Astronomy Test

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Astronomy Quizzes & Trivia

  
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  • 1. 
    The basic unit of length in the metric system is the
    • A. 

      Micron

    • B. 

      Meter

    • C. 

      Mile

    • D. 

      Kilometer


  • 2. 
    Which of the following numbers has the same meaning as 8670  
    • A. 

      8.67 x 10 ^ 3

    • B. 

      8.67 x 10 ^ 2

    • C. 

      8.67 x 10 ^ 1

    • D. 

      0.867 x 10 ^ 3


  • 3. 
    The distance traveled by light or by an object is equal to speed times
    • A. 

      Frequency

    • B. 

      Meters

    • C. 

      Mass

    • D. 

      Time


  • 4. 
    The procedure of writing numbers as a decimal value between 1 and 10 times 10 raised toa n integer power (e.g., 2.4 x 10 ^4) is called
    • A. 

      The scientific method

    • B. 

      Mathematical precision

    • C. 

      Scientific notation

    • D. 

      Astronomical designation


  • 5. 
    A light-year is defined as the
    • A. 

      Speed of light in a vacuum

    • B. 

      Average distance from the Earth to the Sun

    • C. 

      Length of the Solar Year

    • D. 

      Distance light travels in one year


  • 6. 
    Which unit of measure, often used by astronomers, is not a preferred SI unit of combination?
    • A. 

      Meter

    • B. 

      Second

    • C. 

      Kg/m^3

    • D. 

      Km/s

    • E. 

      Angstrom


  • 7. 
    In space light travels about
    • A. 

      3 m/s

    • B. 

      300 m/s

    • C. 

      300 km/s

    • D. 

      300,000 km/s


  • 8. 
    The process of breaking light down into its component colors creates a(n)
    • A. 

      Image

    • B. 

      Hologram

    • C. 

      Spectrum

    • D. 

      Pulse


  • 9. 
    Ancient astronomers divided the sky into regions containing distinct groups of stars called
    • A. 

      Clusters

    • B. 

      Coordinates

    • C. 

      Constellations

    • D. 

      Galaxies

    • E. 

      Nebula


  • 10. 
    Scientific results must be
    • A. 

      Hyptothetical

    • B. 

      Reproducible

    • C. 

      Controversial

    • D. 

      Believed by at least 50% of scientists


  • 11. 
    The Earth's atmosphere shields us from most kinds of electromagnetic radiation. The exceptions are
    • A. 

      Visible light and radio waves.

    • B. 

      X-rays and ultraviolet radiation.

    • C. 

      Only visible light frequencies.

    • D. 

      X-rays and gamma rays

    • E. 

      X-rays and radio waves.


  • 12. 
    Compared with visible-light photons, a photon of radio waves has
    • A. 

      Less energy.

    • B. 

      More energy

    • C. 

      The same energy

    • D. 

      Redder energy

    • E. 

      AM energy.


  • 13. 
    The type of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength just longer than that of red light is
    • A. 

      Radio waves.

    • B. 

      X-rays.

    • C. 

      Infrared radiation.

    • D. 

      Gamma rays.

    • E. 

      Ultraviolet radiation.


  • 14. 
    The rule describing the relationship between the temperature of a material and the wavelength of its peak emittedradiation is
    • A. 

      The blackbody rule.

    • B. 

      The quantum theory.

    • C. 

      Planck's law.

    • D. 

      The Stefan-Boltzmann law.

    • E. 

      Wien's law.


  • 15. 
    The rule describing the relationship between the total radiant energy emitted by a blackbody to its temperature is
    • A. 

      The blackbody rule.

    • B. 

      The quantum theory.

    • C. 

      Planck's law.

    • D. 

      The Stefan-Boltzmann law.

    • E. 

      The Wien displacement law.


  • 16. 
    The atomic model that places electrons in definite orbits around the nucleus but allows only certain orbits to exist isthe
    • A. 

      Bohr model.

    • B. 

      Einstein model.

    • C. 

      Feynman model.

