The First Black Marines 1942 - - 1949 Iwo Jima They Were There

29 Questions  I  By Oklamarine on December 23, 2008
The Montford Point Marines were the first African-Americans to serve in the United States Marine Corps. The black Marines were segregated at Montford Point Camp to train between 1942-1949. The men served in all-black units, mostly in the Pacific Theater, and distinguished themselves while battling racism from within and enemies from without.The Montford Point Marines are often hailed as important figures in American history, because they willingly fought to protect a nation that still did not offer them basic civil rights. The Montford Point Marines helped to integrate the armed forces and to encourage respect for African-American men and women in the armed forces. 

  

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1.  Sgt Charles Shaw, USMC became First Black Marine Drill Instructor at Parris Island Recruit Depot. Also that year Montford Point Camp was deactivated what year.
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2.  Retired Master Gunnery Sergeant Brooks E. Gray, Jr., first
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3.  1948 Executive order issued by President Harry S. Truman ending color bias in the American armed forces. What was that order number.
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4.  1941-On June 25, FDR issued Executive Order #, Fair Employment Practice Commission which directed the Armed Forces of the U.S. to accept all recruits "regardless of color, race, creed or national origin."what is the Order number?
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5.  1945-February 19th, the 8th Marine Ammo and 36th Marine Depot Companies landed on D-Day with elements of the First Amphibious Corps on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands. The 34th landed on the 24th. Private James M. Whitlock and James Davis of the 36th received the Bronze Star for "heroic achievements in connection with operations against the enemy." All units of the Fifth Amphibious Corps were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation. Admiral Chester Nimitz, Chief of Naval Operations said what.
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6.  Camp Gilbert H. Johnson, the Marine Camp Johnson is name for. What  was Johnson main duty?
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7.  When recruiting opened on 1 June, the first men to enlist were Alfred Masters and George O. Thompson (1 June), George W. James and John E. L. Tillman (2 June), Leonard L. Burns (3 June), and Edward A. Culp (5 June), all in the 8th Reserve District, headquartered at Pensacola, Florida. On 8 June, James W. Brown in the 3d District (New York) and George L. Glover and David W. Sheppard in the 6th and 7th Districts (Charleston) enlisted. What year did they join the Marines.
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8.  On August 26th, 1942 this person, was the first black recruit to arrive at Montford Point Camp. H&S Battery of 51st Composite Defense Bn.
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9.  15th, 3rd Ammo, 18th, 19th and 20th Marine Depo Companies landed and engaged in fierce attacks with the enemy on Saipan and Tinian Islands in the Marianas. All elements were awarded the?
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10.  1944- The First appointed Camp Band Drum Major and Bandmaster of the Montford Point Camp Band. What is his name?
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11.  July 21st, the 2nd and 4th Marine Ammo Companies landed on Guam, Marianas Islands. Cited for heroism and bravery, awarded the Navy Unit Commendation.  Luther Woodward of 4th Ammo cited with what award.
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12.  The Montford Point Marine Association is a nonprofit Veteran organization, established to perpetuate the legacy of the first African Americans who entered the United States Marine Corps from 1942 to 1949 at Montford Point Camp, New River, North Carolina.Membership in the Association is open to veterans and active members of all branches of the U. S. Armed Forces regardless of race, creed, or national origin. The purpose of the Association is to support educational assistance, veteran programs, and promotion of community services. The Association works to improve the social conditions of our veterans, local families, youth and the growing population of senior citizens.  Please make your comments below, and let others know about, The Montford Point Marines.http://www.montfordpointmarines.com/Semper Fidelis!James T. Averhart, Jr.National PresidentMontford Point Marine Association Inc
13.  Beginning in January 1943, all men in the 18-37 age group would be inducted into the services through the Selective Service System. To make the call-up equitable, at least 10 percent of those selected would be blacks, a proportion approximating the number of blacks in the U.S. population as a whole. True or False.
