Types Of Phrases Trivia: Questions And Answers

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Betsy Jarvis
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Quizzes Created: 1 | Total Attempts: 71,772
Questions: 20 | Viewed: 71,777

1.

The three of us divided up the remaining containers of chocolate pudding. 

Answer: Preposition
Explanation:
In this sentence, "of" is used to show the relationship between the containers and the chocolate pudding. It indicates that the containers belong to or are associated with the chocolate pudding. Therefore, "preposition" is the correct answer.
2.

My brother, a clown by profession, works all weekend at parties and gatherings.

Answer: Appositive
Explanation:
The given sentence contains an appositive, which is a noun or noun phrase that renames or identifies another noun in the sentence. In this case, the appositive "a clown by profession" renames "my brother." It provides additional information about his occupation and helps to clarify his role as a clown.
3.

To conclude tonight's program, our chief of staff would like to say a few words.

Answer: Infinitive
Explanation:
The correct answer is "Infinitive" because the phrase "to say a few words" functions as an infinitive phrase, which is a verb form that is used as a noun, adjective, or adverb. In this case, it is used as a noun to show the purpose or intention of the chief of staff.
4.

Wanting to save money, Lysbeth spent the morning clipping and filing coupons.

Answer: Participle
Explanation:
In the sentence “Wanting to save money, Lysbeth spent the morning clipping and filing coupons”, the word “Wanting” is a participle. It is derived from the verb “want” and is used here as an adjective to modify the noun “Lysbeth”. The phrase “Wanting to save money” is a participle phrase that describes the reason why Lysbeth spent the morning clipping and filing coupons.
5.

Marybeth dreams about becoming a NASA astronaut.

Answer: Gerund
Explanation:
The word "dreams" in the sentence is a verb that functions as a noun, indicating an action or activity. In this case, "dreams" is used to describe what Marybeth desires or aspires to do, making it a gerund. A gerund is a verb form that ends in -ing and functions as a noun in a sentence. In this context, "dreams" functions as the subject of the sentence, indicating Marybeth's goal or ambition.
6.

The plumber was unable to finish the difficult job in one day.

Answer: Infinitive
Explanation:
The correct answer is "Infinitive" because the sentence indicates that the plumber was unable to finish the job in one day. The word "to finish" is an infinitive verb form, which is used to express the idea of completing an action. In this case, the infinitive form shows that the plumber was not able to complete the difficult job within the timeframe of one day.
7.

Excusing the boys for their rude and reckless behavior was not an option.

Answer: Gerund
Explanation:
The correct answer is "Gerund" because "excusing" is a verb form that functions as a noun in the sentence. It is derived from the verb "excuse" and ends in -ing, which is a common characteristic of gerunds. In this sentence, "excusing" is used as the subject of the sentence and represents an action or activity.
8.

Pygmalion is by George Shaw, one of my favorite playwrights.

Answer: Appositive
Explanation:
The given sentence "Pygmalion is by George Shaw, one of my favorite playwrights" contains an appositive. An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames or identifies another noun or pronoun in the sentence. In this case, "one of my favorite playwrights" renames and identifies "George Shaw." Therefore, the correct answer is appositive.
9.

My dog is so scared of storms that she runs and hides under the sofa or behind my desk whenever it rains.

Answer: Preposition
Explanation:
The correct answer is "Preposition" because the word "of" in the sentence is functioning as a preposition. Prepositions are words that show a relationship between a noun or pronoun and another word in the sentence. In this case, "of" shows the relationship between "scared" and "storms".
10.

Exercising is a good stress reliever.

Answer: Gerund
Explanation:
The correct answer is "Gerund" because "exercising" is functioning as a noun in the sentence. It is used to talk about the action of exercising as a general concept, rather than a specific instance of exercise. Gerunds are formed by adding -ing to a verb and can act as subjects, objects, or complements in a sentence. In this case, "exercising" is the subject of the sentence and is being described as a good reliever.
11.

