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Unit 2 History Ch. 26

65 Questions
History Quizzes & Trivia

America: A Narrative History 8th Edition

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    In the 1920s, people of Latin American descent became the fastest-growing ethnic minority in the United States.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 2. 
    The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s was mainly a southern rural organization.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 4. 
    Proponents of prohibition displayed ethnic and social prejudices in the drive to make America “dry.”
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 5. 
    The Roaring Twenties pitted a cosmopolitan urban America against the values of an insular, rural America.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 6. 
    Jazz music inspired rural youth to remember their culture’s musical roots.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 7. 
    “Flappers” was the slang word for illegal drinking establishments in the 1920s.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 9. 
    Women gained the right to vote in 1916 as World War I began.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 10. 
    The NAACP favored militant protests over legal challenges as a way to end racial discrimination.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 11. 
    Albert Einstein, Max Planck, and Werner Heisenberg were members of Al Capone’s gang in Chicago.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 12. 
    The culture of modernism emphasized order and certainty.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 13. 
    During the 1920s, ideas of scientists about the nature of the universe inspired modernist artists to try new techniques.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 14. 
    The major American prophets of modernist literature lived in Europe.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 15. 
    The southern renaissance was characterized by a dying traditional world and the birth of a modern, commercial world inspired by World War I’s industrial production.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 16. 
    Political and social radicalism arose after World War I because:
    • A. 

      People had been bored by World War I’s rationing of goods

    • B. 

      Postwar culture was fraught with contradictions and tensions

    • C. 

      Southerners neglected agricultural responsibilities

    • D. 

      Northern cities asserted cultural superiority because of industry

  • 17. 
    Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were:
    • A. 

      Convicted of bombing eight army supply trucks

    • B. 

      Two Italian-born anarchists sentenced to death and executed even though there was doubt as to their guilt

    • C. 

      Finally exonerated of the charges of payroll robbery and murder

    • D. 

      Murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan

  • 18. 
    The immigration quota laws passed in the 1920s:
    • A. 

      Favored immigrants from southern and eastern Europe

    • B. 

      Encouraged Asians to immigrate to America

    • C. 

      Set strict limits on immigration from Mexico

    • D. 

      Favored immigrants from northern and western Europe

  • 19. 
    The 1924 immigration law:
    • A. 

      Stopped the illegal flow of immigrants into the United States

    • B. 

      Encouraged immigration from Japan and China

    • C. 

      Continued an open door policy, whereby almost all new arrivals would be admitted

    • D. 

      Set strict yearly limits on the number of immigrants allowed into the country

  • 20. 
    The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s was based mainly on:
    • A. 

      Anti-Semitic rhetoric

    • B. 

      Prohibition

    • C. 

      Fundamentalist religious beliefs

    • D. 

      “100 percent Americanism”

  • 21. 
    Who said, “When the hordes of aliens walk to the ballot box and their votes outnumber yours, then that alien horde has got you by the throat”?
    • A. 

      Clarence Darrow

    • B. 

      Ruth Benedict

    • C. 

      William J. Simmons

    • D. 

      Moorefield Storey

  • 22. 
    How many members did the Ku Klux Klan allegedly have at its peak?
    • A. 

      As many as 4 million

    • B. 

      As many as 6 million

    • C. 

      As many as 8 million

    • D. 

      As many as 10 million

  • 23. 
    William Jennings Bryan:
    • A. 

      Believed evolution should be taught in science classes

    • B. 

      Prosecuted John Scopes in the Dayton, Tennessee, evolution case for teaching evolution

    • C. 

      Was the mayor of Dayton, Tennessee

    • D. 

      Was a vocal supporter of the Ku Klux Klan

  • 24. 
    The Scopes trial:
    • A. 

      Pitted William Howard Taft, former U.S. president and confessed agnostic, for the prosecution against fundamentalist Clarence Darrow for the defense

    • B. 

      Concerned a state law that prohibited the teaching of evolution in public schools

    • C. 

      Represented victory of the fundamentalist movement in America

    • D. 

      Prosecuted Klansmen for lynching

  • 25. 
    Which one of the following is associated with Dayton, Tennessee?
    • A. 

      Margaret Sanger

    • B. 

      F. Scott Fitzgerald

    • C. 

      The lynching of three Italian anarchists

    • D. 

      The Scopes trial

  • 26. 
    As a result of the Scopes trial:
    • A. 

      John T. Scopes was found guilty of teaching evolution

    • B. 

      The fundamentalist movement disappeared

    • C. 

      William Jennings Bryan’s political career was revived

    • D. 

      Tennessee’s anti-evolution law was declared unconstitutional

  • 27. 
    Jazz:
    • A. 

      Was a European innovation emerging from modern “classical” music

    • B. 

      Blended African and European musical traditions

    • C. 

      Was invented by Bennie Goodman

    • D. 

      Helped calm the fears of rural fundamentalists

  • 28. 
    The novel This Side of Paradise concerned:immigrant life in New York City
    • A. 