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14.  Returning Home52d Defense Battalion at Guam began a transition from combat unit to support organization. The change received official confirmation on 30 September when the battalion came under the 5th Service Depot, which also controlled the black ammunition and depot companies still on the island. A detachment from the 52d sailed to the Marshalls in October, relieved the 51st Defense Battalion at Eniwetok and Kwajalein, and returned to Guam in January. Some of the Marines not yet eligible for discharge cast off the role of depot troops and formed the Heavy Anti aircraft Group (Provisional), based at Saipan until disbanded in February 1947. The Marines of the 52d Defense Battalion, who remained on Guam after the group departed for Saipan, sailed for San Diego in the transport USS Wakefield (AP 21) on 13 March 1946. Hostilities against Japan ended on 15 August 1945.  As a rule, the Marine Corps discharged on the West Coast the men with homes west of the Mississippi River, while those living to the east of the river received their discharges on the East Coast. The men of the 52d Defense Battalion not discharged at Camp Pendleton returned to Montford Point, where Lieutenant Colonel Moore relinquished command on 21 April. The end came on 15 May, when the wartime unit was re designated the 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion in the postwar Marine Corps. Hostilities against Japan ended on what date.
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15.  In January 1945, he became sergeant major of the Montford Point Camp and in June of that year joined the 52d Defense Battalion on Guam, also as sergeant major, remaining in that assignment until the unit disbanded in 1946. His subsequent career included service during the Korean War. He retired in 1955 after completing a tour of duty as First Sergeant, Headquarters and Service Company, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division. He died in 1972. Two years afterward, the Marine Corps paid tribute to his accomplishments by re-designating the Montford Point Camp as Camp Gilbert H. Johnson.  What year was that?
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16.  The Death March Fraser Road would figure in one of the legends of Montford Point, the so-called Death March. One of the black Marines living in the ramshackle barracks formerly occupied by the Civilian Conservation Corps grew bored and used his bayonet to punch a hole in a wall, which had all the durability of cardboard. The non-commissioned officers questioned the men, who refused to identify the person guilty of the vandalism. As a result, the sergeants staged a nighttime forced march — the Death March in the lore of the Montford Point Marines — but this failed to elicit the name they sought. According to one account, when the column reached the site of the brig on Fraser Road, the black Marines decided that to go further would dishonor the memory of a dead comrade, Corporal Gilbert Fraser, Jr., who was killed in a training accident. They broke ranks, rushed the brig, and demanded to be arrested — or so the legend states. Since the number of potential prisoners would have been far too many for the structure to accommodate — they were "hanging out the windows," one of the black Marines has declared — the non-commissioned officers marched them back to the huts. Whatever the details, the incident became the source of pride and further intensified the solidarity among Montford Point's African-American Marines. Was this a nighttime or daylight march
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17.  The tempo of training picked up throughout the summer and fall of 1943, as African-American non-commissioned officers replaced more of the white enlisted men who had taught them to handle weapons and lead men in combat. On 20 August, the 51st Defense Battalion suffered its first fatality. During a disembarkation exercise, while the Marines of the 155mm Artillery Group scrambled down a net draped over a wooden structure representing the side of a transport, Corporal Gilbert Fraser, Jr., slipped, fell into a landing craft in the water below, and suffered injuries that claimed his life. In memory of the 30-year-old graduate of Virginia Union College, the road leading from Montford Point Camp to the artillery range was rename what.
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18.  The Montford Point Camp band was capable of producing jazz combos, dance orchestras, and concert groups of professional caliber. Fortunately, one of the young White officers who arrived early at Montford Point was Lieutenant Robert W. Troup, Jr., an accomplished composer and musician from New York, who established immediate rapport with the black musicians which carried over to the rest of the men.His earliest musical success came with the song "Daddy" which was a regional hit in 1941. Sammy Kaye and His Orchestra recorded "Daddy", which was no.1 for 8 weeks on the Billboard Best Seller chart and the no.5 record of 1941. Glenn Miller and His Orchestra also performed "Daddy" on their radio broadcasts. In the same year, his song "Snootie Little Cutie" was recorded by Frank Sinatra and Connie Haines with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra and the Pied Pipers. He served as a Captain in the us Marines during World War Two. He was one of the first white officer to be given command of an all black unit in Jacksonville, North Carolina, where the men were living in tents. Troup's Marines built Quonset huts, new latrines, a nightclub, a boxing ring, a basketball court and formed a basketball team, a jazz band, an orchestra, and had installed a miniature golf course for his men. Soon, white Marines of other units began spending time in that part of camp.Did Robert Troup write a song about Jacksonville, N.C.