    • D. 

      Rutherford model.

    • E. 

      Thomson model.


  • 17. 
    If electrons are or removed from a neutral atom the atom is said to be
    • A. 

      Nuclear.

    • B. 

      Ionized.

    • C. 

      Doubly neutral.

    • D. 

      Electronic.

    • E. 

      A proto-atom.


  • 18. 
    The lowest possible energy state of an atom is called the
    • A. 

      Excited state.

    • B. 

      Ground state.

    • C. 

      Neutral state.

    • D. 

      Photon level.

    • E. 

      Balmer level.


  • 19. 
    When a gas removes energy at a particular wavelength from radiation passing through it, it creates a(n)
    • A. 

      Continuous spectrum.

    • B. 

      Emission line.

    • C. 

      Stellar spectrum.

    • D. 

      Absorption line.

    • E. 

      Black hole.


  • 20. 
    In a spectrum, bright lines that appear at wavelengths where there is more radiation than at neighboring wavelengthsare called
    • A. 

      Absorption lines.

    • B. 

      Emission lines.

    • C. 

      Fraunhofer lines.

    • D. 

      Continuum lines

    • E. 

      Stellar lines.


  • 21. 
    A curved lens or mirror can form an image by bringing light to a(n)
    • A. 

      Aberration.

    • B. 

      Focus.

    • C. 

      Resolution.

    • D. 

      Divergence.

    • E. 

      Ray.


  • 22. 
    A reflecting telescope that uses a secondary mirror to reflect light to the side of the telescope is called a(n)
    • A. 

      Newtonian.

    • B. 

      Cassegrain.

    • C. 

      Schmidt.

    • D. 

      Gregorian.

    • E. 

      Halleyan.


  • 23. 
    All other things being equal, and ignoring atmospheric effects, a reflecting telescope with a large objective mirror willhave, compared with a telescope with a smaller mirror,
    • A. 

      Better light-gathering power only

    • B. 

      Better resolution only.

    • C. 

      Better light-gathering power and better resolution.

    • D. 

      Better light-gathering power but poorer resolution.

    • E. 

      Better infrared sensitivity.


  • 24. 
    Today, sites for new large ground-based telescopes are selected primarily on the basis of all the following except
    • A. 

      Proximity to universities and research centers

    • B. 

      Elevation above sea level.

    • C. 

      The characteristics of the atmosphere above the proposed site.

    • D. 

      Ability to see the southern sky.

    • E. 

      Dark sky.


  • 25. 
    The Hubble Space Telescope is a(n)
    • A. 

      Ground-based refracting telescope

    • B. 

      Ground-based reflecting telescope.

    • C. 

      Orbiting refracting telescope.

    • D. 

      Orbiting reflecting telescope.

    • E. 

      Orbiting radio telescope.


  • 26. 
    A radio telescope 100 meters across, when used to measure 10-centimeter waves, is
    • A. 

      1,000,000 wavelengths across.

    • B. 

      1000 wavelengths across.

    • C. 

      100 wavelengths across.

    • D. 

      10 wavelengths across.

    • E. 

      1 wavelength across.


  • 27. 
    A method for improving the images produced by ground-based optical telescopes despite blurring by the Earth'satmosphere is called
    • A. 

      Fourier transformation.

    • B. 

      Very long baseline interferometry

    • C. 

      Down-conversion

    • D. 

      Adaptive optics.

    • E. 

      Narrow-band filtering.


  • 28. 
    The ability to distinguish between details or to distinguish two adjacent objects as separate is
    • A. 

      Reflection.

    • B. 

      Refraction

    • C. 

      Aperture.

    • D. 

      Resolution.

    • E. 

      Spectroscopy.


  • 29. 
    NASA's successor to the Hubble Space Telescope is to be the
    • A. 

      Planck Telescope.

    • B. 

      Extremely Large Telescope.

    • C. 

      Neil Armstrong Space Telescope.

    • D. 

      George Washington Telescope.

    • E. 

      James Webb Space Telescope.


