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AP Literature Practice Quiz 1

13 Questions
Literature Quizzes & Trivia
Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Passage from a nineteenth-century essay.
  • 2. 
    Which of the following best describes the rhetorical function of the second sentence in the passage?
    • A. 

      It makes an appeal to authority .

    • B. 

      It restates the thesis of the passage .

    • C. 

      It expresses the causal relationship between morality and writing style .

    • D. 

      It provides a specific example for the preceding generalization

    • E. 

      It presents a misconception that the author will correct .

  • 3. 
    Which of the following phrases does the author use to illustrate  the notion of an unnatural  and pretentious writing style?  
    • A. 

      “unconnected, slipshod allusions’’ (line 4)

    • B. 

      “throw words together’’ (lines 5)

    • C. 

      “gabble on at a venture’’ (line 15)

    • D. 

      “get upon stilts’’ (line 20)

    • E. 

      “pitch upon the very word’’ (line 22)

  • 4. 
    In lines 6–22 of the passage, the author uses an extended analogy between
    • A. 

      Language and morality

    • B. 

      Preaching and acting

    • C. 

      Writing and speaking

    • D. 

      Vulgar English and incorrect pronunciation

    • E. 

      Ordinary life and the theater

  • 5. 
    In line 10, “common speech’’ refers to
    • A. 

      Metaphorical language

    • B. 

      Current slang

    • C. 

      Unaffected expression

    • D. 

      Regional dialect

    • E. 

      Impolite speech

  • 6. 
    Which of the following words is grammatically  and thematically  parallel to “tone’’ (line 21)?
    • A. 

      “solemnity’’ (line 13)

    • B. 

      “pulpit’’ (line 13)

    • C. 

      “stage-declamation’’ (line 13)

    • D. 

      “liberty’’ (line 14)

    • E. 

      “venture’’ (line 15)

  • 7. 
    In context, the expression  “to pitch upon’’ (line 22) is best interpreted as having which of the following meanings?
    • A. 

      To suggest in a casual way

    • B. 

      To set a value on

    • C. 

      To put aside as if by throwing

    • D. 

      To utter glibly and insincerely

    • E. 

      To succeed in finding

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      “theatrical cadence’’ (line 20)

    • B. 

      “foreign circumlocutions’’ (line 29)

    • C. 

      “fine tact’’ (line 32)

    • D. 

      “professional allusions’’ (line 35)

    • E. 

      “universal force’’ (line 36)

  • 9. 
    The author’s obser vation in the sentence beginning “It is clear’’ (lines 31–32) is best described as an example of which of the following?
    • A. 

      Mocking tone

    • B. 

      Linguistic paradox

    • C. 

      Popularity of the familiar style

    • D. 

      The author’s defense of Johnson’s style

    • E. 

      The author’s advice to the reader

  • 10. 
    In line 33, “those’’ refers to which of the following? I .    “words’’ (line 29) II .    “circumlocutions’’ (line 29) III .    “associations’’ (line 29)
    • A. 

      I only

    • B. 

      II only

    • C. 

      I and III only

    • D. 

      II and III only

    • E. 

      I, II, and III

  • 11. 
    The author’s tone in the passage as a whole is best described as
    • A. 

      Harsh and strident

    • B. 

      Informal and analytical

    • C. 

      Contemplative and conciliatory

    • D. 

      Superficial and capricious

    • E. 

      Enthusiastic and optimistic

  • 12. 
    The speaker in the passage can best be described  as a person who
    • A. 

      Is committed to developing his skills as a writer

    • B. 

      Is actually more interested in being a musician than in being a writer

    • C. 

      Is motivated very dif ferently from the jazz musicians that he describes

    • D. 

      Has talent as both a musician and a writer

    • E. 

      Aspires to greatness but knows that he will never achieve it

  • 13. 
    That the speaker “sympathized with’’ the drunk’s  “obsession’’ (lines 16–17) is ironic chiefly  because the drunk
    • A. 

      Agitated the speaker purposely and distracted him from his writing

    • B. 

      Was not “poetic" (line 3) and had no basis for his obsession

    • C. 

      Actually disturbed the speaker less than did the singer

    • D. 

      Had little “sensitivity" (line 5) and was undeserving of sympathy

    • E. 

      Was a major source of the noise from which the speaker wished to escape

  • 14. 
    It can be inferred that the speaker and the drunk were “fellow victims’’ (line 22) in that
    • A. 

      Both had lost control of their passions

    • B. 

      Neither received support from friends or relatives

    • C. 

      Each had in a dif ferent way proven to be a failure

    • D. 

      Neither was any longer able to feel guilt or responsibility

    • E. 

      Both were tormented by distracting disturbances

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