takes toward the subject of a work, the characters in it, or the audience, revealed through diction, figurative language, and organization.
    • A. 

      Mood

    • B. 

      Style

    • C. 

      Tone

    • D. 

      Setting

  • 23. 
    the insight about human life that is revealed in a literary work.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Theme

    • C. 

      Justaposition

    • D. 

      Diction

  • 24. 
    story or poem in which characters, settings, and events stand for other people or events or for abstract ideas or qualities.
    • A. 

      Parable

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Allegory

    • D. 

      Farce

  • 25. 
    Opponent who struggles against or blocks the hero in a story.
    • A. 

      Antagonist

    • B. 

      Protagonist

    • C. 

      Epithet

    • D. 

      Foil

  • 26. 
    attributing human characteristics to an animal or inanimate object
    • A. 

      Hyperbole

    • B. 

      Aphorism

    • C. 

      Anthropomorphism

    • D. 

      Characterization

  • 27. 
    the author tells us explicitly what the character is like: sneaky, generous, mean to pets and so on. Romantic style literature relied more heavily on this form.
    • A. 

      Direct characterization

    • B. 

      Indirect characterization

    • C. 

      Static character

    • D. 

      Dynamic character

  • 28. 
    the associations and emotional overtones that have become attached to a word or phrase, in addition to its strict dictionary definition.
    • A. 

      Diction

    • B. 

      Tone

    • C. 

      Connotation

    • D. 

      Mood

  • 29. 
    is one who changes in some important way as a result of the story’s action.
    • A. 

      Foil

    • B. 

      Static character

    • C. 

      Dynamic character

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 30. 
    is one who does not change much in the course of a story.
    • A. 

      Foil

    • B. 

      Static character

    • C. 

      Dynamic character

    • D. 

      Protagonist

  • 31. 
    two consecutive rhyming lines of poetry.
    • A. 

      Couplet

    • B. 

      Quatrain

    • C. 

      Meter

    • D. 

      Sextet

  • 32. 
    Deliberately suggesting two or more different, and sometimes conflicting, meanings in a work. An event or situation that may be interpreted in more than one way- this is done on purpose by the author, when it is not done on purpose, it is vagueness, and detracts from the work.
    • A. 

      Situational irony

    • B. 

      Ambiguity

    • C. 

      Juxtaposition

    • D. 

      Anthropomorphism

  • 33. 
    an adjective or adjective phrase applied to a person or thing that is frequentlyused to emphasize a characteristic quality. “Father of our country” and “the great Emancipator” are examples.
    • A. 

      Epithet

    • B. 

      Foil

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 34. 
    a type of comedy in which ridiculous and often stereotyped characters are involved in silly, far-fetched situations.
    • A. 

      Farce

    • B. 

      Parable

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 35. 
    the use of language to evoke a picture or a concrete sensation of a person, a thing, a place, or an experience.
    • A. 

      Symbol

    • B. 

      Imagery

    • C. 

      Simile

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 36. 
    occurs when someone says one thing but really means something else.
    • A. 

      Verbal irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Dramatic irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 37. 
    takes place when there is a discrepancy between what is expected to happen, or what would be appropriate to happen, and what really does happen.
    • A. 

      Verbal irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Dramatic irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 38. 
    is so called because it is often used on stage. A character in the play or story thinks one thing is true, but the audience or reader knows better.
    • A. 

      Verbal irony

    • B. 

      Situational irony

    • C. 

      Dramatic irony

    • D. 

      Satire

  • 39. 
    a recurring image, word, phrase, action, idea, object, or situation used throughout a work (or in several works by one author), unifying the work by tying the current situation to previous ones, or new ideas to the theme.
    • A. 

      Theme

    • B. 

      Motif

    • C. 

      Symbol

    • D. 

      Foreshadowing

  • 40. 
    the repetition of words or phrases that have similar grammatical structures.
    • A. 

      Motif

    • B. 

      Metonymy

    • C. 

      Rhetoric

    • D. 

      Parallel structure

  • 41. 
    the reasons for a character’s behavior.
    • A. 

      Foreshadowing

    • B. 

      Characterization

    • C. 

      Irony

    • D. 

      Motivation

  • 42. 
    a type of writing that ridicules the shortcomings of people or institutions in an attempt to bring about a change.
    • A. 

      Parable

    • B. 

      Satire

    • C. 

      Parody

    • D. 

      Elegy

  • 43. 
    a statement that says less than what is meant. Example: During the second war with Iraq, American troops complained of a fierce sand storm that made even the night-vision equipment useless. A British commando commented about the storm: “It’s a bit breezy.”
    • A. 

      Ambiguity

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Understatement

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

  • 44. 
    reference to someone or something that is known from history, literature, religion, politics, sports, science, or another branch of culture. An indirect reference to something (usually from literature, etc.).
    • A. 

      Theme

    • B. 

      Solioquy

    • C. 

      Refrain

    • D. 

      Allusion

  • 45. 
    calling out to an imaginary, dead, or absent person, or to a place or thing, or a personified abstract idea. If the character is asking a god or goddess for inspiration it is called an invocation.
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Apostrophe

    • D. 

      Monologue

  • 46. 
    conflicts can exist between two people, between a person and nature or a machine or between a person a whole society.
    • A. 

      Foil

    • B. 

      Internal conflict

    • C. 

      External conflict

    • D. 

      Ambiguity

  • 47. 
    a conflict involving opposing forces within a person’s mind.
    • A. 

      Internal conflict

    • B. 

      External conflict

    • C. 

      Antagonist

    • D. 

      Metonymy

  • 48. 
    a long narrative poem, written in heightened language , which recounts the deeds of a heroic character who embodies the values of a particular society.
    • A. 

      Epic

    • B. 

      Soliloquy

    • C. 

      Monologue

    • D. 

      Lyric poem

  • 49. 
    a statement that appears self-contradictory, but that reveals a kind of truth.
    • A. 

      Situational irony

    • B. 

      Metaphor

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Paradox

  • 50. 
    a figure of speech that makes an explicitly comparison between two unlike things, using words such as like, as , than, or resembles.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Analogy

    • D. 

      Allegory

  • 51. 
    in general, a story in which a heroic character either dies or comes to some other unhappy end.
    • A. 

      Tragedy

    • B. 

      Farce

    • C. 

      Satire

    • D. 

      Comedy

  • 52. 
    Comparison made between two things to show how they are alike
    • A. 

      Extended metaphor

    • B. 

      Analogy

    • C. 

      Allegory

    • D. 

      Simile

  • 53. 
    Brief story, told to illustrate a point or serve as an example of something,often shows character of an individual
    • A. 

      Allegory

    • B. 

      Perosnification

    • C. 

      Epic

    • D. 

      Anecdote

  • 54. 
    the repetition of similar vowel sounds followed by different consonant sounds especially in words that are together.
    • A. 

      Assonance

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • D. 

      Balance

  • 55. 
    Words which are inaccurate if interpreted literally, but are used to describe. Similes and metaphors are common forms.
    • A. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • B. 

      Figurative language

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Juxtaposition

  • 56. 
    the use of words whose sounds echo their sense. “Pop.” “Zap.”
    • A. 

      Personification

    • B. 

      Alliteration

    • C. 

      Assonance

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

  • 57. 
     scene that interrupts the normal chronological sequence of events in a story to depict something that happened at an earlier time.
    • A. 

      Flashback

    • B. 

      Foil

    • C. 

      Motif

    • D. 

      Theme