San Francisco is a bustling city in California. 

Answer: Participle
Explanation:
Participle is a word that is formed from a verb and is used as an adjective. In the sentence, "San Francisco is a bustling city in California," "bustling" functions as a participle, derived from the verb "bustle." It describes the city's lively and energetic nature, acting as an adjective to convey its vibrant and dynamic atmosphere.
12.

Which of the following is an example of an adverbial phrase?

Answer: "With a smile on her face"
Explanation:
"With a smile on her face" is an adverbial phrase because it provides additional information about how an action is performed. In this case, it tells us how someone is smiling, indicating the manner of the action.
13.

John went to college with the dream to study engineering. 

Answer: Infinitive
Explanation:
The correct answer is "Infinitive" because the phrase "to study engineering" functions as an infinitive, which is a verb form that is typically preceded by the word "to" and is used as a noun, adjective, or adverb. In this sentence, "to study engineering" functions as the purpose or goal of John going to college.
14.

Bowser, the dog with sharp teeth, is coming around the corner.

Answer: Appositive
Explanation:
The given sentence "Bowser, the dog with sharp teeth, is coming around the corner" contains an appositive. An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames or identifies another noun or pronoun in the sentence. In this case, "the dog with sharp teeth" is the appositive, providing additional information about Bowser. It helps to clarify and describe Bowser further.
15.

Francis found her lost sneakers behind the sofa in the living room.

Answer: Preposition
Explanation:
The word "behind" in the sentence is functioning as a preposition. It shows the relationship between the noun "sofa" and the noun phrase "the living room." Prepositions are used to indicate location, direction, time, and other relationships between words in a sentence. In this case, "behind" is indicating the location of where Francis found her lost sneakers.
16.

The store around the corner is painting its interior.

Answer: Preposition
Explanation:
The word "around" in the sentence indicates that the store is located in close proximity to the corner. In this context, "around" is functioning as a preposition, showing the relationship between the store and the corner. The preposition "around" is used to indicate movement or location in the vicinity of something, which fits the meaning of the sentence.
17.

"Blinded by the light, revved up like a deuce, another runner in the night"- Blinded by the Light by Manfred Mann. 

Answer: Participle
Explanation:
The phrase "Blinded by the light" is an example of a participle. A participle is a verb form that functions as an adjective, describing or modifying a noun or pronoun. In this case, "blinded" is the past participle of the verb "blind" and it describes the noun "light". It suggests that the light is so intense that it causes someone to be unable to see clearly.
18.

Walking the dog is not my favorite task.

Answer: Gerund
Explanation:
The given sentence "Walking the dog is not my favorite task" contains the word "walking" which functions as a noun. It is derived from the verb "walk" by adding the suffix "-ing" and is used to refer to the action of walking. In this sentence, "walking" acts as the subject of the sentence and is preceded by the article "the". Therefore, the correct answer is "Gerund", which is a verb form that functions as a noun.
19.

Men often say on their dating profiles that they like to go walking in the sand on a beach; beware, for this is only so that men can get the ladies. 

Answer: Preposition/gerund
Explanation:
The given sentence structure "walking in the sand on a beach" indicates that "walking" is functioning as a gerund, which is a verb form that acts as a noun. In this case, it represents the activity or action of walking. The preposition "in" shows the location or place where the walking is happening, which is "the sand." Therefore, the correct answer is "Preposition/gerund." This structure suggests that men mention their interest in walking on the beach to attract women.
20.

To get to our house, drive south on Main Street, turn right onto Webster Drive, and park two houses from the corner.

Answer: Infinitive/preposition/preposition
Explanation:
The given sentence "To get to our house, drive south on Main Street, turn right onto Webster Drive, and park two houses from the corner" follows the structure of an infinitive/preposition/preposition. "To get" is an infinitive because it is the base form of the verb "get." The second preposition "from" indicates the starting point or direction ("from the corner"). The third preposition "onto" shows the movement or action of turning onto Webster Drive. 
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