      Immigrant life in New York City

    • B. 

      The lax enforcement of Prohibition

    • C. 

      Modernist student life at Princeton

    • D. 

      Fundamentalist attacks on modernism

  • 29. 
    Petting parties were:
    • A. 

      Opportunities for young men and women to experiment sexually with each other

    • B. 

      Opportunities for young men and women to learn about proper treatment of dogs and cats

    • C. 

      Opportunities to raise money for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)

    • D. 

      Visits to the zoo so young people could get away from their parents

  • 30. 
    All of the following could be associated with flappers EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      Bobbed hair

    • B. 

      Victorian values

    • C. 

      Smoking and drinking

    • D. 

      Shorter skirts

  • 31. 
    Margaret Sanger is best associated with which of the following?
    • A. 

      Suffrage

    • B. 

      Temperance

    • C. 

      Child labor

    • D. 

      Birth control

  • 32. 
    In 1921, Margaret Sanger organized:
    • A. 

      The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)

    • B. 

      The Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU)

    • C. 

      The College of New Jersey

    • D. 

      The American Birth Control League

  • 33. 
    Alice Paul:
    • A. 

      Was F. Scott Fitzgerald’s wife

    • B. 

      Was the pseudonym of Sylvia Jenkins, author of many stories in Paris Nights and other pulp magazines

    • C. 

      Was the militant head of the National American Woman Suffrage Association’s Congressional Committee

    • D. 

      Wrote The American Family, a sociological study of the effects of the new morality on family life

  • 34. 
    Carrie Chapman Catt was best known for her achievements promoting:
    • A. 

      Modernist art

    • B. 

      Prohibition

    • C. 

      Women’s suffrage

    • D. 

      Racial reforms

  • 35. 
    The Roaring Twenties was dubbed “the Jazz Age” by:
    • A. 

      Upton Sinclair

    • B. 

      Ernest Hemingway

    • C. 

      Langston Hughes

    • D. 

      F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • 36. 
    The journalist H. L. Mencken:
    • A. 

      Called the 1920s the Jazz Age

    • B. 

      Described Americans as a “booboisie”

    • C. 

      Celebrated the material prosperity of the 1920s

    • D. 

      Did more than any other writer to popularize Freud’s sexual theories

  • 37. 
    The author of Main Street, a novel about the banality of small-town life, was:
    • A. 

      Sherwood Anderson

    • B. 

      Countee Cullen

    • C. 

      James Weldon Johnson

    • D. 

      Sinclair Lewis

  • 38. 
    By the 1910s, the Anti-Saloon League:
    • A. 

      Was out of business

    • B. 

      Only had a minimal effect on Americans

    • C. 

      Called for a withdrawal of the Eighteenth Amendment

    • D. 

      Had become one of the most effective pressure groups in American history

  • 39. 
    The amendment to the constitution that barred the manufacture or sale of intoxicating liquors was ratified in:
    • A. 

      1911

    • B. 

      1919

    • C. 

      1922

    • D. 

      1928

  • 40. 
    Not being able to convict Al Capone on bootlegging charges, the federal government convicted him for:
    • A. 

      Illegal immigration activities

    • B. 

      Drug trafficking

    • C. 

      Contempt of Congress

    • D. 

      Tax evasion

  • 41. 
    Which amendment to the constitution gave women the right to vote?
    • A. 

      Seventeenth

    • B. 

      Eighteenth

    • C. 

      Nineteenth

    • D. 

      Twentieth

  • 42. 
    Congress adopted the equal rights amendment in:
    • A. 

      1912

    • B. 

      1921

    • C. 

      1931

    • D. 

      1972

  • 43. 
    Which of the following statements best describes working women in the 1920s?
    • A. 

      The number of employed women rose.

    • B. 

      The number of employed women declined.

    • C. 

      Women were finally able to break into many formerly “male” occupations.

    • D. 

      A woman was finally elected president of the American Federation of Labor.

  • 44. 
    The “Susan B. Anthony amendment” concerned:
    • A. 

      Women’s suffrage

    • B. 

      Prohibition

    • C. 

      Religion in society

    • D. 

      Immigration restrictions

  • 45. 
    The movement of southern blacks to the North:
    • A. 

      Was called the Great Migration

    • B. 

      Created the rise of the KKK

    • C. 

      Saw many African Americans return to Africa

    • D. 

      Was so large that southern agriculture was interrupted

  • 46. 
    The author of Cane, considered by many to be the single greatest work of the Harlem Renaissance, was:
    • A. 

      Claude McKay

    • B. 

      Jean Toomer

    • C. 

      DuBose Heyward

    • D. 

      Langston Hughes

  • 47. 
    The Universal Negro Improvement Association:
    • A. 

      Sponsored black artists and writers

    • B. 

      Was led by Marcus Garvey

    • C. 

      Promoted Booker T. Washington’s idea of racial peace through accommodation

    • D. 

      Was the forerunner of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)

  • 48. 
    Marcus Garvey:
    • A. 