  • 30. 
    NASA's set of Great Observatories includes all but
    • A. 

      Hubble Space Telescope

    • B. 

      Spitzer Space Telescope

    • C. 

      Compton Gamma-ray Observatory

    • D. 

      Chandra X-ray Observatory

    • E. 

      Keck Telescope


  • 31. 
    The most obvious difference between the images of planets and stars, as seen from the ground, is that stars
    • A. 

      Twinkle.

    • B. 

      Change color.

    • C. 

      Are very small.

    • D. 

      Move through the sky.

    • E. 

      Change their shape.


  • 32. 
    For any location on the Earth there is a point directly overhead in the sky called the
    • A. 

      Autumnal equinox.

    • B. 

      Vernal equinox.

    • C. 

      Hour circle.

    • D. 

      Meridian.

    • E. 

      Zenith.


  • 33. 
    The calendar containing 365 days with every fourth year a leap year, except century years not divisible by 400, is the
    • A. 

      Babylonian calendar.

    • B. 

      Gregorian calendar.

    • C. 

      Julian calendar

    • D. 

      Roman calendar

    • E. 

      King James calendar.


  • 34. 
    If the Sun is just setting, and the Moon is at its first quarter phase, the Moon will be
    • A. 

      Directly overhead.

    • B. 

      On the meridian.

    • C. 

      On the eastern horizon.

    • D. 

      Below the horizon

    • E. 

      5° below the zenith.


  • 35. 
    The period between new Moons is called a
    • A. 

      Lunar year

    • B. 

      Month.

    • C. 

      Sidereal day

    • D. 

      Fortnight

    • E. 

      Saros.


  • 36. 
    The photosphere of the Sun as seen from Earth, covers an angle of about
    • A. 

      1/2°.

    • B. 

      1°.

    • C. 

      2°.

    • D. 

      5°.

    • E. 

      10°.


  • 37. 
    A star that is 100 times fainter than another star at the same distance will be
    • A. 

      1 magnitude dimmer

    • B. 

      2.5 magnitudes dimmer.

    • C. 

      3 magnitudes dimmer.

    • D. 

      5 magnitudes dimmer.

    • E. 

      10 magnitudes dimmer.


  • 38. 
    The moon looks reddish at a total lunar eclipse because
    • A. 

      The Sun hits it at sunset.

    • B. 

      It is illuminated mainly by the Sun's H-alpha red radiation.

    • C. 

      It is red hot.

    • D. 

      It is Dopper shifted into the red.

    • E. 

      Sunlight is bent through the Earth's atmosphere, with blue scattered out.


  • 39. 
    If the North Star is Polaris, the South Star is
    • A. 

      Betelgeuse

    • B. 

      Orion

    • C. 

      Non-existent.

    • D. 

      Octans.

    • E. 

      Sirius.


  • 40. 
    When the next total solar eclipse occurs in the United States, viewers will have to
    • A. 

      Use solar filters during totality.

    • B. 

      Travel to a path about 200 km wide.

    • C. 

      Use pinhole cameras to see it.

    • D. 

      Pay admission.

    • E. 

      Cover their eyes.


  • 41. 
    Not long after the death of Nicholas Copernicus, a Danish nobleman used giant instruments to makeobservations of the planet's motions with unprecedented accuracy. This astronomer was
    • A. 

      Galileo Galilei

    • B. 

      Johannes Kepler.

    • C. 

      Isaac Newton.

    • D. 

      Tycho Brahe.

    • E. 

      Ole Rømer.


  • 42. 
    Ptolemy's ideas about the Universe and a summary of the ideas of his predecessors were contained in his majorwork,
    • A. 

      The Almagest.

    • B. 

      The Encyclopedia.

    • C. 

      Primum Mobile.

    • D. 

      Revolutionibus.

    • E. 

      Sidereus Nuncius.


  • 43. 
    Which pair of planets was known to the ancient Greeks?
    • A. 

      Venus, Mars

    • B. 

      Earth, Uranus

    • C. 

