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Hispanic Cultural Figures And Legends

10 Questions
Religion Quizzes & Trivia

100% on this quiz will earn you a participation point for Mr. Lawhead's Spanish class. You may take the quiz as many times as you wish. Submit the certificate with the blue forms every Monday. You may receive credit for this quiz only once.

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    According to legend, this woman drowned her children to be with the man she loved who, in turn, rejected her.  She wanders, looking for her dead children, in the night and you can hear her cries in the wind.
    • A. 

      María Asesina

    • B. 

      La Llorona

    • C. 

      Tula Vieja

    • D. 

      La Madre Terrible

    • E. 

      La Señora de Azul

  • 2. 
    A Clean cowboy.
    • A. 

      El Huaso

    • B. 

      Vaquero

    • C. 

      Charro

    • D. 

      Gaucho

    • E. 

      Becerro

  • 3. 
    This spirit can be recognized by her great age and the fact that she has a crow's foot for a hand.  She is said to eat children.
    • A. 

      Santa Muerte

    • B. 

      Señora de la Huanca

    • C. 

      Loup-Garou

    • D. 

      Tula Vieja

    • E. 

      La Virgen Sangrada

  • 4. 
    The plumed serpent god revered by the Aztecs and the Mayas.  Cortés arrived on the date and time predicting its reappearance thereby throwing Moctezuma into a confusing situation.
    • A. 

      Huitzilopochtli

    • B. 

      Quetzalcoatl/Kukulkan

    • C. 

      Arriverderci

    • D. 

      Popocateptl

    • E. 

      Teotihuacán

  • 5. 
    This figure haunts a tiny country in South America.  She is said to find sleeping victims and bites their big toe to suck out their blood.
    • A. 

      Azeman

    • B. 

      Santa Muerte

    • C. 

      La Gran Dedota

    • D. 

      Tula Vieja

    • E. 

      La Señora de Huanca

  • 6. 
    A skeletal figure, usually with a scyth and globe that is revered by many in México.  The Roman Catholic church outlaws venerance of this "saint" but shrines to it will be found throughout México.
    • A. 

      Tula Vieja

    • B. 

      Huitzilopochtli

    • C. 

      Santa Muerte

    • D. 

      Santa Jesusa de Malverde

    • E. 

      La Catrina

  • 7. 
    The "Narco Santo".  Celebrated as a folk saint but outlawed by the Roman Catholic church.  Sometimes known as the "generous saint" or "angel of the poor".
    • A. 

      San Diego

    • B. 

      San Martín de Dolor

    • C. 

      Jesús Malverde

    • D. 

      Dopominio Droguero

    • E. 

      El Gran Teo

  • 8. 
    An Argentinian cowboy.
    • A. 

      Huaso

    • B. 

      Becerro

    • C. 

      Gancho

    • D. 

      Vaquero

    • E. 

      Gaucho

  • 9. 
    Venerated by a Christian sect/cult in Chile.  A runaway Indian slave, Diego, hid out in a small cave and had a vision of Jesus Christ.  He was asked to be a messenger of "my kindness and mercy" by Jesus.  Diego left a small silver cross in the cave.  When he returned later with villagers and the priest, the silver cross had been painted into the wall of the cave.  An annual pilgrimage is made there by believers.
    • A. 

      Lord of Huanca

    • B. 

      Huitzilopochtli

    • C. 

      Señor de la Cuevas

    • D. 

      Mancu Capac

    • E. 

      Azeman

  • 10. 
    This legend concerns a nun and mystic in Castilla, Spain.  She was said to have visions in which she would travel great distances and minister to savages in an unsettled land.  In the 1700's, a general of Spain serving in Texas heard the story of a beautiful woman who would come down to a local village to teach and minister to them.  Their description was of this woman.  Upon returning to Spain he spoke with her and "verified" that it was her and that she had never left Castilla and the cloistered nunnery.
    • A. 

      Alfonsina y el Mar

    • B. 

      Juana de Ibarbourou

    • C. 

      Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

    • D. 

      Santa Muerte

    • E. 

      The Lady in Blue