      Sought reconciliation with southern whites

    • B. 

      Said blacks should return to Africa

    • C. 

      Was a revered jazz saxophonist

    • D. 

      Helped lead the suffragist movement

  • 49. 
    The NAACP emphasized:
    • A. 

      Legal action against discrimination

    • B. 

      The formation of a black political party

    • C. 

      Vocational and technical education

    • D. 

      Garvey’s concept of social and political separation of blacks

  • 50. 
    Which of the following did W. E. B. Du Bois say in his opposition to Marcus Garvey?
    • A. 

      “We have to rid ourselves of this viper.”

    • B. 

      “He will help only his friends and not the great mass of black people.”

    • C. 

      “He thinks that black people only are good enough to be plumbers.”

    • D. 

      He is “the most dangerous enemy of the Negro race. . . . He is either a lunatic or a traitor.”

  • 51. 
    The culture of modernism was characterized by:
    • A. 

      Religious fervor

    • B. 

      Temperance

    • C. 

      Developments in science that challenged perceptions of certainty

    • D. 

      A reliance on the automobile

  • 52. 
    In physics, the development of quantum theory is most associated with:
    • A. 

      Albert Einstein

    • B. 

      Isaac Newton

    • C. 

      Max Planck

    • D. 

      Werner Heisenberg

  • 53. 
    In physics, the theory of relativity was developed and explained by
    • A. 

      Albert Einstein

    • B. 

      Isaac Newton

    • C. 

      Max Planck

    • D. 

      Werner Heisenberg

  • 54. 
    The theories of relativity and quantum physics led people to:
    • A. 

      Have petting parties

    • B. 

      Enter retirement

    • C. 

      Deny the relevance of absolute values in society at large

    • D. 

      Recognize jazz’s role in destabilizing American society

  • 55. 
    Modernists in art and literature came to believe that:
    • A. 

      Nature’s reality can be captured in art

    • B. 

      Human reason ruled all of nature

    • C. 

      Science and art had no connection

    • D. 

      The subconscious is more interesting and more potent than reason

  • 56. 
    The Armory Show in 1913:
    • A. 

      Was a controversial exhibition of modern art

    • B. 

      Introduced many women to new clothing fashions

    • C. 

      Featured poetry readings by Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot

    • D. 

      Showed the continuing appeal of traditional values

  • 57. 
    All of the following were prophets of modernism EXCEPT:
    • A. 

      Ezra Pound

    • B. 

      Edward Bellamy

    • C. 

      Gertrude Stein

    • D. 

      T. S. Eliot

  • 58. 
    The novels of Ernest Hemingway:
    • A. 

      Portrayed utopian communities in a socialist society

    • B. 

      Attacked the corruption of machine politics in the large cities

    • C. 

      Traced the philosophical connections between twentieth-century America and eighteenth-century Britain

    • D. 

      Depicted the cult of athletic masculinity and a desperate search for life

  • 59. 
    F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote of:
    • A. 

      Rational people dedicated to traditional values

    • B. 

      Sad young characters who displayed potential but were ultimately doomed

    • C. 

      Patriotic fervor among the American expatriate writers in Paris

    • D. 

      Masculinity and a desperate search for life

  • 60. 
    The Waste Land, a poem that became the favorite of many modernist readers because of its sense of disillusionment and its suggestion of a burned-out civilization, was written by:
    • A. 

      Franz Boas

    • B. 

      T. S. Eliot

    • C. 

      Ezra Pound

    • D. 

      Gertrude Stein

  • 61. 
    Modernism and the southern literary renaissance were products of the:
    • A. 

      1910s

    • B. 

      1920s

    • C. 

      1930s

    • D. 

      1890s

  • 62. 
    The southern literary renaissance came about because:
    • A. 

      The North won the Civil War

    • B. 

      Southern culture embraced the challenges of modernism

    • C. 

      Of the conflict between southern traditions and modern commercialism

    • D. 

      Modernism came to embrace traditional southern culture

  • 63. 
    William Faulkner:
    • A. 

      Wrote about his own experiences in New York City

    • B. 

      Was one of the South’s greatest modernist writers

    • C. 

      Exemplified the writers who left America for Europe

    • D. 

      Labeled World War I veterans the “lost generation”

  • 64. 
    Thomas Wolfe:was a modernist painter in Paris
    • A. 

      Was a modernist painter in Paris

    • B. 

      Was a promising writer who died in World War I

    • C. 

      Famously adhered to Sigmund Freud’s theories about sex

    • D. 

      Outraged traditionalists in his hometown, Asheville, North Carolina, with his writing

  • 65. 
    Modernism waned by the end of the 1920s because:
    • A. 

      Most of the artists committed suicide out of despair for civilization

    • B. 

      People quit buying the depressing books churned out by modernist writers

    • C. 

      The Great Depression overwhelmed the cultural alienation of the 1920s

    • D. 

      President Hoover demanded a return to traditional values