      Jupiter, Pluto

    • D. 

      Saturn, Neptune

    • E. 

      Pluto, Mars


  • 44. 
    The closer a planet, asteroid, or comet is to the Sun in its orbit, the faster it moves. This is a consequence of
    • A. 

      Kepler's first law.

    • B. 

      The Law of Equal Areas.

    • C. 

      Kepler's third law.

    • D. 

      The speed of light.

    • E. 

      Newton's second law.


  • 45. 
    Galileo's telescopic observations of Venus proved conclusively that
    • A. 

      Venus does not travel on a deferent centered on the Earth.

    • B. 

      The Earth orbits the Sun.

    • C. 

      The orbit of Venus is elliptical.

    • D. 

      The orbit of the Earth is elliptical.

    • E. 

      The axis of the Earth is inclined.


  • 46. 
    If a satellite orbiting just above the surface of the Earth orbits in about 1.5 hours, then at about how many Earthradii from the Earth's center must a satellite orbit to have a period of 24 hours?
    • A. 

      2.1

    • B. 

      6.4

    • C. 

      8

    • D. 

      11.3

    • E. 

      24


  • 47. 
    The line that extends from one edge of an ellipse to the other, passing through both foci of the ellipse is calledthe
    • A. 

      Eccentric.

    • B. 

      Major axis.

    • C. 

      Semimajor axis.

    • D. 

      Minor axis.

    • E. 

      Semiminor axis.


  • 48. 
    An object is moving through space. If all forces are removed from the object, then it will
    • A. 

      Continue in a straight line but slow down and stop

    • B. 

      Move in random directions.

    • C. 

      Continue in a straight line at constant speed.

    • D. 

      Enter a circular orbit.


  • 49. 
    Two remarkable aspects of our solar system that must be accounted for in any theory of cosmogony are that
    • A. 

      The planets all have the same density and composition

    • B. 

      All of the planets revolve around the Sun in the same sense as the Sun rotates, and the orbits of all of the planets lie in nearly the same plane.

    • C. 

      All of the planets rotate in the same sense as the Sun, and all have a density similar to that of water

    • D. 

      The orbits of all of the planets lie in nearly the same plane, and all have the same composition


  • 50. 
    Which is the only planet (of the 9-planet system) whose orbit is significantly tilted with respect to the ecliptic?
    • A. 

      Mercury

    • B. 

      Earth

    • C. 

      Jupiter

    • D. 

      Saturn

    • E. 

      Pluto


  • 51. 
    Much of our knowledge of the interior of the Earth comes from the study of planetary vibrations, which is thescience of
    • A. 

      Geography.

    • B. 

      Geology.

    • C. 

      Meteorology.

    • D. 

      Planetology.

    • E. 

      Seismology.


  • 52. 
    The process of forming layers within a body because of differences in thermal characteristics and densitybetween materials is called
    • A. 

      Differentiation.

    • B. 

      Geothermal energy

    • C. 

      Internal heat.

    • D. 

      Isotopes.

    • E. 

      Plate tectonics


  • 53. 
    The highest and lowest tides occur
    • A. 

      In spring

    • B. 

      When the Moon is at first or last quarter

    • C. 

      When the Moon is new or full.

    • D. 

      When the Sun's gravitational pull is the greatest

    • E. 

      When the spring tide is neap


  • 54. 
    Charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field may collide with molecules in the upper atmosphere andproduce the glowing lights called
    • A. 

      Aurorae.

    • B. 

      Ionosphere.

    • C. 

      Ozone layer.

    • D. 

      Magnetic field.

    • E. 

      Van Allen belts.


  • 55. 
    Of the inner planets, which has the strongest magnetic field?
    • A. 

      Mercury

    • B. 

      Venus

    • C. 

      Earth

    • D. 

      Mars

    • E. 

      None of the above


  • 56. 
    Most of the rocks found on the Moon are
    • A. 

      Metamorphic.

    • B. 

      Limestone.

    • C. 

      Shales.

    • D. 

      Igneous.