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19.  Edgar R. Huff enliste d in the Marine Corps in June and underwent training at the new Montford Point Camp. "I wanted to be a Marine," he said years later, "because I had always heard that the Marine Corps was the toughest outfit going, and I felt I was the toughest going, so I wanted to be a member of the best organization." His toughness and physical strength had served him well while a crane rigger for the Republic Steel Company in Alabama City, near his home town of Gadsden, Alabama. What year did Huff join the Marine Corps.
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20.  Although the public announcement was not made until 20 May, the basic instructions for Marine Corps Recruiting Divisions were sent out in a letter from the Commandant on 15 May. This letter set a quota of 200 recruits each from the Eastern and Central Divisions while the Southern was to furnish 500 of the initial 900 recruits. These men were to be citizens between 17 and 29 years of age, and they were to meet the existing standards for enlistment in the Corps. They were to be enlisted in Class III(c), Marine Corps Reserve, and assigned to inactive duty in a General Service Unit of their Reserve District. Both the service record book and the enlistment contract were to be stamped "Colored." Recruiting was to begin on what date.
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21.  Name the first commander of Montford Point Camp
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22.  James E. "Jimmy" Stewart, Sr., my Father of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was responsible for the first Black sworn in the USMC JUNE 1st, 1942. Stewart himself eventually enlisted shortly after. NAME THAT FIRST BLACK MARINE.
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23.  Black combat support units also took part in the assault on Iwo Jima, where, as at Peleliu, their presence confounded the policy of segregation. Because of the random intermingling of white and black units, an African-American Marine, carrying a box of supplies, dived into a shell hole occupied by white Marines, one of whom gave him a cigarette before he scrambled out with his load and ran forward. Here, too, black stewards and members of the depot and ammunition companies came to the aid of the wounded. A white Marine, Robert F. Graf, who lay in a tent awaiting evacuation for further medical treatment, remembered that: "Two black Marines . . . ever so gently . . . placed me on a stretcher and carried me outside to a waiting DUCK ."  WERE THERE BLACK MARINES ON IWO JIMA
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24.  DID YOU KNOW BLACK MARINES WERE FIGHTING ON IWO JIMA.
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25.  What is the new name for Montford Point Camp
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26.  On Saipan, the black Leathernecks demonstrated they had earned the right to fight alongside their white fellow Marines. The accomplishments of the combat service support companies, reported the post newspaper at Camp Lejeune, so impressed the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Lieutenant General Alexander A. Vandegrift — who had replaced Holcomb on 1 January 1944 — that he declared: "The Negro Marines are no longer on trial. They are Marines, period." Time's war correspondent in the Central Pacific, Robert Sherrod, wrote: "The Negro Marines, under fire for the first time, have rated this 4.0 honor." In other words, they had earned the Navy's highest possible rating. What is that number.
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27.  Name the first Black commissioned Reserve Officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, thus becoming the 1st Black to attain this distinction.
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28.  The 51st Defense Battalion's move across a segregated America where one of the trains stopped so the men could have breakfast. Unaware of the layout of the Jim Crow railroad station, the non-commissioned officers moved the black Marines into a waiting room reserved for whites, only to be halted by white military police determined to uphold local law. The African-Americans stood ready to push their way through, but the train commander arrived, conferred with the officer in charge of the MPs, and prevented a tense situation from turning violent. In what city did this happen.
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29.  The present war has called together in our services men of many origins and various races and colors. All are presumed to be imbued with common ideals and standards. All wear the uniform of the United States. All are entitled to the respect to which that common service is entitled. There shall be no discrimination by reason of sectional birth, race, religion, or political beliefs. On the other hand, all individuals are charged with the responsibility of conducting themselves as becomes Americans.  Did Black Marines Fight on Iwo Jima in World War Two.
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