    • E. 

      Sedimentary.


  • 57. 
    Of all Moon rocks sampled, rocks taken from the lunar maria tend to be the
    • A. 

      Heaviest.

    • B. 

      Lightest.

    • C. 

      Oldest.

    • D. 

      Youngest.

    • E. 

      Hollowest.


  • 58. 
    The theory that the Moon formed from a ring of material ejected from the Earth by a collision is the
    • A. 

      Condensation theory

    • B. 

      Capture theory.

    • C. 

      Fission theory.

    • D. 

      Co-accretion theory.

    • E. 

      Collision theory.


  • 59. 
    The fraction of the light falling on a body that is reflected is the body's
    • A. 

      Albedo.

    • B. 

      Density.

    • C. 

      Phase.

    • D. 

      Color index

    • E. 

      Refraction.


  • 60. 
    Which is heavier, a ton of feathers or a ton of lead?
    • A. 

      Feathers by a little

    • B. 

      Lead

    • C. 

      Neither (you still need to know why!)

    • D. 

      Feathers by a lot

    • E. 

      Half the feathers plus half the lead


  • 61. 
    The largest planetary satellite in the solar system is
    • A. 

      Charon

    • B. 

      Ganymede

    • C. 

      The Moon

    • D. 

      Titan

    • E. 

      Triton


  • 62. 
    Violently volcanic, with many simultaneous eruptions now going on, is Jupiter’s satellite
    • A. 

      Io

    • B. 

      Europa

    • C. 

      Ganymede

    • D. 

      Callisto

    • E. 

      Amalthea


  • 63. 
    The closest views of Jupiter's moons have come from which spacecraft?
    • A. 

      Pioneer 10

    • B. 

      Voyager 1

    • C. 

      Cassini

    • D. 

      Mariner 10

    • E. 

      Galileo


  • 64. 
    The Galileo atmospheric probe found that the amount of water vapor in Jupiter's atmosphere, at least where itentered, is
    • A. 

      Zero.

    • B. 

      About as expected

    • C. 

      Less than expected.

    • D. 

      More than expected.

    • E. 

      Enough for it to rain every day.


  • 65. 
    The largest satellite of Saturn is
    • A. 

      Ganymede.

    • B. 

      Hyperion.

    • C. 

      Tethys.

    • D. 

      Titan.

    • E. 

      Triton.


  • 66. 
    Saturn’s satellite with water geysers, discovered from the Cassini mission, is
    • A. 

      Mimas

    • B. 

      Enceladus

    • C. 

      Rhea

    • D. 

      Iapetus

    • E. 

      Titan


  • 67. 
    Compared with the Earth's orbit around the Sun, Uranus's orbit is
    • A. 

      2 times larger.

    • B. 

      12 times larger.

    • C. 

      19 times larger.

    • D. 

      84 times larger.

    • E. 

      1,000 times larger.


  • 68. 
    The initial discovery of the rings of Uranus came accidentally during observations of its
    • A. 

      Phases.

    • B. 

      Occultation of a star.

    • C. 

      Rotation period

    • D. 

      Revolution period.

    • E. 

      Transit of the Sun.


  • 69. 
    It is possible to explain the peculiar orientation of Uranus's magnetic field if the field is generated
    • A. 

      Deep in its core.

    • B. 

      In the crust.

    • C. 

      In a thin shell outside the core.

    • D. 

      By the radiation belts.

    • E. 

      In the atmosphere.


  • 70. 
    The period of Neptune's solar orbit is about
    • A. 

      30 Earth years.

    • B. 

      100 Earth years.

    • C. 

      165 Earth years.

    • D. 

      195 Earth years.


  • 71. 
    The period of the orbit of Pluto around the Sun is
    • A. 

      2 Earth years

    • B. 

      12 Earth years.

    • C. 

      30 Earth years.

    • D. 

      248 Earth years.

    • E. 

      1000 Earth years.


  • 72. 
    The first satellite of the planet Pluto that was discovered is named
    • A. 

      Chiron.

    • B. 

      Charon.

    • C. 

      Puck.

    • D. 

      Oberon.

    • E. 

      Hamlet


  • 73. 
    The known Kuiper belt objects have orbital semimajor axes in the approximate range
    • A. 

      5 to 10 A.U.

    • B. 

      10 to 20 A.U.

    • C. 

      20 to 30 A.U.

    • D. 

      30 to 80 A.U.

    • E. 

      1 to 2 light years


  • 74. 
    The density of Pluto is about
    • A. 

      1 g/cm3.

    • B. 

      2 g/cm3.

    • C. 

      5.5 g/cm3.

    • D. 

      10 g/cm3.

    • E. 

      30 g/cm3.


  • 75. 
    The matter at the center of the head of a comet is the
    • A. 

      Coma.

    • B. 

      Dust tail

    • C. 

      Gas tail

    • D. 

      Hydrogen cloud.

    • E. 

      Nucleus.


  • 76. 
    The gas tail of a comet is created by the effects of the
    • A. 

      Nucleus.

    • B. 

      Coma.

    • C. 

      Reaction force

    • D. 

      Solar wind.

    • E. 

      Gas jets.


  • 77. 
    The composition of the dust in Comet Halley, as measured by the Giotto spacecraft in 1986, is most like that of
    • A. 

      Venus.

    • B. 

      A giant planet moon.

    • C. 

      The early Solar System.

    • D. 

      Planetary material ejected by meteorite impacts.

    • E. 

      Saturn's moon Titan.


  • 78. 
    When a fragment of interplanetary matter survives its trip through an atmosphere to reach the surface of anastronomical body it is called a
    • A. 

      Bolide.

    • B. 

      Fireball.

    • C. 

      Meteor.

    • D. 

      Meteoroid.

    • E. 

      Meteorite.


  • 79. 
    A few meteorites contain
    • A. 

      Iron.

    • B. 

      Stone.

    • C. 

      Liquid water

    • D. 

      Organic compounds

    • E. 

      Methane.


  • 80. 
    Among the many bodies that resulted from the aggregation of planetesimals when the solar system was formedwere minor planets, less than 1000 km across, called
    • A. 

      Asteroids.

    • B. 

      Meteoroids.

    • C. 

      Meteorites.

    • D. 

      Planetoids.

    • E. 

      Plutoids.


  • 81. 
    Modern theories of solar system formation posit that planets formed through aggregation of many smaller bodies, each perhaps only hundreds of kilometers in size, called
    • A. 

      Planetoids.

    • B. 

      Planetesimals.

    • C. 

      Protoplanets.

    • D. 

      Nebulae.

    • E. 

      Venusians.


  • 82. 
    The first extra-solar planets detected are not likely candidates for life because
    • A. 

      The planets are too small

    • B. 

      Their surface temperatures are probably too low for liquid water

    • C. 

      They orbit pulsars, which emit too much powerful radiation

    • D. 

      They are too distant from the star they orbit.

    • E. 

      They are invisible.


  • 83. 
    So far, it appears that one way extra-solar planetary systems differ from our solar systems in that
    • A. 

      Stars in the centers of these systems are all much more massive than the Sun

    • B. 

      The planetary systems are typically larger than our solar system.

    • C. 

      These planetary systems never have more than one planet.

    • D. 

      Many have giant planets are located closer to the central star than Jupiter in our system.

    • E. 

      They are found around B stars


  • 84. 
    Several early reports of the detection of extrasolar planets later proved to be incorrect. This illustrates that
    • A. 

      Most astronomers are careless.

    • B. 

      Detecting such objects is very difficult.

    • C. 

      Extrasolar planets do not exist

    • D. 

      All such objects are smaller than Jupiter.

    • E. 

      The planets were there but they evaporated


  • 85. 
    As of this writing, how many of the newly-discovered extrasolar planets have been imaged directly?
    • A. 

      None

    • B. 

      At least one

    • C. 

      5

    • D. 

      All of them

    • E. 

      About half


  • 86. 
    Doppler methods are biased toward finding planets
    • A. 

      Smaller than Earth

    • B. 

      Composed of ices.

    • C. 

      With orbital periods greater than 20 years

    • D. 

      With orbital planes along the line of sight.

    • E. 

      With large moons


  • 87. 
    Which spacecraft mission is not intended to search for extrasolar planets?
    • A. 

      Eddington

    • B. 

      Space Interferometry Mission (SIM)

    • C. 

      Cassini

    • D. 

      Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF)

    • E. 

      Kepler


  • 88. 
    Most of the extrasolar planets detected since 1995 are unlikely to harbor life as we know it because
    • A. 

      UFO's patrol space to wipe out incipient life in new places

    • B. 

      They are too far from their stars

    • C. 

      Their orbits are too inclined relative to the equators of their stars.

    • D. 

      They are too small

    • E. 

      They are gas giants, without solid surfaces


  • 89. 
    ________________ are objects more massive than Jupiter but not massive enough to start fusing hydrogen intheir cores
    • A. 

      White dwarfs

    • B. 

      Black holes

    • C. 

      Red dwarfs

    • D. 

      Yellow Dwarfs

    • E. 

      Brown dwarfs


  • 90. 
    As of this writing, the most massive extrasolar planets detected are about ________________ times the mass ofJupiter
    • A. 

      Two

    • B. 

      Three

    • C. 

      Five

    • D. 

      Ten

    • E. 

      Fifteenths


  • 91. 
    The outermost level of the Sun is the
    • A. 

      Photosphere.

    • B. 

      Solar corona.

    • C. 

      Solar wind.

    • D. 

      Scattering of sunlight.

    • E. 

      Sunspots.


  • 92. 
    All of the energy of the Sun is generated in the
    • A. 

      Chromosphere.

    • B. 

      Core.

    • C. 

      Corona.

    • D. 

      Photosphere.

    • E. 

      Solar wind.


  • 93. 
    About 94 percent of the nuclei in the outer parts of the Sun are
    • A. 

      Helium.

    • B. 

      Hydrogen.

    • C. 

      Heavy elements.

    • D. 

      Gas.

    • E. 

      Iron.


  • 94. 
    The light we receive from the Sun comes from the layer of the Sun's atmosphere called the
    • A. 

      Photosphere.

    • B. 

      Solar corona

    • C. 

      Solar wind.

    • D. 

      Scattering of sunlight

    • E. 

      Sunspots.


  • 95. 
    The wavelength peak of the Sun's radiation is in the middle of the
    • A. 

      Infrared region.

    • B. 

      Radio spectrum

    • C. 

      Ultraviolet region

    • D. 

      Visible spectrum

    • E. 

      X-ray region


  • 96. 
    The solar corona is so hot it emits mainly
    • A. 

      Infrared radiation

    • B. 

      Radio waves

    • C. 

      Ultraviolet radiation

    • D. 

      Visible light.

    • E. 

      X-rays


  • 97. 
    The dark region of a sunspot is often surrounded by a less dark region called the
    • A. 

      Granule.

    • B. 

      Hole.

    • C. 

      Penumbra.

    • D. 

      Spicule.

    • E. 

      Umbra.


  • 98. 
    Dark lines threading their way across the Sun, visible in H light near sunspots are
    • A. 

      Coronal holes.

    • B. 

      Filaments.

    • C. 

      Solar flares

    • D. 

      Plages.

    • E. 

      Prominences.


  • 99. 
    The Maunder minimum was a period beginning in the late 17th century when there were apparently no
    • A. 

      Coronal holes

    • B. 

      Eclipses.

    • C. 

      Solar flares

    • D. 

      Solar magnetic reversals.

    • E. 

      Sunspots.


  • 100. 
    Compared to surrounding regions on the photosphere, sunspots are
    • A. 

      Hotter.

    • B. 

      Cooler.

    • C. 

      Much less dense

    • D. 

      Deficient in helium

    • E. 

      Bluer.


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